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Yale Scientists Discover the Last Living Dinosaur
CTV ^ | Sat Jul. 16 2011

Posted on 07/16/2011 4:39:22 PM PDT by nickcarraway

A fossil discovered in Montana has given new momentum to the hypothesis that dinosaurs were thriving right up until a devastating meteor hit Earth 65 million years ago, causing their extinction.

Scientists from Yale University have found what is believed to be the youngest dinosaur fossil ever found, thought to be from just before the mass extinction took place.

The discovery, described in a study published in the online edition of the journal Biology Letters, contradicts the theory that the dinosaurs slowly went extinct before the cosmic impact.

The fossil -- a 45-centimetre horn believed to be from a triceratops -- was found in Montana's Hell Creek formation. It was located just below the K-T boundary, the band of the Earth's crust that represents the time period in which the meteor struck.

One of the main problems with the meteor theory has been the lack of any non-avian dinosaur fossils buried within 10 feet of the boundary -- known as the 'three metre gap.'

The absence of fossils, some paleontologists say, indicates dinosaurs were already extinct when the cosmic impact occurred.

Yale paleontologist Tyler Lyson, lead author of the study, says the new discovery proves otherwise.

"To all of our surprise the boundary was no more than 13 centimetres above this horn, and the significance is this indicates that at least some dinosaurs were doing quite well in this locale at the time of the meteor impact," he told CTV.ca.

There is evidence that avian dinosaurs thrived up to and into the K-T boundary. In fact, they are believed to have survived the meteor and evolved into modern-day birds.

(Excerpt) Read more at ottawa.ctv.ca ...


TOPICS: Miscellaneous; Pets/Animals; Science
KEYWORDS: chicxulub; chondrite; cretaceoustertiary; devilstail; dinosaur; dinosaurs; godsgravesglyphs; montana; paleontology
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1 posted on 07/16/2011 4:39:24 PM PDT by nickcarraway
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To: nickcarraway
Yale Scientists Discover what they think may be the Last Living Dinosaur

There. Fixed it. :-)

2 posted on 07/16/2011 4:45:51 PM PDT by DeoVindiceSicSemperTyrannis (Want to make $$$? It's easy! Use FR as a platform to pimp your blog for hits!!!)
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To: nickcarraway

I hereby call “NO HT PICS!”


3 posted on 07/16/2011 4:46:46 PM PDT by freedumb2003 (Herman Cain 2012)
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To: nickcarraway

One specimen and they project it as “proof”?

Imagine the nonsense you could postulate if one specimen were scientifically sufficient?


4 posted on 07/16/2011 4:49:10 PM PDT by G Larry (I dream of a day when a man is judged by the content of his character)
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To: nickcarraway

Well, Human beings are not going to be found in the proper geological layer either.

Those not killed by the first strike might take a while to die. It could have taken hundreds of years to kill them all.

I think there was more than one reason why the giant reptiles and giant mammals died out. Of course, the asteroid/comet ? could have caused several effects.

It’s a good thing they are all dead. Can you imagine having to pick up the POOP?


5 posted on 07/16/2011 4:49:50 PM PDT by UCANSEE2 (Lame and ill-informed post)
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To: freedumb2003

My thoughts exactly! We’ll see how long it takes for someone to post one anyway.


6 posted on 07/16/2011 4:50:45 PM PDT by tal hajus (ever the cynic)
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To: nickcarraway
What happened to Gansus, a duck like bird supposedly living 110 million years ago and considered a relative of modern birds?
7 posted on 07/16/2011 4:51:09 PM PDT by count-your-change (You don't have be brilliant, not being stupid is enough.)
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To: DeoVindiceSicSemperTyrannis
Yale Scientists Discover what they think may be the Last Living DEAD Dinosaur

There. Fixed it. :-)

8 posted on 07/16/2011 4:51:40 PM PDT by UCANSEE2 (Lame and ill-informed post)
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To: nickcarraway
A fossil discovered in Montana has given new momentum to the hypothesis that dinosaurs were thriving right up until a devastating meteor hit Earth 65 million years ago, causing their extinction.

