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Vitamin D lower in NFL football players who suffered muscled injuries, study reports
American Orthopaedic Society for Sports Medicine ^ | July 10, 2011 | Unknown

Posted on 07/10/2011 11:27:47 AM PDT by decimon

SAN DIEGO, CA – Vitamin D deficiency has been known to cause an assortment of health problems, a recent study being presented at the American Orthopaedic Society for Sports Medicine's (AOSSM) Annual Meeting in San Diego today, suggests that lack of the vitamin might also increase the chance of muscle injuries in athletes, specifically NFL football players.

"Eighty percent of the football team we studied had vitamin D insufficiency. African American players and players who suffered muscle injuries had significantly lower levels," said Michael Shindle, MD, lead researcher and member of Summit Medical Group.

Researchers identified 89 football players from a single NFL team and provided laboratory testing of vitamin D levels in the spring 2010 as part of routine pre-season evaluations. The mean age of the players was 25. The team provided data to determine the number of players who had lost time due to muscle injuries. Vitamin D levels were then classified based on player race and time lost due to muscle injury.

Twenty-seven players had deficient levels (< 20 ng/ML) and an additional 45 had levels consistent with insufficiency (20-31.9 ng/mL). Seventeen players had values within normal limits (>32 ng/mL). The mean vitamin D level in white players was 30.3 ng/mL while the mean level for black players was 20.4 ng/mL. Sixteen players suffered a muscle injury with a mean vitamin D level of 19.9.

"Screening and treatment of vitamin D insufficiency in professional athletes may be a simple way to help prevent injuries," said Dr. Scott Rodeo, MD, Co-Chief of the Sports Medicine and Shoulder Service at the Hospital for Special Surgery. "Further research also needs to be conducted in order to determine if increasing vitamin D leads to improved maximum muscle function," said Dr. Joseph Lane, MD, Director of the Metabolic Bone Disease Service at the Hospital for Special Surgery."

###

The American Orthopaedic Society for Sports Medicine (AOSSM) is a world leader in sports medicine education, research, communication and fellowship, and includes national and international orthopaedic sports medicine leaders. The Society works closely with many other sports medicine specialists, including athletic trainers, physical therapists, family physicians, and others to improve the identification, prevention, treatment, and rehabilitation of sports injuries. AOSSM is also a founding partner of the STOP Sports Injuries campaign to prevent overuse and traumatic injuries in kids. For more information on AOSSM or the STOP Sports Injuries campaign, visit www.sportsmed.org or www.stopsportsinjuries.org


TOPICS: Health/Medicine; Sports
KEYWORDS: vitamind
The info in this release is incomplete but it gives the general idea.
1 posted on 07/10/2011 11:27:50 AM PDT by decimon
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To: neverdem; DvdMom; grey_whiskers; Ladysmith; Roos_Girl; Silentgypsy; conservative cat; ...

Ping


2 posted on 07/10/2011 11:28:38 AM PDT by decimon
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To: decimon

did playing in a dome stadium have anything to do with individual players’ levels?


3 posted on 07/10/2011 11:29:08 AM PDT by stefanbatory (Insert witty tagline here)
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To: stefanbatory

all from same team...maybe I should read before posting...


4 posted on 07/10/2011 11:30:28 AM PDT by stefanbatory (Insert witty tagline here)
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To: All

Sounds like they need to get a tan.


5 posted on 07/10/2011 11:53:38 AM PDT by troy McClure
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To: decimon

One reason might be, if they are injured they aren’t spending so much time outside in the sun. Also my doc told me if you have any kind of autoimmune diseases(inflammation too maybe?) your body will soak up vitamin D, you end up needing more. The darker your skin is, either from genetics of tanning/burning, or if you are over weight it takes longer for your body to make D from the sun.


