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Chuck Yeager Broke Sound Barrier 60 Years Ago - VOA Story
YouTube ^ | Oct 15, 2007 | My Earbot

Posted on 10/15/2011 8:47:55 AM PDT by Daffynition

American test pilot Chuck Yeager flew a plane through the sound barrier on October 14th, 1947. Some say only the Wright brothers — Orville and Wilbur — can claim a more significant achievement in the history of flight. At the time, Britain and Germany also were trying to develop a plane that could break the sound barrier, but the United States soon won out with its X-1. It was more rocket than plane, developed specifically to fly through the shock waves of the sound barrier, with Yeager as pilot. “About half of the engineers gave us no chance at all of ever successfully flying beyond the speed of sound. They said it’s a so-called barrier and the airplane would go out of control or disintegrate, but I didn’t look at it that way.” Yeager said he had confidence in the craft. He named it “Glamorous Glennis” for his wife, and described its bullet-shaped body as cozy. ....

(Excerpt) Read more at youtube.com ...


TOPICS: History; Military/Veterans
KEYWORDS:

1 posted on 10/15/2011 8:47:56 AM PDT by Daffynition
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To: Daffynition

Makes me want to go watch the first half of “The Right Stuff”...again...for the umteenth time!

Atta boy, Chuck!


2 posted on 10/15/2011 8:50:44 AM PDT by ozark hilljilly
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To: Daffynition

Ya got some Beeman’s?


3 posted on 10/15/2011 8:51:14 AM PDT by Wallop the Cat
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To: ozark hilljilly

4 posted on 10/15/2011 8:53:21 AM PDT by Daffynition (“There are no compacts between lions and men, and wolves and lambs have no concord.” ~ Homer)
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To: Daffynition

Handsome guy.


5 posted on 10/15/2011 8:54:35 AM PDT by trisham (Zen is not easy. It takes effort to attain nothingness. And then what do you have? Bupkis.)
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To: Wallop the Cat
-> CLICK
6 posted on 10/15/2011 8:58:21 AM PDT by Daffynition (“There are no compacts between lions and men, and wolves and lambs have no concord.” ~ Homer)
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To: Daffynition

Yeager was portrayed in The Right Stuff by Sam Shepard. To me it was a great performance and a fantastic movie.

7 posted on 10/15/2011 8:58:57 AM PDT by isthisnickcool (Sharia? No thanks.)
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To: Wallop the Cat

LOL

“Yep.”

“Well, can ya loan me a stick?”

I love that movie.
My, he’s still handsome pup. Back when men weren’t afraid to be men.


8 posted on 10/15/2011 8:59:29 AM PDT by ozark hilljilly
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To: Daffynition

He broke the sound barrier with a broken arm. He had to use a cut down broomstick handle to lock the hatch.


9 posted on 10/15/2011 9:00:00 AM PDT by Yo-Yo (Is the /sarc tag really necessary?)
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To: Daffynition

60 yrs ago or 64 years ago /


10 posted on 10/15/2011 9:00:00 AM PDT by Renegade
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To: trisham

It’s the *twinkle* in the eye that gets ya. ;)


11 posted on 10/15/2011 9:00:24 AM PDT by Daffynition (“There are no compacts between lions and men, and wolves and lambs have no concord.” ~ Homer)
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To: Renegade
LOL .... I was hoping no one would notice [:0] I just thought we shouldn't let the day go by without marking it in some way.

Chuck Yeager broke the sound barrier on October 14, 1947 in the X-1.


12 posted on 10/15/2011 9:06:34 AM PDT by Daffynition (“There are no compacts between lions and men, and wolves and lambs have no concord.” ~ Homer)
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To: Daffynition
Some say only the Wright brothers — Orville and Wilbur — can claim a more significant achievement in the history of flight.

No, big difference. Chuck Yeager piloted the first supersonic flight. A lot of engineers developed the aircraft that was capable of making the first supersonic flight. It was a huge team effort of which Yeager was the visible icon. But it could have been anyone else, including the Bell test pilot who went on strike for more money and didn't get to make the first flight.

The Wright Brothers did it all - research, developmenmt, test flights, manufacturing and design, pilot training, and then finally they flew it themselves. In 1903 there were only two pilots in the entire world. And only two airplane designers. All named Wright.

