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FR Weekly Cooking Thread *Recipes* Oct 22, 2011
FreeRepublic Cooks | Oct 22, 2011 | libertarian27

Posted on 10/22/2011 9:51:25 AM PDT by libertarian27

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To: logitech

Add the powered spices while frying the meat/onions/garlic. The hot oil “blooms” their flavors.


51 posted on 10/22/2011 2:37:54 PM PDT by Scarpetta (e pluribus victim)
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To: Bizzy Bugz

I wish I wasn’t diabetic... Ha!


52 posted on 10/22/2011 2:40:24 PM PDT by hattend (If I wanted you dead, you'd be dead. - Cameron Connor)
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To: bgill

I fermented my first batch of sauerkraut this year. Have about 4 quarts left. As a matter of fact, having pork roast and kraut tonight for dinner.


53 posted on 10/22/2011 2:40:53 PM PDT by Scarpetta (e pluribus victim)
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To: bgill; hattend

Stop the search! - I got it:

Cake __ Week 07/30/11 __ Post # 54 __  Chocolate sauerkraut cake

http://www.freerepublic.com/focus/chat/2756241/posts?page=54#54


54 posted on 10/22/2011 2:41:49 PM PDT by libertarian27 (Agenda21: Dept. of Life, Dept. of Liberty and the Dept. of Happiness)
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To: libertarian27; All

At various times since this weekly thread first began we have talked about how package sizes keep getting smaller. Does anyone know if packaged cake mixes have gotten smaller in the last year or two?

I always used to get 24 cupcakes out of every cake mix I made up, now I am getting only 15-18 and the larger number is only when I have added additional ingredients such as mashed bananas or something else to the actual cake batter before baking.

I am still using the same ice cream scoop I have used for years for the cupcakes, so I know I am not filling the cups any fuller. The mix still says it is supposed to make 24 cupcakes, but they would be really tiny cupcakes if I tried to stretch it to 24 cupcakes.

The last couple of layer cakes we have made with packaged cake mixes also seemed to have thinner layers. All the mixes I have in my cupboard say they are 18.25 ounces. I am guessing that they used to be about 24 oz and that they too are smaller now.


55 posted on 10/22/2011 2:44:18 PM PDT by Flamenco Lady
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To: libertarian27

Thanks!


56 posted on 10/22/2011 2:45:10 PM PDT by hattend (If I wanted you dead, you'd be dead. - Cameron Connor)
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To: Flamenco Lady

The mix manufacturers are trying to meet a price point so they have been cutting back on size. Candy makers have been doing it for years.

Sooner or later, the prices will have to take off, they can’t keep skimping in the boxes.


57 posted on 10/22/2011 2:50:34 PM PDT by hattend (If I wanted you dead, you'd be dead. - Cameron Connor)
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To: Mrs. Don-o

Garam Masala

That’s an interest spice mix. Several years ago I purchased a Middle Eastern 7 spice mix. As it was prepared in the store, the ingredients were not listed. By the aroma, I would say they are very similar.
I used to have an iron stomach for hot that would take the skin off your innards, not any more. Funny how things work, not! But, we are very fond of Indian, and Middle Eastern food.
If you are ever in Phoenix/Mesa, don’t miss Hadji Baba’s...mmm mmmm mmmmmm!
Way off subject, but have you ever roasted green pepper corns for Chinese food? Heavenly! Just a thot..dry roasting.


58 posted on 10/22/2011 3:11:55 PM PDT by WestwardHo
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To: Library Lady

Is this it, LL?

http://recipes.sparkpeople.com/recipe-detail.asp?recipe=432107


59 posted on 10/22/2011 3:24:17 PM PDT by Mountain Mary (Capitalism is the right of the individual to pursue happiness and keep the fruits of their labor.)
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To: libertarian27
that’s my excuse

Good excuse. My suggestion is chicken soup. It cures most anything.

