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Forrester Report says 'power users' have Macs at office
Puget Sound Business Journal ^ | Date: Wednesday, November 2, 2011, 11:19am PDT | by Cromwell Schubarth, Multimedia/Research Editor

Posted on 11/02/2011 4:19:29 PM PDT by Swordmaker


Forrester Research last week recommended corporate IT departments
let workers use Macs on their networks because these employees are
more likely to be power users, the ones working longer hours, being
more productive and making more money.

The folks at Forrester Research    reversed themselves last week with the recommendation that corporate IT departments need to make it easier for workers to use Mac computers and devices. The tech research firm had long told the same IT departments not to bother accommodating devices from Apple Inc.   

Why the change of mind?

Forrester says it is because the most productive employees, what it dubs "power users," are already using Macs, anyways.

Analyst David Johnson wrote in the report, "It's time to repeal prohibition and take decisive action. Mac users are your HEROes and you should enable them not hinder them."

Forrester uses the acronym HERO for Highly Empowered and Resourceful Operatives, what it finds are "the 17% of information workers who use new technologies and find innovative ways to be more productive and serve customers more effectively." The report could be a troubling sign for Microsoft    (NYSE: MSFT), which continues to rely on sales of its signature Windows operating system -- including placement on PCs in offices worldwide -- for a huge part of its revenue base.

Johnson said that a new survey found "most of the Macs today are being freewheeled into the office by executives, top sales reps, and other workaholics. Forrester believes this is the same demographic that we're now calling the "power laptop user."

Forrester found that such "power laptop users" work more hours and make more money.

Many of them are already buying MacBook Pros with their own money because their company only supplies Windows-based laptops, the report says.

But Forrester says it found 41 percent of businesses it surveyed are now blocking access to their networks with employee-owned Macs, a situation it says must end.

"Stand in the way and you will eventually get run over," Forrester says.

The report offers six steps for IT departments to do to help Mac users access their enterprises and gives three case studies of companies that have done it.


TOPICS: Business/Economy; Computers/Internet
KEYWORDS: 666; bill; devil; gates

1 posted on 11/02/2011 4:19:32 PM PDT by Swordmaker
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To: ~Kim4VRWC's~; 1234; Abundy; Action-America; acoulterfan; AFreeBird; Airwinger; Aliska; altair; ...
Forrester Research reversed it's long standing advice and now recommends allowing Macs in the Enterprise office for the best results, especially for the best workers!—PING!


Apple Macs in the Enterprise Ping!

Please!
No Flame Wars!
Discuss technical issues, software, and hardware.
Don't attack people!
PLEASE! Don't respond to the Anti-Apple Thread Trolls!
IGNORE THEM!!!

If you want on or off the Mac Ping List, Freepmail me.

2 posted on 11/02/2011 4:21:32 PM PDT by Swordmaker (This tag line is a Microsoft product "insult" free zone.)
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To: Swordmaker

Sure. Whatever.


3 posted on 11/02/2011 4:22:17 PM PDT by NakedRampage (Puttin' the "stud" in Bible study)
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To: Swordmaker

My IT staff prefers ‘em....


4 posted on 11/02/2011 4:23:29 PM PDT by xenob
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To: Swordmaker
Ha ha, Microsoft.
5 posted on 11/02/2011 4:28:21 PM PDT by aruanan
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To: Swordmaker
But Forrester says it found 41 percent of businesses it surveyed are now blocking access to their networks with employee-owned Macs, a situation it says must end.

Any company that handles privileged customer information that could be used for identity theft and lets employee owned compters onto it's network is eventually going to pay dearly for it.

6 posted on 11/02/2011 4:28:51 PM PDT by tacticalogic
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To: Swordmaker
Forrester Research last week recommended corporate IT departments let workers use Macs on their networks because these employees are more likely to be power users, the ones working longer hours, being more productive and making more money.

Yeah, sure.
7 posted on 11/02/2011 4:32:48 PM PDT by microgood
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To: Swordmaker

Bah hah ahah


8 posted on 11/02/2011 4:37:33 PM PDT by jonatron (This is the Land of the Free, the Home of the Brave.)
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To: tacticalogic

Gee most M$ users want to be free to do all the power stuff, yet you would bind them down. How Steve of you.


9 posted on 11/02/2011 4:42:31 PM PDT by itsahoot (There was a bloodless coup in 08, and no one seemed to notice. God help us.)
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To: itsahoot
Gee most M$ users want to be free to do all the power stuff, yet you would bind them down. How Steve of you.

How about a compromise - I'll let them do all the "power stuff", but they can only do it with your personal information.