6 posted on 07/10/2011 11:56:33 AM PDT by MsLady (Be the kind of woman that when you get up in the morning, the devil says, "Oh crap, she's UP !!")
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To: decimon
I was having a discussion with a high school buddy of mine who lives in MN (while I was visiting) and has cancer. During our discussion, I said, "Why do you think sooo many people have cancer nowadays...I'm always hearing about someone?" He said that his doctor believes (personally) that because of the long winters in MN--with so many staying inside for so long, may have something to do with it.

Also while there on my vacation, I shared that story with another friend of mine in MN and she happened to be due for a yearly physical. She specifically asked her doctor to test her Vitamin D level. He did. She was soooo low! He gave her high dosage Vitamin D pills and she said, "I felt better and I SLEPT LIKE A BABY!!!" She was sold!

I don't know...just sayin...

7 posted on 07/10/2011 12:03:56 PM PDT by NordP (Common Sense ConservaTEAves - Love of Country, Less Govt, Stop Spending, No Govt Run Health Care!!!)
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To: decimon

That when watching football games, most players suffering leg cramps seem to be blacks points to slight physiological differences.


8 posted on 07/10/2011 12:08:07 PM PDT by fso301
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To: MsLady
Vitamin D deficiency has been known to cause an assortment of health problems,

This is rhetorical overkill. There's a know correlation, but nobody has shown causation, or even suggested a mechanism for low Vitamin D to cause trouble. On the other hand, there are peer-reviewed papers on low Vitamin D being caused by the disease process, and a discussion of the mechanism.

Low Levels Of Vitamin D In Patients With Autoimmune Disease May Be Result, Not Cause, Of The Disease

"Deficiency in vitamin D has been widely regarded as contributing to autoimmune disease, but a review appearing in Autoimmunity Reviews explains that low levels of vitamin D in patients with autoimmune disease may be a result rather than a cause of disease and that supplementing with vitamin D may actually exacerbate autoimmune disease."

9 posted on 07/10/2011 12:14:43 PM PDT by slowhandluke (It's hard to be cynical enough in this age.)
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To: stefanbatory

You’re probably thinking about the old Astroturf—it was hard on knees IIRC.


10 posted on 07/10/2011 12:23:18 PM PDT by lonestar (It takes a village of idiots to elect a village idiot.)
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Click the Chick

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11 posted on 07/10/2011 12:24:10 PM PDT by TheOldLady (FReepmail me to get ON or OFF the ZOT LIGHTNING ping list.)
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To: decimon
I've been trying to keep track of the newer ways that pro athletes take care of themselves using alternative medicine, supplements, and therapies. It is interesting that they have millions of dollars to spend on the most advanced treatments, yet they are now gravitating toward alternative treatments that tend to cost less than modern medicine and modern therapies. I have to conclude that it is because many of the alternative options work better. Some of our high school football players had the chance to hang out with some of the Pittsburgh Steelers. The boys said that the players were popping pills constantly: fish oil, D3, glucosamine/condroiton, C, and hyaluronic acid. They also had standing appointments for chiropractic adjustments.
12 posted on 07/10/2011 12:36:18 PM PDT by goodwithagun (My gun has killed fewer people than Ted Kennedy's car.)
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To: slowhandluke

You need to refrain from posting so enthusiastically when you really don’t have a clue.

In a mouse model of multiple sclerosis, vitamin D was found to reverse experimental autoimmune encephalitis by inhibiting the synthesis of chemokines (22). Similar effects were found by two different groups using a mouse model for diabetes. Nonobese diabetic mice treated with vitamin D were found to have a decrease in pancreatic islet chemokine expression, which was accompanied by less insulitis and inhibition of type 1 diabetes development (23, 24)

http://www.jimmunol.org/content/184/2/965.full


13 posted on 07/10/2011 12:53:53 PM PDT by kruss3 (Kruss3@gmail.com)
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To: slowhandluke
There is a big difference in Vitamin D and Vitamin D3. I take 5000 IU D3 dailey.

