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APS superintendent says handcuffing boy, 7, was inappropriate
KOB ^ | 11/16/2011

Posted on 11/17/2011 9:34:15 AM PST by Altariel

The Albuquerque Public Schools superintendent is speaking out after a seven-year-old autistic boy was handcuffed at school.

Maria Quesada spoke with KOB Eyewitness News 4 Monday night and said she was outraged to find her son cuffed at school.

Photos showed marks left on his wrists.

According to APS police documents, the boy was out of control and unplugging cords from outlets, throwing chairs and kicking a teacher and a police officer at Mary Ann Binford Elementary School.

Quesada said she does not think the 4-foot tall, 50-pound boy deserved to be handcuffed.

Superintendent Winston Brooks spoke Wednesday afternoon, weighing in on the situation.

"Under absolutely no circumstances it is appropriate to handcuff an elementary aged child in this school district. Period," Brooks stated.

Brooks said the officer who handcuffed the boy is on paid administrative leave.


TOPICS: Miscellaneous
KEYWORDS: albuquerque; autism; newmexico; publicschool
This kid's problem is not his (alleged) autism.

His problem is his enabling mother.

1 posted on 11/17/2011 9:34:20 AM PST by Altariel
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To: Altariel

The kid is not socially able to be in a public school.


2 posted on 11/17/2011 9:41:10 AM PST by MrEdd (Heck? Geewhiz Cripes, thats the place where people who don't believe in Gosh think they aint going.)
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To: Altariel
you'll find as the leftist continue to take over, that the sick,the weak, the elderly, and the disabled will be routinely treated with Nazi like punishments.....

expediency of course....

3 posted on 11/17/2011 9:41:38 AM PST by cherry
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To: Altariel
Agree, but don a flame suit for those very same enablers who believe that their "precious little autistic angels" should be accommodated by allowing them to slow down learning and cause outbursts when they should be in special education.

Mainstreaming is feel good liberal PC idiocy that harms both the mentally disabled and functional children.

4 posted on 11/17/2011 9:47:07 AM PST by Clemenza ("History, I believe, furnishes no example of a priest-ridden people maintaining a free civil governm)
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To: Altariel

"Under absolutely no circumstances it is appropriate to handcuff an elementary aged child in this school district. Period," Brooks stated.
 
 
 
Really? And you'd rather have the kid loose and unrestrained so that he does further harm to himself and others?
 
Good to know. Now go away. You're fired.


5 posted on 11/17/2011 9:54:16 AM PST by Responsibility2nd (NO LIBS! This means liberals AND libertarians (same thing) NO LIBS!)
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To: cherry

I suspect “Mijo” hasn’t had too many lessons of the “actions have consequences” sort. Better that he learns those at seven than at seventeen.


6 posted on 11/17/2011 10:05:37 AM PST by Altariel (`)
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To: Altariel

The mom’s right. He shouldn’t have been handcuffed. He should have been hog tied so he couldn’t continue kicking people.


7 posted on 11/17/2011 10:21:09 AM PST by bgill (The Obama administration is staging a coup. Wake up, America, before it's too late.)
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To: Altariel
. . . the boy was out of control and unplugging cords from outlets, throwing chairs and kicking a teacher and a police officer . . .

We can handcuff him and get blamed for that, or we can physically restrain him and get compared to Penn State's issue with young boys. Once the situation reached that level, handcuffs were not out of line. The correct answer would be for the enabling mom to teach her child that actions have consequences, even for him, and that he needs to learn coping mechanisms. The correct answer for the school would have been to distract him before he reached that level. I don't have much hope that common sense will break out on either side of the school-family divide in this situation.

8 posted on 11/17/2011 10:22:51 AM PST by Pollster1 (Natural born citizen of the USA, with the birth certificate to prove it)
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To: Altariel
Quesada said she does not think the 4-foot tall, 50-pound boy deserved to be handcuffed.

Right...he deserved a damn good "smack"!!