10 posted on 11/02/2011 4:47:57 PM PDT by tacticalogic
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To: microgood

This really about the VPs that bring thier employee owned iPads into work and create all sorts of new attack vectors for hackers. Truth - Mac OWNERS are more susceptible to social engineering attacks because they falsly think that Mac’s are safer than PCs ... ducking for cover now that I made myself a target for the Apple hit squad!


11 posted on 11/02/2011 5:01:03 PM PDT by RainMan
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To: Swordmaker

MAC Ping!


12 posted on 11/02/2011 5:32:12 PM PDT by TribalPrincess2U (They vote twice, we'll vote three times. AND DONATE TO FR MORE!)
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Don't rely on the Left Wing Lame Stream Media for your world news

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Please take this generous offer into consideration!

13 posted on 11/02/2011 5:35:22 PM PDT by RedMDer (Forward With Confidence!)
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To: tacticalogic
> Any company that handles privileged customer information that could be used for identity theft and lets employee owned compters onto it's network is eventually going to pay dearly for it.

As a rule I would say that employee-owned computers -- OF ANY TYPE -- do not belong on a corporate network. I've maintained that rule on the corporate network I administer and it has worked out well.

The cases where an employee has taken their company-issued (Windows) computer home and let their kids play on it (against the rules) have been awful -- they bring it back in and it's filthy (software-wise) and causes problems.

I think Macs can be just as productive in general, sometimes more so and sometimes less so, than Windows PCs. Depends on what you have to do with the computer. But there's no justification or excuse for letting uncontrolled machines on a corporate network, regardless of operating system.

14 posted on 11/02/2011 5:43:21 PM PDT by dayglored (Listen, strange women lying in ponds distributing swords is no basis for a system of government!)
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To: RainMan; Swordmaker
"Truth - Mac OWNERS are more susceptible to social engineering attacks"

REAL TRUTH: You can't name a single piece of hackware that can run on a Mac -- and then infect a PC.

15 posted on 11/02/2011 6:53:44 PM PDT by TXnMA ("Allah": Satan's current alias...)
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To: xenob

MY Brother works as a regional director for the Big X corp.They started accommodating macs about 7 years ago.He came to us for a crash course on them...we told him double or single click....LOL


16 posted on 11/02/2011 8:26:34 PM PDT by chris_bdba
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To: RainMan

You would be wrong about that but don’t let facts get in the way of your fantasy....


17 posted on 11/02/2011 8:28:03 PM PDT by chris_bdba
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To: Swordmaker

“Stand in the way and you will eventually get run over,” Forrester says.

It was that way for PCs in the early years. I designed and coded for mainframes and some of the managers would sneak PCs into their departments and start doing their own thing. The IT dept was livid when they found these, but the managers would not be suppressed - it was just too easy for the users to get what they needed with the PCs.

I think if employees want to use Macs, then there should be some accommodations made for them with company-provided machines and specific terms of use.

My own company has both Macs and PCs, and we are starting to incorporate iPads into the workflow for those who are often on the road.


18 posted on 11/03/2011 6:12:25 AM PDT by Bookwoman ("...and I am unanimous in this...")
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To: tacticalogic

“Any company that handles privileged customer information that could be used for identity theft and lets employee owned compters onto it’s network is eventually going to pay dearly for it.”

A better approach is:

“Any company that handles privileged customer information that doesn’t properly segregate it at the network level is eventually going to pay dearly for it.”

USB drives are far more ubiquitous than Macs. Also, the vast majority of positions at almost all companies requires no access to such information.


19 posted on 11/03/2011 6:33:36 AM PDT by PreciousLiberty (Cain '12 - Take Back America!!!)
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To: PreciousLiberty
USB drives are far more ubiquitous than Macs. Also, the vast majority of positions at almost all companies requires no access to such information.

Active Directory Group Policy can disable the use of USB drives on domain-joined Windows computers, and prevent network access by non-domain joined computers. Macs cannot be joined to an Active Directory network, or be controlled by AD Group Policy.

As far as whether a "position" requires access to the information, once non-secured computers are allowed onto the network then you're faced with trying to control who can and cannot use those computers.

If you have that kind of information on your network, there is no rationializing allowing employees to access that data from a non-corporate computer as being anything but very bad practice.

20 posted on 11/03/2011 6:57:19 AM PDT by tacticalogic
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To: tacticalogic

“Active Directory Group Policy can disable the use of USB drives on domain-joined Windows computers, and prevent network access by non-domain joined computers. Macs cannot be joined to an Active Directory network, or be controlled by AD Group Policy.”

Sure, and then (as usual) the question becomes: “How much do I want to restrict my users productivity in the name of security?”

