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A Drink a Day May Keep Alzheimer's Away (Analysis of 143 studies shows risk decreased by 23%)
Medscape Medical News ^ | August 26, 2011 | Fran Lowry

Posted on 08/26/2011 12:49:36 PM PDT by Stoat

A Drink a Day May Keep Alzheimer's Away

Fran Lowry

 

August 26, 2011 — Light to moderate drinking seems to reduce the risk for dementia and cognitive decline, according to a new study published in the August issue of Neuropsychiatric Disease and Treatment.

A meta-analysis of 143 studies on the effects of alcohol on the brain showed that moderate drinking, defined as no more than 2 drinks a day for a man and no more than 1 drink a day for a woman, reduced the risk for Alzheimer's disease and other forms of dementia by 23%.

"It doesn't seem to matter if it's beer, wine, or spirits, as long as the drinking was moderate," Edward J. Neafsey, PhD, from the Department of Molecular Pharmacology and Therapeutics at Loyola University Medical Center, Maywood, Illinois, told Medscape Medical News.

Dr. Edward J. Neafsey

Dr. Neafsey and coauthor Michael A. Collins, PhD, became interested in seeing whether alcohol might be protective of human brains after their experiments showed that rat brains exposed to low doses of alcohol for a few days demonstrated resiliency when subsequently treated with a toxin.

"If the rat brain slices were treated for 5 or 6 days with low alcohol and then the toxin was administered, there was hardly any damage, whereas if they didn't get the pretreatment with alcohol, there was significant damage. This led us to ask if there was anything in the human literature that would fit with this protective effect of alcohol," Dr. Neafsey explained.

The researchers reviewed studies dating from 1977 up to the present. The studies fell into 2 categories: those that provided ratios of risk between drinkers and nondrinkers (n = 74) and those that rated cognition in drinkers as "better," "no different," or "worse" than cognition in nondrinkers (n = 69).

Heavy Drinking a Different Story

Light to moderate drinking conferred a similar benefit, but heavy drinking (more than 3 - 5 drinks/day) was associated with a nonsignificantly higher risk for dementia and cognitive impairment.

Most of the studies did not distinguish between the different types of alcohol, but in a few studies, wine appeared to be more beneficial than beer or spirits. "It really seemed to be that alcohol per se was protective, not the type, because the few studies that did make the distinction reported no difference among the effects of the different types of alcohol," Dr. Neafsey said.

The protective effect of moderate drinking held after adjusting for age, education, sex, and smoking.

A number of explanations for the protective effect of moderate alcohol have been proposed. Some dementias are related to cardiovascular system problems, such as atherosclerosis, and alcohol may be protective because it raises the level of high-density lipoprotein (the good) cholesterol and might improve blood flow in the brain.

One theory that Dr. Neafsey and Dr. Collins are working on now holds that alcohol acts as a mild stressor for brain cells and "preconditions" them, making them better able to ward off stress.

"Alcohol doesn't kill the brain cells, but it's a slight stress. When the cells are exposed they increase levels of various protective compounds, so...they are prepared when something more stressful that might kill or damage them comes along. The theory is called 'preconditioning,' where a mild stress given a few days before a severe stress causes a significant protection."

Understanding the mechanism of alcohol's protective effect could lead to a treatment to prevent cognitive impairment and dementias, Dr. Neafsey said.

"Whether it's treatment with a pill or a lifestyle change, if we could understand the mechanism, it would improve our ability to deal with these illnesses," he said.

Novel Approach

Medscape Medical News asked Anton P. Porsteinsson, MD, the William B. and Sheila Konar professor of psychiatry at the University of Rochester School of Medicine, New York, to comment on this study.

"This is a well-done meta analysis. The findings are consistent with other meta analyses that have been done. Am I tremendously surprised at the findings? No, because they are looking at the same pool of studies," Dr. Porsteinsson said.

"The fact that they approach it in slightly different ways and yet find similar outcomes makes me confident that this is what the data are actually signaling to us: that very modest alcohol consumption is protective," he said.