9 posted on 11/17/2011 10:40:04 AM PST by GoldenPup
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I see the folks at FR have again taken to advocating violence against children, and children with mental disabilities again.

No complaining when this site gets labeled as a hate site advocating violence.


10 posted on 11/17/2011 10:49:00 AM PST by AlmaKing
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To: Pollster1

“The correct answer for the school would have been to distract him before he reached that level.”

Adults can’t always be around to “distract” children before they throw a fit. The ultimate lesson that a child learns if adults are constantly “distracting” them to avoid physical violence is “if other people don’t distract me/placate me in time, my violent behavior is their fault.”

All children need to learn to control their behavior without reaching that level (unless the situation warrants kicking or attacking an adult, such as fighting off an adult assailant).


11 posted on 11/17/2011 10:54:39 AM PST by Altariel (`)
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To: Altariel

>>>This kid’s problem is not his (alleged) autism.
His problem is his enabling mother. <<<

And you know this, how?

The kid clearly needed to be disciplined, but handcuffing a 7 year old is unnecessary, idiotic and abusive.


12 posted on 11/17/2011 11:20:47 AM PST by Above My Pay Grade
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To: AlmaKing

This child assaulted his authority figures. He made a choice to attack his teacher and a police officer. He injured himself trying to escape the handcuffs (indicating that there was a reasonable likelihood that the assaults would have continued if he were not restrained).

If a few teachers had tackled him and held him down on the floor, Mommy Dearest would be filing a lawsuit for that.

The sooner children learn that attacking adults (outside of self-defense to prevent from becoming a victim of assault) is a Very. Bad. Idea., the better.

He disrupted the classroom, threw desks (which could have easily injured other children in the room) and physically assaulted multiple adults; he received the consequences for his actions. It’s a very conservative lesson.


13 posted on 11/17/2011 11:24:24 AM PST by Altariel (`)
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To: Above My Pay Grade

The mother did not think that a boy who threw chairs, disrupted a class, kicked his teacher and kicked a police officer “deserved to be handcuffed”. That is enablement.

The boy assaulted at least two people (possibly others that we don’t know about it).

You can’t spank him for that in today’s schools.

Holding him on the ground or against the wall would almost certainly result in a lawsuit from Mother Dearest.

He became a danger to himself and others, and he learned that (at school) there are consequences for that behavior.

Moreover, Mommy gave *permission* for “Mijo” to be restrained. Now she is complaining about the very restraint she gave the school *permission* to do.


14 posted on 11/17/2011 11:53:59 AM PST by Altariel (`)
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To: Altariel
Adults can’t always be around to “distract” children before they throw a fit. The ultimate lesson that a child learns if adults are constantly “distracting” them to avoid physical violence is “if other people don’t distract me/placate me in time, my violent behavior is their fault.” All children need to learn to control their behavior without reaching that level (unless the situation warrants kicking or attacking an adult, such as fighting off an adult assailant).

We disagree. I have neighbors with several autistic children, and learning to deal with frustration is a process that takes time and practice for kids dealing with that challenge. By distracting them just enough that they can handle the situation, we help them to build coping skills. It's not a perfect "personal responsibility" answer, but it is a perfect human answer. It's not about being an entertainer or doing everything for the kid but about providing enough support that problems are within the range that a child can then handle.

I also know kids whose parents use a diagnosis as a crutch for a child who is essentially normal except for the bad parenting, but this is probably not entirely one of those issues. Even the worst parents (and this mother might be close to that line) can't turn a child that young into a monster like this unless there is also an underlying problem. The school should build toward a point where this child can handle frustration and disappointment more naturally and with less personal supervision, but demanding that this 7 y/o do so without help is not going to be the best answer for this child or for the other children who have to be around this child.

15 posted on 11/17/2011 12:07:33 PM PST by Pollster1 (Natural born citizen of the USA, with the birth certificate to prove it)
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To: MrEdd

Apparently not.

Since Mommy Dearest gave the school permission to restrain him, it may be difficult for her to win a court case, if it comes to that.