13 posted on 10/15/2011 9:16:00 AM PDT by oldbill
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To: Daffynition

TRS


14 posted on 10/15/2011 9:23:29 AM PDT by NonValueAdded (So much stress was put on Bush's Fault that it finally let go, magnitude 6)
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To: Daffynition

15 posted on 10/15/2011 9:38:18 AM PDT by NonValueAdded (So much stress was put on Bush's Fault that it finally let go, magnitude 6)
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To: Daffynition

Awesomeness. First officially recorded breaking of the sound barrier in level flight, although others claim, and it is plausible, that they did so briefly in other aircraft while in a powered dive, before Yeager did the level flight one in the X1.


16 posted on 10/15/2011 9:43:28 AM PDT by Paradox (The rich SHOULD be paying more taxes, and they WOULD, if they could make more money.)
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To: oldbill

http://texaslesstraveled.com/brodbeck.htm
Jacob Brodbeck


17 posted on 10/15/2011 9:43:49 AM PDT by Deaf Smith
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To: oldbill

http://www.tshaonline.org/handbook/online/articles/epa02


18 posted on 10/15/2011 9:45:55 AM PDT by Deaf Smith
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To: oldbill
Not a shabby legacy for a couple of kite fliers. :)


19 posted on 10/15/2011 9:59:04 AM PDT by Daffynition (“There are no compacts between lions and men, and wolves and lambs have no concord.” ~ Homer)
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To: oldbill
In 1903 there were only two pilots in the entire world. And only two airplane designers. All named Wright.

That's not exactly true... there were other people working on it. In fact, an unmanned, steam-powered heavier-than-air craft designed by John Stringfellow had got off the ground as early as 1848. Victor Tatin in France used a compressed-air engine to get his flying machine off the ground in 1874. A guy named Langley was working on a similar project at the very same time as the Wrights.

Even Hiram Maxim (of machine gun fame) built a steam-powered manned aircraft that had picked itself up and flew in 1894: "The American inventor of the machine gun built a very large 3.5 ton flying machine that ran on a track and was propelled by powerful twin naphtha fuelled steam engines. He made several tests in the huge biplane that were well recorded and reported. On July 31, 1894 he made a record breaking speed run at 42 miles per hour (68 km/h). The machine lifted from the 1,800-foot (550 m) track and broke a restraining rail, crashing after a short uncontrolled flight just above the ground."

Which, actually, is to take nothing away from the Wright Brothers. They did something that nobody else up until that time had done, which was to research, design, and build a practical heavier-than-air craft that could be flown in a controlled manner and safely landed. Unlike other inventors of their time and earlier, they didn't focus on power plants or just the macro-scale features of the structure; they did their homework on airfoil design and control surfaces. It was ground-breaking work, and it paid off.

So in a manner of speaking, they didn't really invent the airplane... they just made it practical.

20 posted on 10/15/2011 10:02:18 AM PDT by Oberon (Big Brutha Be Watchin'.)
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To: NonValueAdded

The only place I know where you can still buy it.....Weston, VT.

http://www.vermontcountrystore.com/store/jump/productDetail/Food_&_Candy/Candy_&_Chocolate/Nostalgic_Treats/Old-Time_Gums_%28Box_of_Twenty_5-Stick_Packs%29/54938


21 posted on 10/15/2011 10:05:19 AM PDT by Daffynition (“There are no compacts between lions and men, and wolves and lambs have no concord.” ~ Homer)
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To: Daffynition; KevinDavis; brytlea; cripplecreek; decimon; bigheadfred; KoRn; Grammy; married21; ...

Thanks Daffynition, and a happy belated anniversary of the event goes out to General Yeager. I heartily recommend his autobiography, and not least for its “other voices” chapters, which were contributed by other people.

An “extra, extra” ping to the APoD members.


22 posted on 10/15/2011 10:10:15 AM PDT by SunkenCiv (It's never a bad time to FReep this link -- https://secure.freerepublic.com/donate/)
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To: ozark hilljilly

Yep....great movie. Yeager is a hero to my grown son. Read about Yeager while in grade school and made Yeager his hero.


23 posted on 10/15/2011 10:11:20 AM PDT by Conservative4Ever (Man the pitchforks and torches....let the revolution begin)
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To: Daffynition

One of my childhood heroes!


24 posted on 10/15/2011 10:16:06 AM PDT by left that other site (Psalm 122:6)
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To: Daffynition

My sister was part of Public Relations at Edwards back when he visited the place in later years. She handled all kinds of requests, including requests for his autographed picture. He was long gone when the requests came in, so she signed his name and sent them off.

Days later she realized she had spelled his last name “Yaeger”. Nobody ever complained.