The next step is to figure out how moderate alcohol consumption exerts its protective effect.

"Is it some direct effect of the alcohol on the brain? Are people who consume moderate amounts of alcohol different in some way, in their diet, or their level of exercise? Are low concentrations of alcohol neuroprotective? Is it through some metabolic impact?" Dr. Porsteinsson said.

Also interesting was that alcohol appeared to protect against all types of dementia, he said.

"This makes it less likely to have a direct effect on beta amyloid or tau, but more of a global effect. It is an interesting review. They made it a pleasure to read."

The study was supported by the National Institutes of Health. Dr. Neafsey, Dr. Collins, and Dr. Porsteinsson have disclosed no relevant financial relationships.

Neuropsychiatric Dis Treat. 2011;7:465-484. Abstract


TOPICS: Food; Health/Medicine; Science
KEYWORDS: alcohol; alzheimers; beerlist; beerping; booze; health; medicine; neurology; oenology; psychiatry; wine; winelist; wineping
Related article:

 

More Evidence Moderate Alcohol Reduces Cognitive Impairment

Pam Harrison

http://www.medscape.com/viewarticle/740233

April 5, 2011 (Toronto, Ontario) — Heavy alcohol consumption is associated with an increased risk for cognitive impairment, whereas light to moderate alcohol consumption reduces the risk, a new study shows.

Leung-Wing Chu, MD, from the University of Hong Kong, China, and colleagues found that the average weekly alcohol consumption in the cognitively impaired was significantly higher at a mean of 861.89 grams per week than that consumed by the normal cognition group at a mean of 241.21 grams per week (P < .001). Mini-Mental Status Examination (MMSE) scores were also higher for light to moderate drinkers compared with both nondrinkers and heavy drinkers.

In this analysis, more than 30 minutes a day of exercise was also independently associated with a 60% lower risk for cognitive impairment vs no exercise, with an adjusted odds ratio of 0.40 (P = .02). Those who reported doing fewer than 30 minutes of exercise a day still had a 48% lower risk for cognitive impairment at an adjusted odds ratio of 0.52 (P = .05).

The results were presented here at the Alzheimer's Disease International 26th International Conference.

Chinese in Hong Kong

For the study, the authors recruited a cross-sectional sample of 314 Southern Chinese older adults (mean age, 79.9 years) in Hong Kong. The MMSE along with participants' social demographic status, the presence of comorbid disease, and alcohol drinking habits were ascertained in a face-to-face interview. Heavy drinkers were defined as individuals who drank in excess of 400 grams of alcohol for men and more than 280 grams of alcohol for women. Light and moderate drinkers consumed less than 400 grams for men and less than 280 grams for women.

Brandy containing 45% alcohol would deliver about 21 grams of alcohol in 1 drink: wine at 12% with about 9.6 grams of alcohol per glass and beer at 4% with about 10.5 grams in a can. Based on logistic regression analyses, researchers found that light drinkers had an adjusted odds ratio of 0.28 for cognitive impairment (P = .004), whereas moderate drinkers had an adjusted odds ratio of 0.15 for cognitive impairment (P < .001).

In contrast, heavy drinkers had a 4.94 times greater adjusted odds ratio for cognitive impairment (P = .001).

"This is a cross-sectional study and we cannot say for sure that there is a link between cause and effect, but in this small study, we found that heavy alcohol consumption is associated with increased risk for cognitive impairment, whereas light to moderate consumption is associated with reduced risk in older Chinese people,” Dr. Chu concluded.

Confirmatory Study

Session chair, Amos Korczyn, MD, chairman, CONy World Congress on Controversies in Neurology, toldMedscape Medical News that this was another "confirmatory" study that once again demonstrated the harmful effects of heavy drinking on cognition.

"We have known for years that in western populations some drinking is good for you and a lot of drinking is very bad for you, so we recommend that everybody drink a glass of wine every day — maybe 2 and maybe even 3 — but beyond that, it is detrimental. Now this has been confirmed among the Chinese, which is also very interesting."