60 posted on 10/22/2011 3:27:58 PM PDT by Texas Fossil (Government, even in its best state is but a necessary evil; in its worst state an intolerable one)
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To: WestwardHo
I never even heard of green peppercorns. But of course, there are a vast number of things I have never heard of.

I haven't done Chinese in a long time. I'd like to try Moo Shu Pork (or however you spell it.)

61 posted on 10/22/2011 3:29:55 PM PDT by Mrs. Don-o ("God bless the child who's got his own." Arthur Herzog Jr./Billie Holiday)
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To: Scarpetta

I do add some spices while cooking the meat. It’s hard to describe all the nuances. It is a good base recipe. Add to it as you like. We’ve entered it in some cook offs. Never won but everybody likes it. Thanks.


62 posted on 10/22/2011 3:33:01 PM PDT by logitech
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To: Mr. Mojo

Pretty simple, easy, full of great ingredients, Sounds like a winner to me!

Thank You Mr. Mojo!


63 posted on 10/22/2011 3:54:13 PM PDT by Randy Larsen
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To: Mrs. Don-o

We do an Asian style stir fry about once a week at my house now because they are a great way to use up any leftover poultry, beef or pork and any vegetables that need to be eaten up. I always have cabbage, carrots, celery and mushrooms in the house that can be added to the stir fry as well to round out the dish.

We found a Korean BBQ Sauce that we really like a lot at a local Asian Market, so I usually use that instead of making my own stir fry sauce or using a prepared stir fry sauce.

I serve the stir fry with white rice and for dessert we usually have sliced oranges for good luck, just like they serve at many Chinese Restaurants.

Leftover stir fry is great added to ramen noodles for a healty lunch or a light dinner the next day too! Both are budget friendly as well.


64 posted on 10/22/2011 3:59:33 PM PDT by Flamenco Lady
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To: Mountain Mary

I believe it is except it had almonds instead of walnuts. I did a search and came up with one that was similar. I had it in my mind that there might have been grapes in there, but I can’t remember. Thanks for your help.


65 posted on 10/22/2011 4:22:15 PM PDT by Library Lady
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To: Scarpetta

We are in the process of making kraut, too. We have between six and seven gallons in crocks waiting. . . waiting. . . waiting. No, we are not going to eat it all by ourselves. Half goes to the guy that gave us the cabbage. We’re making it for others, too.
]
Do you add anything except cabbage and salt. We put in a little shredded carrots and some caraway seeds. A friend told us how to do that a couple of years ago, and we really like it that way.


66 posted on 10/22/2011 4:27:10 PM PDT by Library Lady
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To: Library Lady; Scarpetta; All

I have never made home made Kraut. Could you ladies explain to all of us how you do it?


67 posted on 10/22/2011 4:50:20 PM PDT by Flamenco Lady
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To: Flamenco Lady

3 heads cabbage, chopped
3-4 tbsp. pickling salt
1 carrot, slivered
Caraway seeds

Mash cabbage with mall, not too hard. Layer in crock with salt, carrots and caraway seeds. Cover with plastic wrap. Put a plate on top and push down until water covers the top of the cabbage. Add a brick or rock to hold plate down. Put in cool dark place for at least 2 weeks. Can.

[Make kraut when the moon is growing old, and signs should be in the arms or the upper torso, in the head is the best. Never can kraut when the signs are in the bowels, feet, heart, secrets, or the rains.]


68 posted on 10/22/2011 5:30:24 PM PDT by Library Lady
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To: Library Lady

Wow, that sounds pretty easy. I know my grandmother used to make her own kraut, but I don’t remember ever watching her actually make it. I don’t know why I never tried to do it myself before. I have a lot of German ancestry, so sauerkraut is something I have eaten and loved all my life and it should have been something I learned how to do growing up. I guess my mom never made it because my grandmother always gave us some of hers, so I never learned how to make it myself. I do remember her homemade kraut tasted far better than the stuff you buy in the grocery store, but I guess I always assumed it was something that was really complicated to make.