On May 6, enroute to the Bahamas I slipped at the airport, hurt my arm and bloodied my upper lip. Assured by EMS I had nothing broken, I hopped on the plane and went.

On May 9, somehow I got into a wetsuit and swam with dolphins.

May 12, back home went to dr. who confirmed I had fractured my shoulder..and messed up my rotator cuff.

I am doing PT now to improve range of motion but I haven's had any real pain or problems. Never lost sleep. Took 2 Aleve or Advil 3X dailey for pain first 2 weeks.

I have given credit to the Vit D3 for how well I've done.

I am female, 72 years old!...and never played in the NFL. LOL!

One of the first studies was in a hospital for the criminally insane. I wasn't there either!

I am a firm believer in Vit D3.

14 posted on 07/10/2011 12:57:26 PM PDT by lonestar (It takes a village of idiots to elect a village idiot.)
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To: pitbully

ping


15 posted on 07/10/2011 1:02:25 PM PDT by granite (“The heart of the wise inclines to the right, but the heart of the fool to the left .”Ecclest 10:2)
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To: lonestar

What is the difference between D and D3?


16 posted on 07/10/2011 1:28:17 PM PDT by fini
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To: fini
I;m not an authority

http://www.differencebetween.net/science/difference-between-vitamin-d-and-vitamin-d3/

17 posted on 07/10/2011 1:38:16 PM PDT by lonestar (It takes a village of idiots to elect a village idiot.)
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To: lonestar
I am a firm believer in Vit D3.

Thanks to FR I started reading about vitamin D3

I am also a firm believer, since started taking 5000 mg of D3 daily I have not been sick once in over 18 months. Not even a sniffle.

18 posted on 07/10/2011 1:54:59 PM PDT by Popman (Obama. First Marxist to turn a five year Marxist plan into a 4 year administration.)
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To: Popman

I don’t like to take medicine. It seems people have more problems with their meds than before they started taking them!


19 posted on 07/10/2011 2:01:55 PM PDT by lonestar (It takes a village of idiots to elect a village idiot.)
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To: decimon

Thanks decimon


20 posted on 07/10/2011 2:05:25 PM PDT by neverdem (Xin loi minh oi)
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To: NordP

Sorry about your friend and her struggles with cancer. Thank you for posting this because it makes a lot of sense.


21 posted on 07/10/2011 2:26:09 PM PDT by momtothree (c)
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To: fso301
I have read that blacks have a bigger problem with the USE of D3 by their skin.....so they likely have lower levels...and yes...EVERYONE....REMEMBER....Vitamin D3...NOT plain Vit D
22 posted on 07/10/2011 3:12:19 PM PDT by goodnesswins
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To: decimon

32 is still pretty deficient. Football is a rough sport. I’d want to see my team be over 50 at least.

I always wonder why orthopedists don’t push their patients to be tested and supplement enough.


23 posted on 07/10/2011 3:54:33 PM PDT by Yaelle
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To: decimon

32 is still pretty deficient. Football is a rough sport. I’d want to see my team be over 50 at least.

I always wonder why orthopedists don’t push their patients to be tested and supplement enough.


24 posted on 07/10/2011 3:54:46 PM PDT by Yaelle
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To: lonestar

Woo hoo, LoneStar! Awesome story! Though I bet that shoulder hurt.

I believe in supplementing to about 60.


25 posted on 07/10/2011 3:57:45 PM PDT by Yaelle
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To: momtothree
Thank you. It's a he and he has esophageal cancer, and went through hell and back, but he's doing really really well, now. It's a slow process and I'm prayin' nightly. It seems to be working! ;-)

I do hope this helps people to at least THINK about the possibilities. I've always thought sunshine was a good more than bad thing. (Just like dessert...better in moderation, but have it once in a while, just don't eat the whole pie ;-) ---but then again, I'm from MN too...and when I was growing up, we didn't see much sun until July and August and then...watch out--lot's of lobster red Scandinavians!!!