I'm not sure finding one is evidence that they were "thriving". I'm of the mind that they were on their way to extincton and the asteroid impact was the tipping point.
9 posted on 07/16/2011 4:51:44 PM PDT by cripplecreek (Remember the River Raisin! (look it up))
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To: nickcarraway
"Tyler Lyson’s general research interests are focused around his field work in the Late Cretaceous Hell Creek Formation of southwestern North Dakota."

Looks like they may have moved to SE MT - Glendive.

10 posted on 07/16/2011 4:52:55 PM PDT by Paladin2
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To: G Larry
Imagine the nonsense you could postulate if one specimen were scientifically sufficient?

There are ZERO specimens of dark matter, dark energy, and black holes, and yet they insist those things exist.

11 posted on 07/16/2011 4:54:25 PM PDT by UCANSEE2 (Lame and ill-informed post)
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To: cripplecreek

Well, a 65 miles across rock racing at the earth at 17,000 miles per hour plus would cause a rather sever stress on the animals and their environment.


12 posted on 07/16/2011 4:54:40 PM PDT by MHGinTN (Some, believing they can't be deceived, it's nigh impossible to convince them when they're deceived.)
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To: nickcarraway
My personal theory: the meteor event had an effect on the Earth's oxygen levels, lowering them for some long while.

Dinosaurs, being warm blooded, needed a minimum oxygen level. The avian dinosaurs had evolved bigger lungs to cope with the increased oxygen demands of flying, and so were better able to cope with a lowered oxygen level.

How else to explain dinos all dying off, on separated continents, even dinos that spent all their time in the ocean?

13 posted on 07/16/2011 4:55:14 PM PDT by PapaBear3625 (When you've only heard lies your entire life, the truth sounds insane.)
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To: count-your-change
What happened to Gansus, a duck like bird supposedly living 110 million years ago and considered a relative of modern birds?

Chinese cooks with big block butcher knives..


14 posted on 07/16/2011 4:55:27 PM PDT by freedumb2003 (Herman Cain 2012)
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To: UCANSEE2

“Just below” the KT Boundary can mean it died days before or thousands of years before depending on any number of variables. Things like how far below the KT boundary, the type of sediment, how densely packed it is, etc.


15 posted on 07/16/2011 4:56:57 PM PDT by cripplecreek (Remember the River Raisin! (look it up))
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To: nickcarraway

I’m sorry but I’m gonna do it.. Is it Larry King or Helen Thomas?


16 posted on 07/16/2011 4:59:25 PM PDT by ColdOne (I miss my poochie... Tasha 2000~3/14/11)
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To: nickcarraway
he absence of fossils, some paleontologists say, indicates dinosaurs were already extinct when the cosmic impact occurred......Yale paleontologist Tyler Lyson, lead author of the study, says the new discovery proves otherwise...."To all of our surprise the boundary was no more than 13 centimetres above this horn,

OK so this last Dinosaur was found thousands of years before the KT boundary, so that proves the meteor killed all Dinosaurs thousands of years before it hit??

uuuum OK,

So let me guess, That Wooly mammoth from 10,000 years found frozen in Siberia proves all Woolly Mammoths were driven extinct by the Tunguska impact in 1906

This Dino killed by the Meteor thing has ceased being science a long time ago

In Science you gather data and form a hypothesis

In fake science like this and global warming you form a hypothesis and try to shoehorn all data to make it fit.

17 posted on 07/16/2011 4:59:25 PM PDT by qam1 (There's been a huge party. All plates and the bottles are empty, all that's left is the bill to pay)
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To: nickcarraway
They apparently have a picture of this creature.


18 posted on 07/16/2011 5:00:38 PM PDT by WinOne4TheGipper
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To: cripplecreek
I'm of the mind that they were on their way to extincton

I agree.