Alzheimer's Disease International (ADI) 26th International Conference: Abstract O051. Presented March 28, 2011

 

1 posted on 08/26/2011 12:49:46 PM PDT by Stoat
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To: knews_hound; decimon; Lazamataz; neverdem; HungarianGypsy; MeekOneGOP
Alcoholic_cat_2
2 posted on 08/26/2011 12:52:50 PM PDT by Stoat (If you want a vision of the future, imagine a Birkenstock stamping on a human face... forever)
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To: Stoat
'Two drinks a day'? Works for me...

... that's one down the hatch.

3 posted on 08/26/2011 12:57:14 PM PDT by evets (beer)
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To: Stoat; neverdem; DvdMom; grey_whiskers; Ladysmith; Roos_Girl; Silentgypsy; conservative cat; ...

Thanks, Stoat.

Cheers ping.


4 posted on 08/26/2011 1:03:47 PM PDT by decimon
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To: All
An abstract as well as a link to a free PDF download of the complete 20 page original article as published in Neuropsychiatric Disease And Treatment Journal is available here

Moderate alcohol consumption and cognitive risk

5 posted on 08/26/2011 1:09:56 PM PDT by Stoat (If you want a vision of the future, imagine a Birkenstock stamping on a human face... forever)
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To: decimon
Thanks, Stoat.

 

You're quite welcome, and thank you very much for pinging your list :-)

 

6 posted on 08/26/2011 1:13:09 PM PDT by Stoat (If you want a vision of the future, imagine a Birkenstock stamping on a human face... forever)
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To: evets

I actually have a Brandy snifter that big.

Seriesly!

I kinda sorta have a collection of old bottles, beer mugs, and interesting glass items.


7 posted on 08/26/2011 1:15:46 PM PDT by djf (One of the few FReepers who NEVER clicked the "dead weasel" thread!! But may not last much longer...)
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To: Stoat

Okay - two drinks = 23% then four should = 46% and eight - waitaminnit~! WeHeR’s tH’ gLaSs?????


8 posted on 08/26/2011 1:15:55 PM PDT by SkyDancer (You know, they invented wheelbarrows to teach government employees how to walk on their hind legs.)
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To: Stoat

2 drinks a day ... I’m up to the year 2525 already

“Alzheimer’s Disease International (ADI) 26th International Conference: Abstract O051. Presented March 28, 2011”

Dammit, how did I forget to attend this conference?


9 posted on 08/26/2011 1:19:41 PM PDT by fnord (Republicans are just the right-wing of the left-wing of American politics)
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To: Stoat
I guess Cliff Clavin was right.

Cliff expounds his "Buffalo Theory" to Norm:

“Well, you see, Norm, it’s like this. A herd of buffalo can only move as fast as the slowest buffalo. And when the herd is hunted, it’s the slowest and weakest ones at the back that are killed first. This natural selection is good for the herd as a whole, because the general speed and health of the whole group keeps improving by the regular killing of the weakest members.

In much the same way, the human brain can only operate as fast as the slowest brain cells. Now, as we know, excessive intake of alcohol kills brain cells. But naturally, it attacks the slowest and weakest brain cells first. In this way, regular consumption of beer eliminates the weaker brain cells, making the brain a faster and more efficient machine.

And that, Norm, is why you always feel smarter after a few beers.”

10 posted on 08/26/2011 1:20:54 PM PDT by eggman (Presidential erase - Nov. 6, 2012. The end of an error.)
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To: djf
Ha ha, that's great... but do you have DAS BOOT!

11 posted on 08/26/2011 1:25:04 PM PDT by evets (beer)
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To: quantim; NautiNurse
 
12 posted on 08/26/2011 2:03:04 PM PDT by Stoat (If you want a vision of the future, imagine a Birkenstock stamping on a human face... forever)
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To: Stoat

rarely drink, so what is a good brandy and how can you fix it to make it taste better?