26 posted on 07/10/2011 3:58:49 PM PDT by NordP (Common Sense ConservaTEAves - Love of Country, Less Govt, Stop Spending, No Govt Run Health Care!!!)
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To: decimon

My doctor’s conclusion after latest blood work was that I have a Vitamin D deficiency. Just began taking 50,000 MU 3 times a week, and 2,000 mu D3 per day. Was surprised at the recommendation, but am predominantly a northern, indoor person. If anything, I need more exercise. Does anyone make an excercise bike that produces beer?


27 posted on 07/10/2011 4:38:18 PM PDT by Fester Chugabrew (minds change)
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To: Fester Chugabrew
My doctor’s conclusion after latest blood work was that I have a Vitamin D deficiency. Just began taking 50,000 MU 3 times a week, and 2,000 mu D3 per day. Was surprised at the recommendation...

That's in line with what I've seen in some other threads. I guess they jump start start you before bringing you to a maintenance dose.

28 posted on 07/10/2011 5:01:30 PM PDT by decimon
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To: slowhandluke

Interesting!


29 posted on 07/10/2011 5:21:17 PM PDT by fortheDeclaration (When the wicked beareth rule, the people mourn (Pr.29:2))
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To: kruss3
I thought my post was direct to the science, and not enthusiastic at all.

After 7 years of using the MP, my diabetes is gone, the osteoporisis is almost gone, as are the rest of my troubles with a long term case of sarcoidosis. I can wax quite enthusiastic about this, but did not in the previous post.

You'd likely get the same results had you treated those mice with prednisone. Neither prednisone nor Vitamin D is a cure, but both can make you feel pretty good.

30 posted on 07/10/2011 6:25:39 PM PDT by slowhandluke (It's hard to be cynical enough in this age.)
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To: lonestar
And I give credit to avoiding vitamin D as part of the cure for my diabetes, osteoporosis and sarcoid.

If you are healthy, extra vitamin D just acts like a low dose of prednisone. It's a potent anti-inflammatory.

You are 72 and healthy. I've been in and out of the hospitals since I was 33, it took about 8 years for the docs to figure out it was sarcoid. And I was a happy user of vitamins before that time, and for the next 20 years. High vitamin D use did not prevent or resolve the problems.

I do hope you stay healthy. But I don't believe it has much to do with Vitamin D use.

31 posted on 07/10/2011 6:33:16 PM PDT by slowhandluke (It's hard to be cynical enough in this age.)
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To: lonestar

actually, i was thinking about the lack of sunshine if the players are inside all the time...


32 posted on 07/10/2011 6:37:05 PM PDT by stefanbatory (Insert witty tagline here)
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To: slowhandluke
I have a friend with sarcoidosis--her doc has her on 50,000 of D once a week. I don't know if it's D or D3.

Hope you continue to get better.

33 posted on 07/10/2011 6:49:37 PM PDT by lonestar (It takes a village of idiots to elect a village idiot.)
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To: slowhandluke

My understanding is those with “sarcoid” have problems with Vitamin D...so I think you are the exception...not the rule...


34 posted on 07/10/2011 7:03:03 PM PDT by goodnesswins
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To: goodnesswins
No, I and other sarcoid patients aren't the exception. I think it's just that sarcoid folks have such severe troubles with Vitamin D, that the docs have to acknowledge it, while still insisting it doesn't work that way for anybody else.

I know folks with Rheumatoid Arthritis for whom avoiding Vitamin D, and the rest of the MP, is a cure.

The video at this link explains how it works across the spectrum of auto-immune troubles. http://mpkb.org/home/publications/proal_congress_on_autoimmunity_2008

Early results of the MP are reported here. http://mpkb.org/home/publications/marshall_american_academy_of_environmental_medicine_2006

35 posted on 07/11/2011 7:20:10 AM PDT by slowhandluke (It's hard to be cynical enough in this age.)
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