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Anybody in here know anything about venting gas stoves?
Vanity ^ | 10-9-2011 | Vanity

Posted on 10/09/2011 7:00:44 AM PDT by OKSooner

Almost a disaster in progress going on at my house. Bought a new gas stove to replace the electric one. It sits next to an interior wall, and to make a long story short...

The previous owner framed up a big sheetrock edifice thing to accomodate the microwave oven / vent hood over the electric stove. Getting a look at the underside of it with the microwave gone, I can see that the only way to vent it out thru the roof is to (maybe) run it out thru the same flue that services the gas water heater downstairs. There's one of those pie-plate looking covers on the flue inside the "edifice", facing towards the stove. That is, IF a human being can figure out a way to get their hands up in there and assemble and fit a flue.


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Anybody out there know what the codes usually require? How 'bout venting the stove back into the kitchen thru the vent in the microwave using the activated charcoal filter?

Any qualified input would be appreciated.

1 posted on 10/09/2011 7:00:48 AM PDT by OKSooner
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To: OKSooner
I'm sure someone will be along shortly, but I've been considering a similar conversion. I hadn't even thought of the vent.

Maybe you should call a plumber since they install gas stoves. Might be the best service call you ever bought.

2 posted on 10/09/2011 7:04:52 AM PDT by LouAvul
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To: OKSooner
Republican stoves are always fully vented.
Democrat stoves manufactured in Kenya are never vented.
3 posted on 10/09/2011 7:05:21 AM PDT by ClearCase_guy (The USSR spent itself into bankruptcy and collapsed -- and aren't we on the same path now?)
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To: OKSooner

Hire someone that knows what they are doing. I do most every DIY project at my house but I NEVER mess with anything related to gas.


4 posted on 10/09/2011 7:05:37 AM PDT by shelterguy
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To: OKSooner

Psst: buy a CO2 detector. Just sayin’, ya know.


5 posted on 10/09/2011 7:05:59 AM PDT by Lonesome in Massachussets (Ceterum autem censeo, Obama delenda est.)
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To: OKSooner

Certainly not an expert, but I didn’t think gas ranges require venting if they are used for cooking. What do the instructions say?


6 posted on 10/09/2011 7:05:59 AM PDT by Loyal Buckeye
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To: OKSooner

It would probably be quite a stretch to call me “qualified input”, but in my experience gas stoves are generally not vented.

Most houses leak enough air that there’s no need to vent.

Back when I did have a gas stove, in the winter I used to light a burner or two and just let them run for a few hours for 100% efficient heat (no losses up the chimney).


7 posted on 10/09/2011 7:06:11 AM PDT by DuncanWaring (The Lord uses the good ones; the bad ones use the Lord.)
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To: OKSooner
Needless to say you should have done some deeper research before your purchase. If you have propane or natural gas you need to call a licensed remodeler. Call the place where you purchased the check on their return policy.
You are facing a few dollars in remodeling cost.
8 posted on 10/09/2011 7:07:46 AM PDT by shadeaud ( “Pray for Obama. Psalm 109:8”. Just doing my duty a Christian)
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To: OKSooner

If gas stoves (LP in my case) need to be vented, my builder really screwed up.


9 posted on 10/09/2011 7:08:20 AM PDT by Tijeras_Slim
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To: OKSooner
I googled it. One response to that question: "I think the theory is if you pass out while cooking dinner, somebody will eventually get hungry and come find you. Hopefully, before you're dead."

Another (this one serious): No requirement under the IRC. FYI, ANSI Stds. allow up to 800ppm carbon monoxide from ranges. And you just thought it was the tryptophan in the turkey making you sleepy.

As previously stated, "when installed and operating properly"..... Tell me when you find that. These things have a horrible track record for CO production.

Failure to ventilate the kitchen can lead to what appears to be black soot all over the house. I'm gotten lab reports back that the black stuff is charred food particles stuck to soybean cooking oil. All because of no ventilation.