I love the quote you included in your post. I can just imagine that being said in some old cookbook! I remember as a child my German great grandfather got his hair cuts when the moon was at a certain phase, but I don’t remember exactly why or exactly what the phase of the moon was when he got his hair cut.

We are getting ready to start moving to a new residence in the middle of November just before Thanksgiving, so I will probably wait until after the move to make it. I know I have an old crock somewhere in one of the storage rooms here, so I will make sure to remember where it gets packed so I can get a batch started after the move. We can buy cabbage pretty much year round here, so I should be able to make it any time I want some as long as the moon is growing old! LOL!


69 posted on 10/22/2011 7:05:17 PM PDT by Flamenco Lady
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To: Mrs. Don-o

Oh, my!!!!! That’s some good eats!!!! Made the beet cake tonight and am taking the first bites.... yummmmm! It’s still just a bit warm. Didn’t find any milk so used water and a sprinkle of cinnamon and topped it with a cream cheese frosting. Very moist. Hubby turned his nose up at the idea of beets but he’s in there stuffing his face with a huge piece, lol. Thanks!


70 posted on 10/22/2011 7:35:21 PM PDT by bgill (There, happy now?)
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To: bgill
Hubby turned his nose up at the idea of beets but he’s in there stuffing his face with a huge piece, lol.

HA! Great visual-writing....I can see a man devouring beet cake and looking at it - shaking his head - taking the next bite - repeat.....

You'll probably have to make another cake by Monday - lol

71 posted on 10/22/2011 8:42:29 PM PDT by libertarian27 (Agenda21: Dept. of Life, Dept. of Liberty and the Dept. of Happiness)
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To: Flamenco Lady

A friend of ours uses garbage bags and water to seal his kraut. He puts one bag inside of the other. The first bag is put in the crock and pressed against the kraut and draped over the sides to seal out the air. He puts water in the second bag, ties it with a twist-tie, and places it in the crock over the first bag. He makes sure the water fills any air gaps. The weight of the water helps, too. I guess the purpose of using two bags is in case the water leaks.

My husband bought me a fermentation jar that I just love. It has a ridge around the top that the lid fits in. After you put the lid on, just fill the ridge with water to seal out the air. You can see gas bubbles escape as it ferments.

Good luck with your kraut!


72 posted on 10/23/2011 3:37:15 AM PDT by Library Lady
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To: Library Lady

I should have said groove instead of ridge. Duh.


73 posted on 10/23/2011 5:45:16 AM PDT by Library Lady
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To: momtothree

I will try this. Thanks for posting the recipe.


74 posted on 10/23/2011 6:21:48 AM PDT by kalee (The offenses we give, we write in the dust; Those we take, we engrave in marble. J Huett 1658)
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To: libertarian27
I came up with this one a while back. I love it because it's adaptable

You can use chicken, beef, or no meat at all

Anyway, You can use hot or mild chilies & sauce....and use pepper jack cheese if you like an added 'kick'.

I'm not normally one for using recipes that call for canned foods, but I make an exception for this one...it's that good, IMHO.

Y'all try it & let me know what you think.

------

GREEN CHILIE CASSAROLE

1 lb ground beef OR boneless chicken [cubed]
1 can green enchilada sauce
2 large cans diced green chilies OR 10 to 12 green chilies, roasted and cleaned
12 corn tortias
1 can whole kernel corn [drained]
1 Tablespoon oil
3 tablespoons diced onion
2 tsp salt
2 tsp pepper
1 minced garlic
2 Tblsp ground cumin
About 3 cups shredded cheese
3 eggs
2 Tblsp flour

-----

Preheat oven to 350 degrees
Brown ground beef [or] prepare chicken
In a 10 inch skillet, sauté onion and garlic in the oil
Add enchilada sauce, meat, drained corn and green chili
[ONLY if using canned – fresh chilies are layered with tortias]

Heat till bubbly
Spray casserole or 9 x 13 pan with cooking spray
Starting with the sauce - spread a thin layer in the bottom of the dish
Add strips of fresh chilies [if using]
Sprinkle with 1/4 to 1/3 of the cheese
Cover with a single layer of corn tortia [they trim to fit nicely, but don't worry about small gaps]

Repeat layers.