The Earth used to be smaller, spun faster, and a higher oxygen content. Those things enabled the reptiles and mammals to grow to such extreme sizes. The Land masses might have been changing (moving up or down) and the oceans relocating much more than they do now.

Loss of breeding grounds, or feeding spots, and maybe viruses could have helped wipe them out. Over time, it became harder to carry their weight as gravity increased.

So... they went 'extinct'. Life is life. It just has different forms at different times to match the living conditions. Forms go extinct. Life doesn't.

19 posted on 07/16/2011 5:05:31 PM PDT by UCANSEE2 (Lame and ill-informed post)
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To: WinOne4TheGipper

18 flipping posts it took! gawd, FR has changed. either that or she is SO yesterday’s news.


20 posted on 07/16/2011 5:06:01 PM PDT by the invisib1e hand ("America will cease to be great when America ceases to be good." -- Welcome to deToqueville.)
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To: nickcarraway

Now that Bobby “Big” Byrd and Uncle Teddy are gone, who is the last surviving dinosaur?


21 posted on 07/16/2011 5:08:33 PM PDT by MIchaelTArchangel
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To: G Larry
One specimen and they project it as “proof”? Imagine the nonsense you could postulate if one specimen were scientifically sufficient?

In evidence, number does not equal quality. Quality is what counts.

One single hair could get you the death penalty in a crime, if that hair was properly verified.

Unless, of course, you're Casey Anthony.

22 posted on 07/16/2011 5:09:50 PM PDT by Talisker (History will show the Illuminati won the ultimate Darwin Award.)
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To: PapaBear3625
My personal theory: the meteor event had an effect on the Earth's oxygen levels, lowering them for some long while.

I agree.

A meteor/comet that large would punch a large hole in the ozone, and allow the atmosphere to escape into space. This would dilute the content, besides the other chemicals and gases that the meteor/comet and the explosion would ADD to it.

Death would probably come slow, with the creatures becoming erratic (losing their minds) from the lack of proper breathing atmosphere. Of course, this would all be dependent on their distance from the impact site.

23 posted on 07/16/2011 5:12:55 PM PDT by UCANSEE2 (Lame and ill-informed post)
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To: cripplecreek
“Just below” the KT Boundary can mean it died days before or thousands of years before depending on any number of variables. Things like how far below the KT boundary, the type of sediment, how densely packed it is, etc.

Thanks. I understand that. But they can't really tell for sure, can they?

24 posted on 07/16/2011 5:20:34 PM PDT by UCANSEE2 (Lame and ill-informed post)
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To: qam1

Paleontology has always been a competitive science with competing schools of thought trying to push their theory to acceptance.

My personal belief is somewhere between the two competing theories. I don’t think they were completely gone but were nearing extinction all by themselves. The fact that mammals were already on the rise seems to suggest that they were filling vacated ecological niches.

I also have problems with the animals that survived. Not all were aquatic dwellers or burrowers. Even some aquatic dwellers like alligators are shallow water dwellers and would have to survive years of super heating or super cooling depending on the global effects. Lots of insects that aren’t burrowers or swimmers survived.

I think it was a real bad time but not as bad is the impact extinctionists need it to be to exterminate a world full of dinosaurs.


25 posted on 07/16/2011 5:20:48 PM PDT by cripplecreek (Remember the River Raisin! (look it up))
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To: UCANSEE2

Its all theoretical till somebody invents a time machine and proves it.


26 posted on 07/16/2011 5:22:25 PM PDT by cripplecreek (Remember the River Raisin! (look it up))
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To: UCANSEE2

Your analysis of fluid dynamics is too simple. I believe that the Flintstones Show proves that Man and Dinosaurs co-existed.


27 posted on 07/16/2011 5:23:09 PM PDT by Paladin2
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To: WinOne4TheGipper

In after the Helen Thomas pic!


