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Fort find adds to potted history of Romans' boozing
Shields Gazette ^ | Tuesday, October 25, 2011 | Joseph Tulip

Posted on 10/28/2011 9:08:07 PM PDT by SunkenCiv

The "spectacular" discovery of ancient pottery has revealed how the Romans wined and dined here in South Tyneside almost 2,000 years ago.

And far from sampling the delights of our local brews, it seems they still preferred to ship wines from the Mediterranean to their northern outpost.

Several pieces of a 3ft-tall wine jug have been found during an excavation just outside Arbeia Roman Fort.

The pottery will be stuck together to recreate the metre-high jug, which would have contained numerous litres of wine when it was imported to the fort between AD 250 and AD 350.

...archaeologist Nick Hodgson... is project manager for Tyne and Wear Archives and Museums, which conducted the dig at Arbeia with a team of volunteers, from June to September...

"Containers like this were used for bulk transportation. This is very significant because it is of a rather unusual late Roman type, which only started being imported from AD 250.

"It shows that the Romans still had a taste for Mediterranean wine at that period -- they had not gone native and adapted to local beer or wine.

"They were still importing it to South Shields. It's a spectacular and significant find."

The container is made of clay, and includes volcanic rock, and is believed to have been imported on a ship from Campania in Italy.

The jug was found in a roadside gully during the excavations, on the corner of Baring Street and Fort Street, South Shields. Smaller pieces of other similar jugs were also found.

A stone building was also discovered, which suggests there was still occupation and activity in the area in about AD 260, when most civilian settlements outside forts in the north of England had been abandoned.

(Excerpt) Read more at shieldsgazette.com ...


TOPICS: History; Science; Travel
KEYWORDS: godsgravesglyphs; romanempire; zymurgy
SPECTACULAR FINDS ... archaelogist Nick Hodgson.

SPECTACULAR FINDS ... archaelogist Nick Hodgson.

1 posted on 10/28/2011 9:08:11 PM PDT by SunkenCiv
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To: JRandomFreeper; decimon; StayAt HomeMother; Ernest_at_the_Beach; 1010RD; 21twelve; 24Karet; ...

 GGG managers are SunkenCiv, StayAt HomeMother & Ernest_at_the_Beach
To all -- please ping me to other topics which are appropriate for the GGG list.


2 posted on 10/28/2011 9:08:53 PM PDT by SunkenCiv (It's never a bad time to FReep this link -- https://secure.freerepublic.com/donate/)
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To: SunkenCiv

3 posted on 10/28/2011 9:17:30 PM PDT by quantim (Victory is not relative, it is absolute.)
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To: SunkenCiv
Fort find adds to potted history of Romans' boozing

Imagine that.

4 posted on 10/28/2011 10:07:43 PM PDT by martin_fierro (< |:)~)
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To: SunkenCiv

the general area of hadrian’s wall is large enough to need many days (maybe a week) to visit, walk, see, etc., and not get ruin exhaustion (too many ruins in a single day). I have been to some parts of it, and hope to be able to take time off to simply stay in north england a while later in my life. It is simply full of stuff to see, learn, do.

Finding a bar with a good cellarman centrally located would be a big plus as well.


5 posted on 10/28/2011 10:31:10 PM PDT by WoofDog123
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To: SunkenCiv

Can they determine from those shards whether they contained wine or wine vinegar? A great deal of wine was made for vinegar in those days for medical and other antiseptic purposes and it was and is quite effective.


6 posted on 10/28/2011 11:49:37 PM PDT by TigersEye (Life is about choices. Your choices. Make good ones.)
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To: WoofDog123

“cellerman” ?


7 posted on 10/29/2011 5:00:05 AM PDT by Eric in the Ozarks
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To: SunkenCiv

Roman kegger.


8 posted on 10/29/2011 6:15:49 AM PDT by blueunicorn6 ("A crack shot and a good dancer")
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To: martin_fierro
The Canadian scholar Max Nelson has published a book about beer in the Greek and Roman world--The Barbarian's Beverage.
9 posted on 10/29/2011 6:59:45 AM PDT by Verginius Rufus
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To: blueunicorn6

:’)


10 posted on 10/29/2011 10:11:15 AM PDT by SunkenCiv (It's never a bad time to FReep this link -- https://secure.freerepublic.com/donate/)
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To: TigersEye

They would have made vinegar, but when an armed cohort wanders in, thirsty from the field, best approach is to serve the freakin’ wine. :’)

Vinegar was one of the barter items Roman soldiers rec’d as pay. The other was salt.


11 posted on 10/29/2011 10:13:31 AM PDT by SunkenCiv (It's never a bad time to FReep this link -- https://secure.freerepublic.com/donate/)
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To: WoofDog123

A pub? Near Scotland? How farfetched. ;’)


12 posted on 10/29/2011 10:29:50 AM PDT by SunkenCiv (It's never a bad time to FReep this link -- https://secure.freerepublic.com/donate/)
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Lost Roman camp that protected against Germanic hordes found
http://www.freerepublic.com/focus/chat/2799502/posts


13 posted on 10/29/2011 10:51:02 AM PDT by SunkenCiv (It's never a bad time to FReep this link -- https://secure.freerepublic.com/donate/)
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To: SunkenCiv
LOL Yeah, serve wine and disappear for a while.

I was just wondering if they actually could distinguish between a vessel that had contained wine and one that had contained wine vinegar. I would not be surprised if that is possible but it sounds like a difficult task.

14 posted on 10/29/2011 11:28:30 AM PDT by TigersEye (Life is about choices. Your choices. Make good ones.)
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To: TigersEye
>>I was just wondering if they actually could distinguish between a vessel that had contained wine and one that had contained wine vinegar.<<

I think they can...Bobby Ballard can. ;)

http://news.nationalgeographic.com/news/2003/01/0110_030113_blacksea.html

15 posted on 10/29/2011 11:35:42 AM PDT by Daffynition (“There are no compacts between lions and men, and wolves and lambs have no concord.” ~ Homer)
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To: Daffynition

Thanks, Daffy! That is certainly close to an answer. Olive oil and fish would certainly leave a residue easily distinguished from wine. Oily substances would also have a much greater chance of surviving the centuries than those that are water soluble. There probably are chemical differences between wine and vinegar that would leave some trace fixed in the ceramic.


16 posted on 10/29/2011 12:08:23 PM PDT by TigersEye (Life is about choices. Your choices. Make good ones.)
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To: Eric in the Ozarks

quality of real ale in british pubs depends on the cellarman handling the beer.


17 posted on 10/29/2011 3:52:34 PM PDT by WoofDog123
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To: WoofDog123

As I suspected...


18 posted on 10/30/2011 5:47:21 AM PDT by Eric in the Ozarks
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