Mix eggs with flour until smooth. Pour over top
Bake 30 to 40 minutes
Let sit about 10 minutes before serving

75 posted on 10/23/2011 6:32:20 AM PDT by MamaTexan (I am ~Person~ as created by the Law of Nature, not a 'person' as created by the laws of Man)
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To: MamaTexan
ROFLMAO!

I just knew I was going to mess that post up.

The salt, pepper & cumin get put in the sauce, BTW !

76 posted on 10/23/2011 6:36:58 AM PDT by MamaTexan (I am ~Person~ as created by the Law of Nature, not a 'person' as created by the laws of Man)
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To: Library Lady

I used just cabbage and kosher salt + i added some boiled cooled water - just enough to cover the top. I’m using a crock specifically made for fermenting. I want to make kimchi next.


77 posted on 10/23/2011 7:59:25 AM PDT by Scarpetta (e pluribus victim)
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To: Scarpetta

I had an older friend who just packed her cabbage into quart jars, added a tsp. of salt, and poured boiling water over it. She put lids on it and stored it for weeks before using it. It seems easier than what I do, but we like it fermented in crocks best.

How do you make kimchi? Do you add chili peppers? Is it hot?


78 posted on 10/23/2011 8:16:30 AM PDT by Library Lady
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To: Library Lady

Well, you could vary it according to what you remember you liked about it! I’ve found that toasting almonds(or other nuts first) adds alot of flavor.


79 posted on 10/23/2011 8:57:25 AM PDT by Mountain Mary (Capitalism is the right of the individual to pursue happiness and keep the fruits of their labor.)
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To: Scarpetta; Tamar1973
I want to make kimchi next.

Ping to our Korean Food Expert at Free Republic!

80 posted on 10/23/2011 9:09:32 AM PDT by libertarian27 (Agenda21: Dept. of Life, Dept. of Liberty and the Dept. of Happiness)
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To: rockinqsranch

When fixing rice as a cereal throw in a hand full of craisons or dried blue berries or black berries, chop an apple, banana chips, fresh blue berries, candied pineapple, the list is nearly endless, then add butter and brown sugar and a dash of cinnamon.


81 posted on 10/23/2011 10:44:06 AM PDT by W. W. SMITH (Obama is an instrument of enslavement)
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To: Flamenco Lady

I have the same problem with the wife, I no longer tell her about some things I put in what I’m cooking. She refuses to eat kale but has been eating it as salad and spinach for months and loves that new variety of lettuce and spinach I found. LOL


82 posted on 10/23/2011 10:57:55 AM PDT by W. W. SMITH (Obama is an instrument of enslavement)
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To: W. W. SMITH

One cup rice, two cups water Leave out the butter and brown sugar add a chicken bouillon cube, curry and cumin to taste, only half as much of the sweet ingredients from above. onion, garlic, what ever you like. Use as a foundation for chili, beef stew, stir fry, or a thick soup. I like dishes spicy hot so they end up doctored quit a bit.


83 posted on 10/23/2011 11:19:46 AM PDT by W. W. SMITH (Obama is an instrument of enslavement)
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To: W. W. SMITH

I have been avoiding these threads for a long time. Finally broke down, now I have to go cook!


84 posted on 10/23/2011 11:22:00 AM PDT by W. W. SMITH (Obama is an instrument of enslavement)
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To: W. W. SMITH; All

LOL! I may have to try that with my husband and stepson. My stepson claims he will eat raw spinach and arugula but not cooked spinach or arugula, my husband claims he won’t eat either, but when there is a little in a mixed salad he eats it just fine without any complaints. Both, however, wil eat any kind of lettuce.