28 posted on 07/16/2011 5:23:10 PM PDT by BenKenobi (Honkeys for Herman!)
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To: UCANSEE2
You are either trying to pull our collective legs (most likely) or you attended the Academy of Creative Scientific Factology.

As for the hyperbolic headline, it was written by some hack in a cubbyhole, not a scientist. I can find nothing in the article itself that says what the headline claims.

29 posted on 07/16/2011 5:28:37 PM PDT by Bernard Marx
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To: freedumb2003
That's either a headless frog with a long tail or Extra Crispy Colonel Sanders Chicken. Depends on whether it's coming or going.

And what kind of headline says the youngest living dinosaur has been dead 65 million years? Is it young? living? or very old and very dead?

I want my Gansus not the Geico lizard in a feather boa looking like a cross between Jesse Ventura and Swamp Thing.

30 posted on 07/16/2011 5:34:52 PM PDT by count-your-change (You don't have be brilliant, not being stupid is enough.)
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To: cripplecreek

With the Dino-Asteroid theory unfortunately politics and the media got involved. It kind of caught fire with the anti-nuke movement in the 1980s (Nuclear winter killed the Dinos so just image what it can do to you kids so join us in stopping Reagan) and it’s used a lot to try and re-ignite the myth of the noble savage (If a meteor killed the dinos then maybe one or more killed all those animals instead of the peace loving ancient humans).

It also has a coolness factor, the dinos just capture our imagination and being wiped out by a meteor just has that great Hollywood type ending.

Those things keep the impact hypothesis going, despite the mounting evidence against it.


31 posted on 07/16/2011 5:53:51 PM PDT by qam1 (There's been a huge party. All plates and the bottles are empty, all that's left is the bill to pay)
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To: WinOne4TheGipper; The Invisible Hand
I scrolled down s-l-o-w-l-y, preparing to queue up a different-but-much-smaller likeness...then - BOOM!
32 posted on 07/16/2011 5:54:51 PM PDT by floozy22
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Thanks nickcarraway.

Imagine having *no* specimen at all, and not bothering to look for any, and then arguing about what constitutes proof? Just adding to the catalog, not sending a general distribution.

To all -- please ping me to other topics which are appropriate for the GGG list.
 

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33 posted on 07/16/2011 5:55:59 PM PDT by SunkenCiv (Yes, as a matter of fact, it is that time again -- https://secure.freerepublic.com/donate/)
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To: cripplecreek
“Just below” the KT Boundary can mean it died days before or thousands of years before depending on any number of variables. Things like how far below the KT boundary, the type of sediment, how densely packed it is, etc.

It could even be a few million years. According to the history channel, there is a desert in Chile where the topsoil hasn't changed much for several million years.

34 posted on 07/16/2011 6:03:48 PM PDT by EVO X
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The preponderance of evidence is, continues to be, and always has been, that the dinosaur die-off was basically immediate and due to the impact of at least one large object. This doesn’t preclude the possibility that the impactor arrived in more than one consecutive chunk, or that it came apart a very short time before impact. There has never been any evidence at all for gradual extinction (which is an oxymoron), and there’s no evidence that some kind of (undocumented, despite claims to the contrary) volcanism played any role at all. The same tired old arguments that were refuted twenty years ago keep getting trotted out by the same tired old unreconstructed Darwinian gradualists in the UK and by their eastern seaboard lackeys.