If they ventilate, then it should comply with ASHRAE 62.2 for MUA. Whoever sucks air out of a home is responsible for providing MUA to replace it. Otherwise, uncompensated exhaust fans can depressurize the home and backdraft atmospherically vented appliances. These fans don't always capture all the aerosolized byproducts of cooking but they are pretty good at backdrafting open fireplaces.

10 posted on 10/09/2011 7:09:21 AM PDT by LouAvul
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To: OKSooner

Natural gas ranges generally are not vented like a gas hot water heater or furnace that will have a “B” vent going up through the roof. Just don’t leave the burners on a long time like to heat the house. The vent above the range is for exhausting smoke. If the house is really small or really tight, crack a window open. Check with the manufacture of the gas range to be sure or call your local HVAC shop.


11 posted on 10/09/2011 7:09:50 AM PDT by Any Fate But Submission
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To: Lonesome in Massachussets
buy a CO2 detector.

You actually meant "Buy a carbon monoxide (CO) detector", right?

12 posted on 10/09/2011 7:10:04 AM PDT by DuncanWaring (The Lord uses the good ones; the bad ones use the Lord.)
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To: OKSooner

This reminds me of the parachutist whose chute would not open, and he sees this guy coming up at him and yells,”do you know anything about parachutes”? The guy coming up says “no, do you know anyhing about gas stoves”.


13 posted on 10/09/2011 7:11:24 AM PDT by chainsaw (I'd hate to be a democrat running against Sarah Palin.)
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To: LouAvul
I'm gotten lab reports back that the black stuff is charred food particles stuck to soybean cooking oil. All because of no ventilation.

I'm pretty sure you'd get "charred food particles stuck to soybean cooking oil" from electric stoves, too.

14 posted on 10/09/2011 7:13:44 AM PDT by DuncanWaring (The Lord uses the good ones; the bad ones use the Lord.)
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To: OKSooner
In my opinion, there is a high potential FIRE HAZARD.

In my opinion, you should get one or more professional inspector(s) to give you written advice on vent routing and installation and then follow that advice to the letter.

15 posted on 10/09/2011 7:13:44 AM PDT by pyx (Rule#1.The LEFT lies.Rule#2.See Rule#1. IF THE LEFT CONTROLS THE LANGUAGE, IT CONTROLS THE ARGUMENT.)
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To: OKSooner

No vent needed. BTW I’m a licensed electrician. Your electric stove didn’t have one either.


16 posted on 10/09/2011 7:14:37 AM PDT by Brasky
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To: OKSooner

I’d call the Gas Company myself...


17 posted on 10/09/2011 7:17:01 AM PDT by ErnBatavia (Obama Voters: Jose Baez wants YOU for his next jury pool.......)
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To: OKSooner

Replacing the 220v outlet for the old electric stove is your only issue.


18 posted on 10/09/2011 7:18:29 AM PDT by Brasky
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To: OKSooner

It doesn’t need vented. As another poster said, houses aren’t airtight enough to allow the stove to consume the oxygen in the house.

If you’re concerned, get a carbon monoxide detector. If the stove starts depleting the oxygen levels in the house, the stove will begin to burn inefficiently and create carbon monoxide and trip the alarm long before you reach a dangerous condition.

If you’re STILL concerned about it, just crack a window when you cook.

Just so you know, my mother and grandmother both used gas cooktops for many, many years with no ill effects.


19 posted on 10/09/2011 7:18:57 AM PDT by FLAMING DEATH (Are you better off than you were $4 trillion ago?)
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To: OKSooner
Get on the Internet and see what the manufacturer recommends. You can find building code on the net and you might get chapter and verse form the manufacturer. I have a hood and vent over my electric stove. Lots of stoves have a vent for moisture. Did they cover the vent with the microwave? How strict are your building codes? Some Pro Union states require licensed union members to install equipment. Others do not seem to care.
20 posted on 10/09/2011 7:19:00 AM PDT by mountainlion (I am voting for Sarah after getting screwed again by the DC Thugs.)
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To: Brasky
No vent needed.