13 posted on 08/26/2011 2:08:40 PM PDT by Taffini ( Mr. Pippen and Mr. Waffles do not approve and neither do I)
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To: Stoat

Not only keeping it away but chasing Alzheimer’s outta the state on a beer truck....errrrPP!


14 posted on 08/26/2011 2:11:09 PM PDT by count-your-change (You don't have be brilliant, not being stupid is enough.)
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To: Stoat
I am sorry but that is grams of liquid?
Thank you
15 posted on 08/26/2011 2:15:22 PM PDT by Steve Van Doorn (*in my best Eric Cartman voice* 'I love you, guys')
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To: Steve Van Doorn
I am sorry but that is grams of liquid? 
 

 

Yes. You'll frequently find liquid measures expressed in grams instead of ounces in medical parlance.   Here's a convenient chart which may help in a conversion from grams to ounces:

 

Ounce To Gram Chart



Ounce Gram Ounce Gram Ounce Gram Ounce Gram
1 28.3495231 26 737.0876006 51 1445.825678 76 2154.563756
2 56.6990462 27 765.4371237 52 1474.175201 77 2182.913279
3 85.0485693 28 793.7866468 53 1502.524724 78 2211.262802
4 113.3980924 29 822.1361699 54 1530.874247 79 2239.612325
5 141.7476155 30 850.485693 55 1559.223771 80 2267.961848
6 170.0971386 31 878.8352161 56 1587.573294 81 2296.311371
7 198.4466617 32 907.1847392 57 1615.922817 82 2324.660894
8 226.7961848 33 935.5342623 58 1644.27234 83 2353.010417
9 255.1457079 34 963.8837854 59 1672.621863 84 2381.35994
10 283.495231 35 992.2333085 60 1700.971386 85 2409.709464
11 311.8447541 36 1020.582832 61 1729.320909 86 2438.058987
12 340.1942772 37 1048.932355 62 1757.670432 87 2466.40851
13 368.5438003 38 1077.281878 63 1786.019955 88 2494.758033
14 396.8933234 39 1105.631401 64 1814.369478 89 2523.107556
15 425.2428465 40 1133.980924 65 1842.719002 90 2551.457079
16 453.5923696 41 1162.330447 66 1871.068525 100 2834.95231
17 481.9418927 42 1190.67997 67 1899.418048 125 3543.690388
18 510.2914158 43 1219.029493 68 1927.767571 150 4252.428465
19 538.6409389 44 1247.379016 69 1956.117094 175 4961.166543
20 566.990462 45 1275.72854 70 1984.466617 200 5669.90462
21 595.3399851 46 1304.078063 71 2012.81614 250 7087.380775
22 623.6895082 47 1332.427586 72 2041.165663 300 8504.85693
23 652.0390313 48 1360.777109 73 2069.515186 500 14174.76155
24 680.3885544 49 1389.126632 74 2097.864709 750 21262.14233
25 708.7380775 50 1417.476155 75 2126.214233 1000 28349.5231

 

Thank you

 

You're quite welcome, and I hope that this might be of some help :-)

16 posted on 08/26/2011 4:55:03 PM PDT by Stoat (If you want a vision of the future, imagine a Birkenstock stamping on a human face... forever)
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To: Stoat

That does it... I’m heading out and get ma’ beer. I earned it today!


17 posted on 08/26/2011 4:56:26 PM PDT by Ladysmith (The evil that's happening in this country is the cancer of socialism...It kills the human spirit.)
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To: Stoat

That’s good to know...as I sit here with my glass of Chardonnay...


18 posted on 08/26/2011 4:57:53 PM PDT by ContraryMary (Obama = Carter redux)
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To: Stoat
You'll frequently find liquid measures expressed in grams instead of ounces in medical parlance.

How does that reconcile with liquids of different densities?

19 posted on 08/26/2011 5:13:52 PM PDT by meyer (We will not sit down and shut up.)
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To: Taffini
rarely drink, so what is a good brandy and how can you fix it to make it taste better?

 

I confess that I also rarely drink and so I should leave the recommendation of specific brands to people who are more in the league of spirit connoisseur  than I am.