“Quesada said she gave school staff permission to restrain her autistic son but did not think that meant handcuffing him.”

http://www.kob.com/article/stories/s2372848.shtml


16 posted on 11/17/2011 12:09:38 PM PST by Altariel (`)
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To: Pollster1

“It’s not a perfect “personal responsibility” answer, but it is a perfect human answer. It’s not about being an entertainer or doing everything for the kid but about providing enough support that problems are within the range that a child can then handle. “

Perhaps that approach works for your neighbor’s children (assuming mom and dad are gradually less responsible for distracting Junior as the kids age).

However, there are plenty of parents who ignore/downplay willful defiance, malice and premeditated decisions to attack made by their autistic children and try to sweep those characteristics under the rug. Special needs children need to build character too, and such parents only make their job harder when they justify their child’s immoral, (and in this case, illegal) behavior.

There are responsible conservative parents of special needs children. Those are the ones who don’t tolerate bad behavior in public and correct their children (as needed and in a manner that they know their children respond to in order to discourage repeated bad behavior). They have a tough job, they do it well, and they are respected and appreciated for it. In my experience, they’re also the ones who dislike it the most when an adult hides behind “my boy can’t be held responsible. He’s autistic.” as an excuse.

Unfortunately, responsible conservative parents are not the sort that typically call the news stations to report on how horribly Little Johnny was treated; therefore, we don’t hear about them as often. It’s a shame.


17 posted on 11/17/2011 12:29:43 PM PST by Altariel (`)
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To: Altariel

A 7 year old autistic child made a choice to attack? I just write you off as ignorant.

File a lawsuit - whah whah whah !!!!!!!!!!!!!

You sound like what you complain about.


18 posted on 11/17/2011 12:38:32 PM PST by AlmaKing
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To: Altariel

You don’t sound like a parent much less a ‘responsible, conservative’ parent. You sound like an ignorant fool asking for an a** kicking.


19 posted on 11/17/2011 12:40:23 PM PST by AlmaKing
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To: Altariel
APS superintendent says handcuffing boy, 7, was inappropriate

I agree. It sounds like a streight jacket would have been more appropriate.

20 posted on 11/17/2011 12:46:40 PM PST by Harmless Teddy Bear (*Philosophy lesson 117-22b: Anyone who demands to be respected is undeserving of it.*)
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To: AlmaKing

I have a 5 year old in a class with a special needs child & a special needs 3 year old daughter at home. I will tell you FROM A CONSERVATIVE PARENT it is work dealing with a special needs child but we accept that she can not have free reign over anyplace she is at because she can’t always make good choices (one reason they are called special needs!)
But I am extremely unhappy that my son is forced to tolerate a violent & disruptive special needs child in his class. My son has been spit on, kicked & hit by this child and so have other kids. His teacher told us that the special needs child “has every right to be in the class & the school is working on how to make it work”.
We would not expect our daughter to be in a class that she was causing harm to other children and/or disrupting the education of other children.


21 posted on 11/17/2011 1:36:09 PM PST by lilyramone (The only time success comes before work is in the dictionary)
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22 posted on 11/17/2011 1:43:25 PM PST by TheOldLady (FReepmail me to get ON or OFF the ZOT LIGHTNING ping list)
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To: Altariel

The boy is 7 years old. He probably weighs about 50 lbs. If you need handcuffs to control a 7 year old boy, you don’t belong in law enforcement. Most officers show more restraint with 200 lb. thugs, not to mention OWS weirdos.

Heck, I guess he should be glad they didn’t taser the tot.

The mother may or may not enable the boy’s bad behavior. We don’t have enough information to know. She may well be a part of our national problem of adults no longer knowing how to keep children under control, but there is no doubt the police officer who felt the need to handcuff the “dangerous” 7 year old child is.

In my day a real cop could grunt a command at a child (and most adults) and get them to comply with no force at all. Too many (but certainly not all) modern cops have lost that ability to command respect and project an air of being in control.