I don't understand why you are saying a vent is not needed. When a cook fries food, are you saying that a vent is not needed ?

21 posted on 10/09/2011 7:20:46 AM PDT by pyx (Rule#1.The LEFT lies.Rule#2.See Rule#1. IF THE LEFT CONTROLS THE LANGUAGE, IT CONTROLS THE ARGUMENT.)
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To: OKSooner

I asked a gas company tech about this and he told me the newer gas ranges don’t need venting. I thought about it and concluded it has something to do with pilotless ignition.


22 posted on 10/09/2011 7:21:41 AM PDT by Havisham
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To: OKSooner
Unless I am mistaken, I think the poster is asking about a RANGE HOOD being vented to the outside for the gas stove ? The RANGE HOOD is ABOVE the cooking area.

The Poster might want to clarify, please.

23 posted on 10/09/2011 7:25:07 AM PDT by pyx (Rule#1.The LEFT lies.Rule#2.See Rule#1. IF THE LEFT CONTROLS THE LANGUAGE, IT CONTROLS THE ARGUMENT.)
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To: OKSooner

I’ve never seen a vented gas stove. Not sure why it would need a vent other than to remove cooking odors.


24 posted on 10/09/2011 7:26:44 AM PDT by Kirkwood (Zombie Hunter Hobbit)
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To: OKSooner

The hood is for venting cooking exhaust, smoke, odors, the like.


25 posted on 10/09/2011 7:28:12 AM PDT by Havisham
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To: OKSooner

The hood is for venting cooking exhaust, smoke, odors, the like.


26 posted on 10/09/2011 7:28:12 AM PDT by Havisham
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To: OKSooner

My fiancee’ a general contractor of 30 years is sitting here next to me and he says a charcoal filter will not take the carbon monoxide out.

He says you cannot vent two appliances through on vent in a closed areas as the place where you add the second appliance will leak.

You need a 4 or 6 inch vent going out through the roof that comes down and hooks onto the microwave fan vent. You have to take the blocker out and change the position of the motor and squirrel cage so that it will blow up instead of out the face of the microwave. A job for a licensed professional who will know the codes in your area.


27 posted on 10/09/2011 7:28:12 AM PDT by Georgia Girl 2 (The only purpose of a pistol is to fight your way back to the rifle you should never have dropped.)
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To: FLAMING DEATH
It doesn’t need vented.

It does't need to be vented either.

28 posted on 10/09/2011 7:30:57 AM PDT by O6ret (for)
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To: Havisham

I am a licensed plumber!
Do not vent anything into that water heater vent!
Gas ranges do not need a vent.
Sometime the range hood is vented through the roof to take odors and such to the exterior!
To, successfully tie two vents together you would need to increase the size to the proper diameter.
Plus vented gasses have to have heat to work so the range would never generate enough heat to vent anything out in conjunction w/ the WH vent!


29 posted on 10/09/2011 7:32:06 AM PDT by Conserev1
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To: OKSooner

Residential gas stoves require no venting for the byproducts of combustion.

The amount of CO generated, and the usage time, is too small to require it. Just don’t use it to heat your house.


30 posted on 10/09/2011 7:32:41 AM PDT by A.Hun (Common sense is no longer common.)
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To: pyx

There is no vent pipe. Like on a dryer. When cooking food the vent is either a vent hood. Or on a cabinet mounted microwave.


31 posted on 10/09/2011 7:33:25 AM PDT by Brasky
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To: LouAvul

If you have black soot in your kitchen, you need a cooking class.


32 posted on 10/09/2011 7:33:50 AM PDT by Kirkwood (Zombie Hunter Hobbit)
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To: OKSooner

I’ve had gas stoves all my life...both natural gas and propane. They are never “vented”. At the most, and this is just for convenience and not code, you might have a fan hood. But it’s not required.