25 posted on 10/15/2011 10:16:11 AM PDT by Oatka ("A society of sheep must in time beget a government of wolves." –Bertrand de Jouvenel)
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Click

26 posted on 10/15/2011 10:20:26 AM PDT by RedMDer (Forward With Confidence!)
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To: Oberon
Unlike other inventors of their time and earlier, they didn't focus on power plants or just the macro-scale features of the structure; they did their homework on airfoil design and control surfaces. It was ground-breaking work, and it paid off.

They even used a wind tunnel. The think the key word for Wrights is they had the first controlled flight.

27 posted on 10/15/2011 10:40:50 AM PDT by Moonman62 (The US has become a government with a country, rather than a country with a government.)
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To: Daffynition

actually, click the image in my post above and you can order it online.


28 posted on 10/15/2011 10:42:07 AM PDT by NonValueAdded (So much stress was put on Bush's Fault that it finally let go, magnitude 6)
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To: oldbill
In 1903 there were only two pilots in the entire world. And only two airplane designers. All named Wright.

Actually there were several other pilots(or would be pilots)but only the wright bros got off the ground:). Yep, I would say there's was a far greater achievement than Chuck's. Although Chuck was a great pilot, he would never have broken the sound barrier had it not been for Orville an Wilbur. A pilot I think came closest to their achievement was Charles Lindbergh, he helped build his plane and played a large part in the design of it, not to mention flying across the Atlantic with only a compass and dead reckoning to guide him. Still, without the pioneer work of the Wright Bros, he would never have known how to design a plane let alone fly one.

29 posted on 10/15/2011 10:52:46 AM PDT by calex59
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To: calex59

Did the Wright brothers utilize any of the aerodynamic discoveries of Otto Lilienthal, the German glider designer and pilot?


30 posted on 10/15/2011 11:11:11 AM PDT by elcid1970 ("Deport all Muslims. Nuke Mecca now. Death to Islam means freedom for all mankind.")
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To: Yo-Yo
He broke the sound barrier with a broken arm. He had to use a cut down broomstick handle to lock the hatch.

It wasn't his arm. He'd cracked his ribs in a horse riding accident, and when sitting in the X-1's cockpit wasn't able to reach across to activate the locking mechanism.
31 posted on 10/15/2011 11:16:38 AM PDT by tanknetter
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To: SunkenCiv

I really appreciate your ping to this “blast” from the past!

(Someone said that already, surely.)


32 posted on 10/15/2011 11:18:02 AM PDT by .30Carbine
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To: NonValueAdded

We associate the Swiss with high-quality goods and if you haven’t had the chance, view the video of Rossy’S flight over the GC....exquisitely done.

http://www.freerepublic.com/focus/f-chat/2792867/posts


33 posted on 10/15/2011 11:21:05 AM PDT by Daffynition (“There are no compacts between lions and men, and wolves and lambs have no concord.” ~ Homer)
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To: Oatka
Great story! Thanks Oatka.

If we ever see a Chuck Yeager autograph appear on the pawn-show, and they discover it is spelled wrong...we'll know why! LOL


34 posted on 10/15/2011 11:26:17 AM PDT by Daffynition (“There are no compacts between lions and men, and wolves and lambs have no concord.” ~ Homer)
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To: oldbill
Chuck Yeager piloted the first supersonic flight. A lot of engineers developed the aircraft that was capable of making the first supersonic flight. It was a huge team effort of which Yeager was the visible icon. But it could have been anyone else, including the Bell test pilot who went on strike for more money and didn't get to make the first flight.

There's quite a bit of mythology built up around the X-1 program, and the portrayal in "The Right Stuff" of Yeager just being an available pilot when Slick Goodlin took his walk definitely qualifies as such.

Yeager, for all his faults (and he had/has many) was much much more than the "visible icon" of the program and the first guy who happened to make it through the sound barrier. He was an integral part of the engineering and test team, and his experience and skills contributed enormously across the whole range of the program's success. Not the least of which included the discovery that the use of the horizontal stabilizer's trim capability (which allowed the entire stab to be moved up and down about 5 degrees in either direction) would compensate for the problematic shockwave condition responsible for locking the controls. This not only allowed the flight through the sound barrier, it also led to the development of the "flying tail" configuration which has provided significant (an understatement) benefits ever since.
35 posted on 10/15/2011 11:27:31 AM PDT by tanknetter
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To: elcid1970
“[Lilienthal] was without question the greatest of the precursors, and the world owes to him a great debt." Wilbur Wright September 1912

Otto Lilienthal,1848–1896 The most influential glider pioneer was Otto Lilienthal, a German engineer who began his aeronautical research in 1871 by studying bird flight. After nearly two decades of imaginative experimentation and research, he produced the best and most complete body of aerodynamic data up to that time. He published his results in Der Vogelflug als Grundlage der Fliegekunst (Birdflight as the Basis of Aviation) in 1889.