I blame poor training, forced “diversity” at the expense of competence and fitness for law enforcement, bogus “brutality” lawsuits, and more recently, tasers being used in place of taking psychological command over a situation.


23 posted on 11/17/2011 1:52:51 PM PST by Above My Pay Grade
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To: Altariel
"Under absolutely no circumstances it is appropriate to handcuff an elementary aged child in this school district. Period," Brooks stated."

Just leave them be to do physical harm to the rest of the children present. Brilliant reasoning Mr. Brooks.


24 posted on 11/17/2011 6:11:37 PM PST by ex91B10 (We've tried the Soap Box,the Ballot Box and the Jury Box; one box left.)
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To: Above My Pay Grade

“In my day a real cop could grunt a command at a child (and most adults) and get them to comply with no force at all. Too many (but certainly not all) modern cops have lost that ability to command respect and project an air of being in control.”

Even twenty years ago, children had a better understanding of the societal rule that police, teachers and parents were to be respected and obeyed. Moreover, parents were more likely to discipline their children at home and not take the “Billy is a victim of MEEEEEAAAAAN adults” approach.

In public elementary schools today, there is not the discipline of even FIVE years ago, much less twenty or fifty years ago. Thank liberal parents and lawsuits for that, for demanding the removal of effective punishments (even corporal punishments) from the schools.

This seven year old challenged the authority of his teacher and a police officer. He discovered that there is a consequence for that behavior. Had he behaved the same way twenty years ago, he would have been held down and paddled. Unfortunately, the liberals consider that cruel and unusual punishment. There was a time when the teacher would have pulled out a whip to whip him for disturbing the class (even BEFORE any desks were turned over).

In this scenario, Little Mijo is on a rampage, throwing desks and attacking adults. The other seven year olds are undoubtedly frightened and the adults are doing what they can, in our lawsuit crazy era, to get him controlled without losing their jobs.

Mommy Dearest previously gave the school *permission* to restrain him. Now that the school (heaven forbid!) acted on a discipline route that she *permitted them to choose if the situation warranted it*, she is outraged.

This is a kid who made bad choices and had his hands handcuffed behind his back as a result. He wasn’t beaten until his buttocks were bloodied and bruised, as might have been the case twenty years ago. He wasn’t horsewhipped, as he would have been 100 years ago. His hands were put in handcuffs, the handcuff marks received due to his attempts to escape the cuffs (and potentially, continue the assaults).

He challenged his authority figures. They responded to the challenge.


25 posted on 11/17/2011 8:50:58 PM PST by Altariel (`)
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To: ex91B10

Exactly. If one of the other schoolchildren were hurt (and I’m surprised we don’t have any reports of hurt children given the flying desks) the school would be dealing with a lawsuit.

This kid shouldn’t be in a public school. He clearly can’t handle it.


26 posted on 11/17/2011 8:53:04 PM PST by Altariel (`)
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To: lilyramone

Keep it up! Your children are fortunate to have such a good mother.

It’s a crime that your son is being assaulted by this other child. I hope each assault is being reported in his school file.


27 posted on 11/17/2011 9:06:47 PM PST by Altariel (`)
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To: AlmaKing

Yes, autistic children do decide to attack others.

“In kids with autism, aggressive behavior is often used as a way to get attention, obtain something that they want, or get out of doing something that they don’t want to do. And some kids act aggressively merely because they find pleasure in acting that way and watching others’ reactions to their behavior. “

http://www.everydayhealth.com/autism/managing-aggression-in-kids.aspx

You know, one might almost call this list of reasons “character flaws”. Amazing. Autistic kids have those too.


28 posted on 11/17/2011 9:10:23 PM PST by Altariel (`)
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To: AlmaKing

Thank you for confirming that you cannot rebut what I actually wrote.


29 posted on 11/17/2011 9:11:12 PM PST by Altariel (`)
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To: Altariel
meet the administation's new head of restraint:


30 posted on 11/18/2011 9:41:24 AM PST by WOBBLY BOB (See ya later, debt inflator ! Gone in 4 (2012))
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