Of course there are the famous, expensive brands like Hennesy which will delight most people but as far as the lesser-known and lesser-priced brandies I'm afraid I'd be hard pressed to recommend one over another merely because I haven't tried many of them.

As to mixing brandies in a cocktail there are a variety of web pages with many recipes available. Hopefully these links might serve to get you started.:

 

Brandy Cocktail Recipes - Index of Cocktails and Mixed Drinks with Brandy and Cognac

 

brandy cocktail recipes - Google Search

20 posted on 08/26/2011 5:14:38 PM PDT by Stoat (If you want a vision of the future, imagine a Birkenstock stamping on a human face... forever)
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To: meyer

Oops - I think that the conversion chart (grams to ounces) is dealing with weight ounces, not the liquid measure of ounces. As in, 16 ounces to the pound, rather than 8 ounces to the cup.


21 posted on 08/26/2011 5:18:04 PM PDT by meyer (We will not sit down and shut up.)
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To: meyer
You'll frequently find liquid measures expressed in grams instead of ounces in medical parlance.

How does that reconcile with liquids of different densities? 

 

Prescriptions involving liquids can be expressed in a variety of ways, but since in a given instance you're going to be referring to a single substance, it's just a matter of mathematical conversion from one mode of expression to another. 

22 posted on 08/26/2011 5:23:02 PM PDT by Stoat (If you want a vision of the future, imagine a Birkenstock stamping on a human face... forever)
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To: meyer
Oops - I think that the conversion chart (grams to ounces) is dealing with weight ounces, not the liquid measure of ounces. As in, 16 ounces to the pound, rather than 8 ounces to the cup.

 

Yes, you're right! My bad...I missed lunch today ;-)

Here's a fluid ounces to grams calculator:

 

Convert US fluid ounce to gram - Conversion of Measurement Units

 

It makes a difference....dry ounce conversion is shown in the chart as 8 ounces equalling approx. 226.8 grams whereas the fluid ounces calculator gives us 236.5882375 grams for eight fluid ounces.

Thanks for catching my error :-)

23 posted on 08/26/2011 5:31:48 PM PDT by Stoat (If you want a vision of the future, imagine a Birkenstock stamping on a human face... forever)
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To: Stoat

You also have to consider the density of the liquid in question. For example, a liquid ounce of water weighs considerably less than a liquid ounce of, say, mercury. Most oils are a bit less dense than water and therefore weigh less per unit volume than water, while other liquids like nitric acid and vinigar weigh more than water for the same volume measurement.


24 posted on 08/26/2011 5:44:41 PM PDT by meyer (We will not sit down and shut up.)
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To: meyer

Yes, all very true. When dealing with different substances you’ve got to consider that in order to be accurate.


25 posted on 08/26/2011 5:51:25 PM PDT by Stoat (If you want a vision of the future, imagine a Birkenstock stamping on a human face... forever)
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To: Stoat
When dealing with different substances you’ve got to consider that in order to be accurate.

True. Sorry I missed your earlier reply - yes, if you're dealing with the same substance over and over, it's a simple ratio (g/cm3, lb/gal, etc.). So many threads, so little time.

26 posted on 08/26/2011 5:59:05 PM PDT by meyer (We will not sit down and shut up.)
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To: meyer
No worries! :-)  Here's a stylish adult beverage for you :-)

 

 

Cheers!  :-)

27 posted on 08/26/2011 6:24:55 PM PDT by Stoat (If you want a vision of the future, imagine a Birkenstock stamping on a human face... forever)
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To: Stoat

MMMmmmm....

In my mind, that’s Glenlivet on the rocks.


28 posted on 08/26/2011 6:43:17 PM PDT by meyer (We will not sit down and shut up.)
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To: Stoat

Arguably good for the heart too.

Caffeine and continual learning have also been reported to mitigate the onset of Alzheimer’s.


29 posted on 08/26/2011 6:50:46 PM PDT by Gene Eric (Your Hope has been Redistributed. Here's your damn Change!)
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To: Stoat

thanks, I’m hoping brandy taste better than wine...