Lilienthal gliders
Following his program of data collection, Lilienthal constructed and tested a series of elegant, full-size gliders. Between 1891 and 1896 he made nearly 2,000 brief flights in 16 different glider designs based on his aerodynamic research.

An abrupt and tragic end
On August 9, 1896, while flying one of his monoplane gliders, Lilienthal stalled and crashed. He died from his injuries the following day. The Wright brothers later cited his death as the point when their serious interest in flight research began.

36 posted on 10/15/2011 11:29:50 AM PDT by Daffynition (“There are no compacts between lions and men, and wolves and lambs have no concord.” ~ Homer)
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To: elcid1970
You knew the answer to your question, already, didn't you?

The drawbacks of Lilienthal's method of control Otto Lilienthal controlled his glider by shifting his body weight from side to side, which altered the craft’s center of gravity and caused it to turn. The Wrights recognized that this technique severely limited the size of the aircraft, because the pilot and craft had to be similar in weight for body shifting to be effective. They reasoned that if they could control balance aerodynamically—using the forces air exerts on a wing—they could build an aircraft of any size and weight.


37 posted on 10/15/2011 11:32:50 AM PDT by Daffynition (“There are no compacts between lions and men, and wolves and lambs have no concord.” ~ Homer)
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To: ozark hilljilly

It’s been on cable the past couple of weeks and I’ve seen it three times now. What a great, quiet movie.


38 posted on 10/15/2011 11:33:08 AM PDT by rabidralph
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To: Renegade

Easy for me, day after I was born!


39 posted on 10/15/2011 11:42:49 AM PDT by doorgunner69
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To: tanknetter

You are correct, sir. Ribs it was. I don’t know why my fingers types “arm.”


40 posted on 10/15/2011 11:59:46 AM PDT by Yo-Yo (Is the /sarc tag really necessary?)
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To: elcid1970
Did the Wright brothers utilize any of the aerodynamic discoveries of Otto Lilienthal, the German glider designer and pilot?

They started out using them but found out they were flawed. The Wright brothers built their own(and the absolute first ever)wind tunnel in order to get the correct math for the wing. Until they built the wind tunnel they relied on faulty math from Lilienthal and others and their machines had poor lifting ability. After the wind tunnel they wre able to make a better wing and get their powered machine off the ground. The wrights were truly pioneers in the aviation field and others, such as Curtis, soon built on their work. They were also the first to use ailerons in the form of wing warping in order to turn correctly in the air. Other early pilots and builders used only rudders, but after seeing a Wright flyer in action they soon Made their own versions, violating the Wrights patents(Curtis was among them)which they spent years in court trying to get justice for.

41 posted on 10/15/2011 1:57:15 PM PDT by calex59
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To: calex59

I will always remember Yeager’s response when, at the time, he was asked for a comment about the Challenger Shuttle disaster. He responded by saying something like “Well, all I can tell you is that people get killed in the flying business.” He has probably seen lots of people come and lots of people go in the flying business.


42 posted on 10/15/2011 2:16:16 PM PDT by Eleven Bravo 6 319thID
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To: calex59
On the wings of giants

Wonder if fate had brought c15Century da Vinci with the 19thcentury Wrights....what they would have come up with?

FROM LEONARDO'S "TREATISE UPON THE FLIGHT OF BIRDS"

43 posted on 10/15/2011 2:53:54 PM PDT by Daffynition (“There are no compacts between lions and men, and wolves and lambs have no concord.” ~ Homer)
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To: Oatka
Well, that was a bit closer to the German original.

≤}B^)

44 posted on 10/15/2011 7:15:46 PM PDT by Erasmus (I love "The Raven," but then what do I know? I'm just a poetaster.)
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To: elcid1970
Did the Wright brothers utilize any of the aerodynamic discoveries of Otto Lilienthal, the German glider designer and pilot?

Yes, in a sort of way. The assessed the literature on airfoils, including Lilienthal's tables of lift vs. drag for a few wing shapes.

Being cautious, the Wrights tried to replicate the findings in their own wind tunnel and found them completely at variance with the published tables. They went with their own data.

45 posted on 10/15/2011 7:19:09 PM PDT by Erasmus (I love "The Raven," but then what do I know? I'm just a poetaster.)
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To: doorgunner69

I remember it well. I was 7 mo. old.


46 posted on 10/16/2011 10:45:21 AM PDT by Renegade
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