I have been trying to incorporate more leafy dark green vegetables into our diet, but I have to be sneaky about it, by just adding a little bit of the “offensive” ingredient to the dishes I cook or in the salads I make. I have been able to get away with it quite well with spinach, so I will have to try kale next.

While I think of it. I have been remembering that my grandmother used to cook a lot of greens from her garden that were frequently the tops of root vegetables, that many people throw out. Can anyone tell me what ones they use and how they prepare them? I think my grandmother probably cooked turnip, radish, and beet tops, but I have no idea what else. I know she used to throw some of them in green salads as well, but not sure which ones work well in salads either.

I have been throwing in a small amount of chopped spinach in some of my pasta recipes and my meatloaf for well over a year now. They have assumed it is fresh basil, parsley, or oregano that I have been adding to them. I am certainly not about to tell them any different, since they love my pasta dishes and my meatloaf!


85 posted on 10/23/2011 12:27:36 PM PDT by Flamenco Lady
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To: All

I was traveling in the farming communities just south of Salem, Oregon this past week and ran across a wonderful farm stand with lots of fresh produce that was really well priced. I wish I lived closer as they were some of the most beautiful vegetables I have ever seen.

I bought a huge head of butter lettuce for only $1 (a small head in the regular grocery store is about $3 per head so we eat iceberg at $1 a head instead). I also bought a huge head of cabbage for 39 cents, a lot of apples for 75 cents per pound and gorgeous pears for 39 cents per pound.

They also had pints of any color of the most beautiful cherry tomatoes I have ever seen for $1.00 each. We picked up some orange ones for a nice salad accented with Fall colors. They also had peppers for 50 cents each. All of these were at least half of what the price usually is in my local discount markets, so I loaded up on fresh veggies.

They also had large pumpkins for $1.00 each. We picked one up and my daughters are going to draw the face on the pumpkin for Halloween with markers, this year instead of carving it, so after Halloween, I can cut it up and cook the pumpkin and of course roast the pumpkin seeds too!


86 posted on 10/23/2011 12:47:04 PM PDT by Flamenco Lady
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To: Flamenco Lady

Turnip, beets, chard, mustard. Haven’t tried radish or rutabaga, cabbage leaves work as cabbage rolls. kohlrabi, ( a cabbage varient) I told her it was a spicy type of water chestnut LOL, it worked. I have most of them coming up nicely in my winter garden right now.


87 posted on 10/23/2011 1:00:33 PM PDT by W. W. SMITH (Obama is an instrument of enslavement)
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To: W. W. SMITH

Do turnip, beet, chard, and mustard greens all work well in salads as well as cooked? I’m a northerner and I only remember my grandmother cooking them as I was growing up. I don’t recall ever having them in salads at all during my youth. My father didn’t like cooked greens of any kind, so my mother always gave hers to her mother to cook because my grandparents loved them.

My grandmother usually cooked hers with a little bacon, and either some onion or shallot and seasoned them with salt, pepper, and nutmeg. I liked them best, however, when she would cream them for a special holiday dinner and sprinkle parmesan cheese on top! YUM!


88 posted on 10/23/2011 1:26:38 PM PDT by Flamenco Lady
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To: Flamenco Lady

That reminds me of the story my sister-in-law and her husband told my (then) 7 year old nephew: I had baked some of my famous and very delicious oatmeal cookies as part of a housewarming gift to them (I’ll try to find the recipe and post it.) They told him they were broccoli cookies so he wouldn’t eat them and they could have them all to themselves. He always thought I really made broccoli cookies. True story, and it didn’t surprise me all that they did that.