Impact forensic evidence announced
Jeff Poling
http://www.dinosauria.com/jdp/impact/forensic.html

[snip] When the object from space slammed into the earth, it punched a hole in the ground that, within minutes, rebounded to hurl superheated rock and steam back into the atmosphere. Some of the material was blown into space, while the rest fell to earth creating a parabolic swath of destruction that incinerated North America... Using seismic instruments to measure ballistics more than a kilometer below the Yucatan, the scientists found evidence that the initial crater gouged by the object was around 100 km in diameter. From this, the scientists concluded the object was 10 to 14 km across. They estimate that if the object was an asteroid, it was moving at 20 km/s. If it was a comet, it slammed into the earth going 65 km/s. [/snip]

[snip] 11/19/98 — A meteorite from the Cretaceous/Tertiary boundary (FRANK T. KYTE, Nature 396: 6708): Cretaceous/Tertiary boundary sediments are now widely recognized to contain the record of a large asteroid or comet impact event, probably at the site of the Chicxulub crater on the Yucatan peninsula. After nearly two decades of intensive research, however, much remains unknown about the specific nature of the projectile and of the impact event itself. Here we describe a 2.5-mm fossil meteorite found in sediments retrieved from the Cretaceous/Tertiary boundary in the North Pacific Ocean that we infer may be a piece of the projectile responsible for the Chicxulub crater. Geochemical and petrographic analyses of this meteorite indicate that it probably came from a typical metal- and sulphide-rich carbonaceous chondrite rather than the porous aggregate type of interplanetary dust considered typical of cometary materials. The fact that meteorite survival should be enhanced by impacts at low (asteroidal) velocities also implies that this meteorite had an asteroidal rather than a cometary origin. [/snip]

Researchers Study Ancient Rocks To Test Theory on End of Dinosaurs>
by Halimah Abdullah
July 9, 1997
http://query.nytimes.com/search/article-page.html?res=9C01E6D91239F930A15751C0A9679C8B63&fta=y

[snip] “If there was a major fire after the meteorite hit the earth,” Dr. Wolbach said, “we would see soot in samples from Denmark and around the world. We looked at sedimentary rocks 65 million years old from other geographically distant sites and found soot in them, too. The fire was a global phenomenon.” [/snip]

‘Quick’ demise for the dinosaurs
by BBC News Online’s Jonathan Amos
Thursday, 8 March, 2001, 19:01 GMT
http://news.bbc.co.uk/hi/english/sci/tech/newsid_1209000/1209870.stm

[snip] The evidence comes from a study of rocks in Italy and Tunisia. The work lends support to the idea that a single, giant impact of an asteroid or comet was responsible for the mass extinction of life that occurred 65 million years ago... Sujoy Mukhopadhyay and colleagues studied sedimentary rocks that mark the so-called K-T boundary... 70% of all life, including the dinosaurs, suddenly disappears from the fossil record... They analysed the amount of helium-3 in the rocks of the K-T boundary... The research suggests the K-T boundary was deposited in about 10,000 years. He said the short period lent support to the theory that the dinosaurs were wiped out in a sudden, catastrophic event such as the impact of an extraterrestrial body. The constant rate of accumulation of helium-3 also indicates that the impactor was not part of a comet shower or bombardment... “The Deccan Traps erupted over much longer timescales — over 500,000 years or more. If the recovery of life starts after only 10,000 years, it is hard for us to see how the traps are influencing the mass extinction.” [/snip]

Dino asteroid led to ‘global devastation’
The impact would have shaken the affected planet
By Helen Briggs
BBC News Online
Thursday, 22 November, 2001, 19:32 GMT
http://news.bbc.co.uk/hi/english/sci/tech/newsid_1670000/1670035.stm

[snip] The asteroid thought to have wiped out the dinosaurs destroyed plant life thousands of kilometres from where it struck, say scientists. Fossils uncovered in New Zealand point to major disturbances in climate that led to the death of most trees and flowering plants. Clues from the plant fossil record suggest that even the Southern Hemisphere experienced an artificial winter, acid rain, and raging forest fires. This is the first clear fossil evidence for destruction of plant life so far from the Mexico coast, where the space object is believed to have landed. Dr Timothy Flannery, an expert at the South Australian Museum in Adelaide, told BBC News Online: “The asteroid devastated pretty much everything. This was a case of global devastation rather than North American catastrophe.” [/snip]


35 posted on 07/16/2011 6:14:04 PM PDT by SunkenCiv (Yes, as a matter of fact, it is that time again -- https://secure.freerepublic.com/donate/)
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To: count-your-change

36 posted on 07/16/2011 6:36:11 PM PDT by NorthStarStateConservative (From the land where nothing is allowed.)
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To: nickcarraway

Pfft, everyone knows that Denver was the last dinosaur.