33 posted on 10/09/2011 7:35:07 AM PDT by DouglasKC
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To: pyx

Apples/oranges,
there is venting the gas fumes(c-monox) and venting the cooking fumes........The range hood is for venting cooking smoke,steam whatever
I have a gas range and it is not vented like the hot water heater.....


34 posted on 10/09/2011 7:36:10 AM PDT by CGASMIA68
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To: Conserev1

However the GC above is correct the range hood w/ a fan and damper sys.
will take out cooking odors and heat. But is not a design intended to remove vent gasses from a gas appliance!


35 posted on 10/09/2011 7:36:35 AM PDT by Conserev1
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To: OKSooner

By “venting”, I presume you mean your range hood. If so, *do not* connect that to your chimney flue. That’s a no-no.

To be proper,the range hood must be vented to the outside, although some of them just vent to the attic, as long as it’s well ventialated. I don’t think that’s technically “kosher”, though.

If you mean venting in the sense of venting the byproducts of combustion, guess what? You don’t.

Believe it or not, they simply stay right in your house. Natural gas burns cleanly, and it is not required to vent the stove.

Kinda makes you wonder why the big deal with venting things like your water heater and gas fireplace. No? But that’s the way it is.

I guess the leg they have to stand on is that cooking is limited. You aren’t running all your burner all day long.

Anyway, I’ve had gas stoves all my life, and it’s never been a problem. And prior to this house, none of the ranges even had a hood.


36 posted on 10/09/2011 7:56:16 AM PDT by Pessimist
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To: OKSooner

37 posted on 10/09/2011 7:58:08 AM PDT by martin_fierro (< |:)~)
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To: LouAvul

“I’m gotten lab reports back that the black stuff is charred food particles stuck to soybean cooking oil.”

Which you’d get from an electric stove too.


38 posted on 10/09/2011 7:58:23 AM PDT by Pessimist
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To: OKSooner

Call your local city inspector and ask them how you should go about modifying the previous owners unpermitted construction and additions.


39 posted on 10/09/2011 7:59:11 AM PDT by gunsequalfreedom (Conservative is not a label of convenience. It is a guide to your actions.)
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To: LouAvul
If they ventilate, then it should comply with ASHRAE 62.2 for MUA. Whoever sucks air out of a home is responsible for providing MUA to replace it. Otherwise, uncompensated exhaust fans can depressurize the home and backdraft atmospherically vented appliances. These fans don't always capture all the aerosolized byproducts of cooking but they are pretty good at backdrafting open fireplaces.

You sounds like you are way too familiar with the building codes. That is a tough world you live in. Good answer though.

40 posted on 10/09/2011 8:02:32 AM PDT by gunsequalfreedom (Conservative is not a label of convenience. It is a guide to your actions.)
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To: OKSooner
http://co.grand.co.us/building/Links/ BuildingCodeAmendments.pdf

Section G2424.8 is amended to read as follows: G2424.8 Equipment not required to be vented. The following appliances shall not be required to be vented:

1. Ranges.

2. Built-in domestic cooking units listed and marked for optional venting.

3. Hot plates and laundry stoves.

4. Type 1 Clothes dryers (Type 1 clothes dryers shall be exhausted in accordance with the requirements of Section G2437).

5. Refrigerators.

6. Counter appliances.

___________________________________________________________________________________ Your unit may or may or may not require venting. I would consider it from both a CO as well as a cooking grease build-up on the wall standpoint.

Does your vent-a-hood discharge it's exhaust into your attic or does it recirculates the air and use an activated charcoal type filter? If the hood exhausts into the attic and you have vent panels on your soffets and eaves you're good to go. If it recirculates there is the issue of replacing the charcoal filter periodically.

Your stove's paperwork will probably recommend following all "applicable national & local codes" so it might take a little digging to find the preferred installation in your jurisdiction.

41 posted on 10/09/2011 8:04:20 AM PDT by Free in Texas (Member of the Bitter Clingers Association.)
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To: DuncanWaring; Lonesome in Massachussets
buy a CO2 detector.