89 posted on 10/23/2011 2:26:50 PM PDT by FrdmLvr (culture, language, borders)
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To: FrdmLvr

LOL! I will be watching for your oatmeal cookie recipe. I love oatmeal cookies!

I should tell my family I made broccoli cookies the next time I make chocolate chip cookies. Then I might actually get more than one! My chocolate chip cookies disappear in less than 24 hours unless I hide some of them. I always make a double batch and it makes over 70 cookies too! That is over 15 cookies each for the other four family members! Here is the recipe for the double batch of chocolate chip cookies. A friend gave the recipe to us a long time ago since I like soft and chewy cookies. Apparently everyone in the house likes soft and chewy cookies now too!

Soft Chocolate Chip Cookies

These amounts are for a double batch that makes a little over 70 cookies or so. Feel free to cut the recipe in half for a regular size batch of cookies but be prepared they disappear really fast!

4 1/2 cups all-purpose flour
2 teaspoons baking soda
2 cups butter, softened
1 1/2 cups packed brown sugar
1/2 cup white sugar
2 (3.4 ounce) packages instant vanilla pudding mix
4 eggs
2 teaspoons vanilla extract
4 cups semisweet chocolate chips
2 cups chopped walnuts (optional)

Directions

Preheat oven to 350 degrees F (175 degrees C). Sift together the flour and baking soda, set aside.

In a large bowl, cream together the butter, brown sugar, and white sugar. Beat in the instant pudding mix until blended. Stir in the eggs and vanilla. Blend in the flour mixture. Finally, stir in the chocolate chips and nuts. Drop cookies by rounded spoonfuls onto ungreased cookie sheets.

Bake for 10 to 12 minutes. Edges should be golden brown.


90 posted on 10/23/2011 4:09:59 PM PDT by Flamenco Lady
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To: Flamenco Lady

Instant pudding mix in cookies? Now THAT sound very interesting!

Thanks for adding the ounces of the pudding boxes
(what do you bet they shrink those too - and we won’t know until it’s too late - aargh)


91 posted on 10/23/2011 7:30:51 PM PDT by libertarian27 (Agenda21: Dept. of Life, Dept. of Liberty and the Dept. of Happiness)
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To: libertarian27

I think it is the pudding mix that keeps the cookies soft! All I can say is that we tried the recipe once and we were sold. Everyone asks us for the recipe now, whenever they taste them. Most of the time we leave the nuts out, since not everyone in the family likes nuts, and they are delicious either way.

For variation we have substituted chocolate pudding for the vanila pudding and have added chocolate mint chips, chocolate chips, or chocolate raspberry chips. All three of these versions were also delicious. I think they would be good at Christmas time using the chocolate pudding, chocolate chips and sprinkling some crushed candy canes on top as well, but we haven’t tried that yet.

Another thing we did try was using butterscotch pudding and adding butterscotch or caramel chips and adding some chopped pecans to the cookies. These too turned out great, but the adults liked them better than the kids, since the little ones like the chocolate chips.

I am sure white chocolate chips would be good in any of these versions of the cookies too. In fact I have been thinking about trying white chocolate chips with some chopped macademia nuts. We have even tried half chocolate chips and half caramel chips together and they were also great.

This is an easy cookie recipe to play around with different flavor chips and puddings. My daughters have loved being creative with it, but their favorite is still the original version.


92 posted on 10/23/2011 8:26:48 PM PDT by Flamenco Lady
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To: libertarian27

Here is another cookie recipe that was given to me that is one of my favorites. They are quick and easy to make and so good, so they are great cookies to make when you need to make up a batch of cookies quickly. I love to make these during the Holiday Season as quick bread mixes go on sale quite frequently between Halloween and the New Year.