37 posted on 07/16/2011 6:46:45 PM PDT by Echo4C (We have it in our power to begin the world over again. --Thomas Paine)
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To: floozy22

Yeah, it sort of just hits you.:)


38 posted on 07/16/2011 7:00:30 PM PDT by WinOne4TheGipper
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To: NorthStarStateConservative

Huh?


39 posted on 07/16/2011 7:23:19 PM PDT by count-your-change (You don't have be brilliant, not being stupid is enough.)
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To: count-your-change

Wrong thread, sorry.


40 posted on 07/16/2011 7:59:25 PM PDT by NorthStarStateConservative (From the land where nothing is allowed.)
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To: cripplecreek

You would expect to see lots of fossils right up to the boundary, in fact, if all died at once there should be ample evidence. I would agree with you that the asteroid was the last straw. However the lack of fossils just after the strike shows a widespread extinction combination of events.


41 posted on 07/16/2011 7:59:58 PM PDT by JimSEA
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To: Paladin2
"Flinstones"

I'm still going with Alley Oop riding Dinny the Dinosaur. Dinny survived the meteor (hung out underwater with the Loch Ness monster) and had a very long life span.

42 posted on 07/16/2011 8:03:30 PM PDT by driftless2
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To: nickcarraway

This should have been posted under Comedy.


43 posted on 07/16/2011 8:07:33 PM PDT by editor-surveyor (Going 'EGYPT' - 2012!)
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To: UCANSEE2

>> “I think there was more than one reason why the giant reptiles and giant mammals died out.” <<

.
Must have been, since a bunch of them were still very much alive when the temple at Ankor Wat was built, otherwise how would they have gotten those carvings so perfect?
.


44 posted on 07/16/2011 8:11:22 PM PDT by editor-surveyor (Going 'EGYPT' - 2012!)
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To: MHGinTN

>> “Well, a 65 miles across rock racing at the earth at 17,000 miles per hour plus would cause a rather sever stress on the animals and their environment.” <<

.
The very first Montana Derby... ( oh, that was Kentucky...)


45 posted on 07/16/2011 8:14:58 PM PDT by editor-surveyor (Going 'EGYPT' - 2012!)
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To: BenKenobi; WinOne4TheGipper; ColdOne; tal hajus
In after the Helen Thomas pic!

finally......
please...keep 'em small, on dial-up.
put....jpg" width="XXX">....thanks. :)


46 posted on 07/16/2011 8:35:48 PM PDT by skinkinthegrass (You do not have to smear (Pharaoh / Imam / DumboEars) Obama w/ lies....the truth does a fine job. :)
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To: editor-surveyor
when the temple at Ankor Wat was built

And when was that?

47 posted on 07/16/2011 11:55:02 PM PDT by UCANSEE2 (Lame and ill-informed post)
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To: JimSEA

The comet/meteor/asteroid strike didn’t kill all the giant reptiles/mammals.

But, it killed their food.


48 posted on 07/16/2011 11:57:05 PM PDT by UCANSEE2 (Lame and ill-informed post)
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To: Bernard Marx
You are either trying to pull our collective legs

Do you have a better answer?

49 posted on 07/17/2011 12:02:59 AM PDT by UCANSEE2 (Lame and ill-informed post)
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To: cripplecreek

Since 99% of all species that have ever existed on Earth have gone extinct, why is it that the dinosaurs going extinct is such a big deal?


50 posted on 07/17/2011 12:05:15 AM PDT by UCANSEE2 (Lame and ill-informed post)
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