So now you’ve locked down USB drives, have you also locked down email? Access to SSL enabled websites? Disabled writing optical media? Perhaps you should just get rid of those pesky computers altogether.

“As far as whether a “position” requires access to the information, once non-secured computers are allowed onto the network then you’re faced with trying to control who can and cannot use those computers.”

You’re referring to the “network” as a monolithic entity, which it is not. There are devices called “routers” that can efficiently and extremely securely control which devices have access to given network resources. Making sure “employee owned computers” can’t access sensitive information is trivial.

“If you have that kind of information on your network, there is no rationializing allowing employees to access that data from a non-corporate computer as being anything but very bad practice.”

Nor have I said anything that disagrees with that stance. Company provided Macs (perhaps running Windows in a VM) are a different issue.


21 posted on 11/03/2011 7:43:04 AM PDT by PreciousLiberty (Cain '12 - Take Back America!!!)
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To: PreciousLiberty
Sure, and then (as usual) the question becomes: “How much do I want to restrict my users productivity in the name of security?”

No, it doesn't. We don't hire people who can't be productive using the computers we provide for them. If they can be productive on a Mac, they can be productive on a Windows based computer if they want to.

We're not going to re-architect the infrastructure to accomodate a handful of whining hardware snobs.

22 posted on 11/03/2011 7:57:17 AM PDT by tacticalogic
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To: tacticalogic
Sure, and then (as usual) the question becomes: “How much do I want to restrict my users productivity in the name of security?”

"No, it doesn't. We don't hire people who can't be productive using the computers we provide for them. If they can be productive on a Mac, they can be productive on a Windows based computer if they want to."

Great job missing the point entirely... Try reading it again.

"We're not going to re-architect the infrastructure to accomodate a handful of whining hardware snobs."

I bet the turnover rate among your best people is plenty high. You epitomize why many folks hate IT/network admins.

BTW, the best attributes of Macs involve software, not hardware.

23 posted on 11/03/2011 9:41:54 AM PDT by PreciousLiberty (Cain '12 - Take Back America!!!)
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To: PreciousLiberty
You epitomize why many folks hate IT/network admins.

You epitomize the people the term "Macbot" was invented for.

Now, do you want to keep throwning insults and see if you can turn it into a full-blown flame war?

24 posted on 11/03/2011 10:37:24 AM PDT by tacticalogic
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To: tacticalogic
"You epitomize the people the term "Macbot" was invented for."

LOL! Not at all, though I do like to use and support the best available tech. After all, Macs do run more software titles than any other PC.

"Now, do you want to keep throwning insults and see if you can turn it into a full-blown flame war?"

Let's see who was first to use incendiary language...oh yeah it was you with your immortal "We're not going to re-architect the infrastructure to accomodate a handful of whining hardware snobs." Also, by the way, it's "accommodate".

Now, be a good PHB/BOFH and run along... We'll somehow make do without your "wisdom".

25 posted on 11/03/2011 12:48:38 PM PDT by PreciousLiberty (Cain '12 - Take Back America!!!)
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To: PreciousLiberty
You started with the personal attacks.

You just stay there in your little Mac "ecosystem", and I'll stay here in the real world.

We're an IBM mainframe shop, and I've been at least as accomodating to Apple as they've been to us, historically. They'll get exactly the consideration they deserve from me, and their syncopants can come along for the ride.

26 posted on 11/03/2011 1:05:25 PM PDT by tacticalogic
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To: tacticalogic

‘You just stay there in your little Mac “ecosystem”, and I’ll stay here in the real world.’

It’s hilarious that you’d say that, given that Apple has almost twice the market cap of IBM at the moment. It seems it’s doing a lot of things right, no?

I’ll let you have the last word since you seem to feel compelled to do so.


27 posted on 11/03/2011 1:30:53 PM PDT by PreciousLiberty (Cain '12 - Take Back America!!!)
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To: PreciousLiberty
It seems it’s doing a lot of things right, no?

They're not doing anything I need, despite your apparent belief that you know what I need, how my organization and infrastructure works, and who's accessing what kind of data on my network better than I do.

Where did you get the idea that because they're making a lot of money everybody needs to buy what they're selling?

28 posted on 11/03/2011 1:41:41 PM PDT by tacticalogic
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To: tacticalogic
they can only do it with your personal information.

The only information that remains personal in this life, is something you just thought up. Little can be concealed today, especially if you use a computer.

Soon all your medical information including DNA will be controlled by the IRS, and unlike ICE, they will find you anywhere.

29 posted on 11/04/2011 12:45:27 PM PDT by itsahoot (There was a bloodless coup in 08, and no one seemed to notice. God help us.)
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