Cranberry Pecan Sandies

Cookies:
1 package of Cranberry Orange quickbread mix (15.6 oz.)
½ cup of melted butter
2 tablespoons of orange juice
¾ cup of pecans
about 3 dozen pecan halves

Glaze:
1 cup of confectioner’s sugar
3-4 teaspoons of orange juice

Combine the first four ingredients and mix together, then fold in the ¾ cup of pecans. Roll dough into 1 inch balls and place about 1 inch apart on an ungreased cookie sheet. Flatten each cookie with a glass coated in cooking spray, and then press a pecan half onto the top of each cookie. Bake the cookies in a 350-degree oven (325 for dark colored cookie sheets) for 12-14 minutes or until lightly browned. Cool cookies for about a minute on the sheet, and then transfer to a wire rack with a cookie sheet underneath the wire rack to cool.

Mix up glaze and drizzle over cookies. The excess glaze will drip on to the cookie sheet underneath the wire rack instead of pooling on your counter.

This makes about 3 dozen small cookies.


93 posted on 10/23/2011 8:44:08 PM PDT by Flamenco Lady
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To: libertarian27; Scarpetta
Kimchi is easy to make, but it takes a little practice to be great. :)

Making kimchi with local ingredients

94 posted on 10/24/2011 2:45:40 AM PDT by Tamar1973 ("Never care what the other guy has, it is not yours and someone always has more."--isthisnickcool)
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To: libertarian27

You don’t have any of the weeks for October on your page?


95 posted on 10/24/2011 6:48:44 AM PDT by Netizen (Path to citizenship = Scamnesty. If you give it away, more will come. Who's pilfering your wallet?)
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To: libertarian27
I hope the formatting turns out right on this.


Banana-Nut Bundt Cake
2 3/4 cups all-purpose flour            
1/4 cup whole wheat flour
1 1/2 cups sugar
1 teaspoon baking soda
1 teaspoon ground cinnamon          
3 eggs, beaten (egg beaters)
1/4 cup vegetable oil
1/2 cup applesauce
1/4 cup apple butter
2 cups finely chopped ripe bananas (about 3 medium)
1 can (8 ounces) crushed pineapple, undrained
2 teaspoons vanilla extract
1/2 cup flaked coconut
1 cup chopped nuts
1 tsp flax meal (optional)

In a large bowl, combine the flour, sugar, baking soda and cinnamon. In another bowl, combine the eggs, oil, bananas, applesauce, apple butter, pineapple and vanilla; stir into dry ingredients just until combined. Fold in coconut and nuts. Pour into a greased 10-in. fluted tube pan.  Bake at 350° for 60-70 minutes or until a toothpick inserted near the center comes out clean. Cool for 10 minutes before removing cake from pan to a wire rack to cool completely. Yield: 12-16 servings.

96 posted on 10/24/2011 7:18:35 AM PDT by Netizen (Path to citizenship = Scamnesty. If you give it away, more will come. Who's pilfering your wallet?)
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To: Flamenco Lady

Sometimes that is the only way to do it. :)


97 posted on 10/24/2011 7:48:02 AM PDT by Netizen (Path to citizenship = Scamnesty. If you give it away, more will come. Who's pilfering your wallet?)
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To: Netizen

***place holder***


98 posted on 10/24/2011 8:10:49 AM PDT by trillabodilla (Jesus Saves)
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To: Netizen

I’m HTML lazy :>)

I put three months in at once a couple of weeks ago - that was a pain - aargh....


99 posted on 10/24/2011 3:06:22 PM PDT by libertarian27 (Agenda21: Dept. of Life, Dept. of Liberty and the Dept. of Happiness)
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To: Flamenco Lady

You mentioned having pumpkin to cook after Halloween. I came across some recipes while looking for carving templates.

http://www.bukisa.com/articles/184505_pumpkin-pickles-recipe

There is a pumpkin, orange jam and pickled pumpkin recipes at the link, along with a couple of others.


100 posted on 10/25/2011 11:44:27 AM PDT by Netizen (Path to citizenship = Scamnesty. If you give it away, more will come. Who's pilfering your wallet?)
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