30 posted on 08/26/2011 8:16:19 PM PDT by Taffini ( Mr. Pippen and Mr. Waffles do not approve and neither do I)
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To: Stoat

thanks Stoat


31 posted on 08/26/2011 8:19:01 PM PDT by Taffini ( Mr. Pippen and Mr. Waffles do not approve and neither do I)
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To: Taffini

You can always try a decent vodka mixed with juice or tonic. Iced tea and lemonade (or both mixed together) might do the trick. One shot of hard liquor is considered a “drink”, so in a tall glass it can be only a slight difference in taste.


32 posted on 08/27/2011 7:59:54 AM PDT by jdsteel (I like the way the words "Palin for President" make progressives apoplectic.)
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To: Taffini; Stoat

If you put some honey dew melon in a blender and add a splash of creme de menthe (sp?), it tastes very nice. How much creme de menthe constitutes one drink, I wonder. (Had a huge melon-patch bounty one year—everyone enjoyed this slushy mixture!)


33 posted on 08/27/2011 8:56:42 AM PDT by Silentgypsy (If this creature is not stopped it could make its way to Novosibirsk!)
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To: Stoat

By using Grams rather then liquid measurements you have to keep track of every substance your working with. It sounds unorthodox why would they do this?


34 posted on 08/27/2011 10:25:57 AM PDT by Steve Van Doorn (*in my best Eric Cartman voice* 'I love you, guys')
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To: Stoat
You'll frequently find liquid measures expressed in grams instead of ounces in medical parlance.

The metric system was created for the One World Government.

No Metric System

Liberia, Myanmar and the United States are holding out.

35 posted on 08/27/2011 10:45:41 AM PDT by Doe Eyes
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To: Stoat; decimon; texas booster

Thanks Stoat for the twofer, the metanalysis linked to its abstract! You’re a gentleman or a lady plus a scholar.

Thanks Stoat and decimon for the pings.


36 posted on 08/27/2011 7:13:43 PM PDT by neverdem (Xin loi minh oi)
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To: Taffini; jdsteel; Silentgypsy
thanks, I’m hoping brandy taste better than wine...

You're quite welcome, and if you don't care for any of the brandy cocktails or the excellent suggestions from jdsteel and Silentgypsy, you can try whisky, vodka, sherry, schnapps, rum, scotch, beer, and probably quite a few other options that I can't think of because I don't drink so much!  ;-)  The important thing to remember is this sentence from the article:

"It doesn't seem to matter if it's beer, wine, or spirits, as long as the drinking was moderate," Edward J. Neafsey, PhD, from the Department of Molecular Pharmacology and Therapeutics at Loyola University Medical Center, Maywood, Illinois, told Medscape Medical News.

if you're interested in finding something that you can enjoy, one option is going to a quality cocktail bar that has a knowledgeable bartender.  There, you can try different things without having to buy a whole bottle for each experiment :-)

A good bartender will also be able to make good recommendations for you based upon what you indicate that you already like.

Good luck :-)

37 posted on 08/27/2011 10:15:17 PM PDT by Stoat (If you want a vision of the future, imagine a Birkenstock stamping on a human face... forever)
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To: Silentgypsy
How much creme de menthe constitutes one drink, I wonder.

CDC - Frequently Asked Questions - Alcohol

What is a standard drink in the United States?
A standard drink is equal to 13.7 grams (0.6 ounces) of pure alcohol. Generally, this amount of pure alcohol is found in


38 posted on 08/27/2011 10:24:27 PM PDT by Stoat (If you want a vision of the future, imagine a Birkenstock stamping on a human face... forever)
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To: Steve Van Doorn
By using Grams rather then liquid measurements you have to keep track of every substance your working with. It sounds unorthodox why would they do this?

Speaking in terms of  how this relates to medicine, the recommended dosages of all medications are going to be determined on a case by case basis, meaning the dosage is specifically determined for each medication.  Since you're only dealing with one medication at a time, each one has a dosage and an administration protocol associated with it, so it's actually quite straightforward.