Get an OCD detector, too.

you just can't pay enough attention to that stuff.

42 posted on 10/09/2011 8:05:40 AM PDT by martin_fierro (< |:)~)
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To: O6ret
It does't need to be vented either.

It does't?

43 posted on 10/09/2011 8:08:54 AM PDT by FLAMING DEATH (Are you better off than you were $4 trillion ago?)
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To: martin_fierro

{Kinda makes you wonder why the big deal with venting things like your water heater and gas fireplace. No? But that’s the way it is.}

Because of carbonmonoxide, that’s why!
I know two families that lost their lives because of an improperly vented water heater!
These appliances burn more quantities of nat gas or lp than a range.
A typical WH burns 45 cubic feet of gas an hour, a furnace will burn 100CF on the low end. In other words a 125,00 btu furnace burns 125CF where a range burner may be 5CF or less.
1000btu = 1 cubic ft.
Unless you are qualified do not tamper with venting systems.
It is also a goos idea to have your system checked once a year to make sure is is working properly!


44 posted on 10/09/2011 8:17:24 AM PDT by Conserev1
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To: gunsequalfreedom

That was a quote off an inspector’s forum. Obviously it wasn’t clear that it was a quote.


45 posted on 10/09/2011 8:21:02 AM PDT by LouAvul
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To: Loyal Buckeye

I have a gas stove and the house had one when I moved in (which I replaced with my current stove). IT IS NOT VENTED.

That being said, my house was built in 1910 and building codes, even if the DID exist in 1910, have changed over the years.

How do you even vent a gas stove? As far as I know, you can’t. The oven vents to the outside (i.e the kithen) just above the cooktop, where the hot gasses can become a convenient plastic container melter. And the cooktop burners can’t be vented - practically speaking - because the flame is under a bunch of pots with food in them.

Are you talking about the vent hood? With the light and fan that can be manually switched on and off? These come in two styles. One style vents to the outside and the second style just blows the cooking odors and moisture back out into the room after running them though a charcoal and aluminum mesh filter. A grease trap and not much more.

I don’t believe the second style is up to modern codes (i.e. code now requires that it be vented outsided), but often older houses are grandfathered in based on the fact that they are old.


46 posted on 10/09/2011 8:23:27 AM PDT by WayneM (Two things are infinite: the universe and human stupidity; and I'm not sure about the the universe.)
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To: LouAvul

***Failure to ventilate the kitchen can lead to what appears to be black soot all over the house.****

Better check your air to gas adjustments. The flame should be BLUE, not yellow.

I have never had a problem with soot from my natural gas cook stove. My mom did have trouble with her heating stove years ago when squirrls plugged up her chiminey, but she was trying to use a propane stove on nat gas with a very yellow flame. When she cleaned out the chiminey and replaced her heating stove with a nat gas one she never had another problem.


47 posted on 10/09/2011 8:25:32 AM PDT by Ruy Dias de Bivar (Click my name. See my home page, if you dare! NEW PHOTOS & PAINTINGS)
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To: Pessimist

Not only that, some of the range hoods simply filter out the smoke and vent the exhaust directly back into the room.

http://www.dream-kitchen-ideas.com/ductless-range-hoods.html


48 posted on 10/09/2011 8:27:36 AM PDT by FLAMING DEATH (Are you better off than you were $4 trillion ago?)
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To: WayneM

Also - I have a CO detector with digital readout. Much to my surprise, my gas stove, even when the oven and multiple burners going, has never causes any elevated CO2 readings.

Go figure.


49 posted on 10/09/2011 8:27:45 AM PDT by WayneM (Two things are infinite: the universe and human stupidity; and I'm not sure about the the universe.)
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To: martin_fierro

That picture is a sure cure for attention deficit disorder. I could stare at those eyes all day.


50 posted on 10/09/2011 8:29:57 AM PDT by RichInOC (Sarah Palin is at war with the left. Most Freepers are just playing the video game.)
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