Since you're usually dealing with extremely small quantities of a given drug, the metric system is preferable because it allows far greater precision when dealing with these tiny quantities.  I'd rather have a medication expressed as ".05mg" than "1/516 oz".  Far easier to deal with when dosage changes are called for as well.  Frequently it's a merely a matter of moving the decimal and not much more.

39 posted on 08/27/2011 10:39:11 PM PDT by Stoat (If you want a vision of the future, imagine a Birkenstock stamping on a human face... forever)
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To: neverdem
Thanks Stoat for the twofer, the metanalysis linked to its abstract!

You're quite welcome & I'm delighted that you've found it to be helpful.  I always try to link to original source material whenever I post at FR, and I'm happy you found it useful :-)

You’re a gentleman or a lady plus a scholar.

I'm a proud, unapologetically-male stoat, and I thank you for your gracious compliments :-)

 

 

40 posted on 08/27/2011 10:46:33 PM PDT by Stoat (If you want a vision of the future, imagine a Birkenstock stamping on a human face... forever)
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To: Stoat

The three people I know who have alzheimers DO NOT DRINK and never did. Sad to think that one drink a day would have prevented such a miserable end to their lives.


41 posted on 08/28/2011 12:31:49 AM PDT by Taffini ( Mr. Pippen and Mr. Waffles do not approve and neither do I)
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To: Taffini
Sad to think that one drink a day would have prevented such a miserable end to their lives.

It's sad but please remember, this study-analysis only suggests a statistical reduction by 23%....having a drink everyday is no 'guarantee' of an Alzheimer's -free life by any means.

42 posted on 08/28/2011 1:38:16 AM PDT by Stoat (If you want a vision of the future, imagine a Birkenstock stamping on a human face... forever)
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To: Stoat

Thank you!


43 posted on 08/28/2011 8:54:58 AM PDT by Silentgypsy (If this creature is not stopped it could make its way to Novosibirsk!)
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To: Stoat; Taffini

I bet you might like those creamy concoctions made with creme de cacao, Kahlua, etc. I brought those to a party and everybody loved them. The only problem was that the servings were only supposed to be 2 or 3 ounces each, and people were drinking 8 to 12 ounce servings lol!
Maybe you can ask a bartender for a Pink Lady or a Pink Squirrel. Cheers!


44 posted on 08/28/2011 9:07:15 AM PDT by Silentgypsy (If this creature is not stopped it could make its way to Novosibirsk!)
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To: Stoat
Thank you

but it isn't the metric system that bothers me
45 posted on 08/28/2011 11:07:26 AM PDT by Steve Van Doorn (*in my best Eric Cartman voice* 'I love you, guys')
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To: Silentgypsy; Taffini
Thank you!

You're quite welcome, and thank you so much for your kind words and cocktail suggestions :-)

Here's a stylish adult beverage for you :-)

 

 

 

St Patrick's Day Martini 
2 jiggers of gin 
2 jiggers of crème de menthe 
2 splashes of mint bitters

Add gin, creme de menthe, and bitters into a martini shaker. Shake well. Strain into a chilled martini glass. 

 St Patrick's Day Martini Recipe

46 posted on 08/28/2011 9:58:56 PM PDT by Stoat (If you want a vision of the future, imagine a Birkenstock stamping on a human face... forever)
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To: Stoat

Thank you for the martini recipe. Is that how you see the glass after you’ve had the whole thing? Are “bitters” bitter?


47 posted on 08/29/2011 7:21:42 AM PDT by Silentgypsy (If this creature is not stopped it could make its way to Novosibirsk!)
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To: Silentgypsy

I’ve had a few pink squirrels years ago and I must say it is the one drink that didn’t taste like alcohol—they should serve it in malt shops...if there were any left...


48 posted on 08/29/2011 12:48:32 PM PDT by Taffini ( Mr. Pippen and Mr. Waffles do not approve and neither do I)
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