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Black Friday: 10 Tips to Snagging a Great Deal!
tvpredictions.com ^ | 11/20/2011 | Phillip Swann

Posted on 11/21/2011 3:47:09 AM PST by Las Vegas Dave

Washington, D.C. (Nov. 20, 2011) -- Best Buy says it will sell a Sharp 42-inch, 1080p LCD HDTV for $199. Hhgregg says it will sell an Internet-enabled Samsung Blu-ray player for $39. And Target plans to sell a Westinghouse 46-inch 1080p LCD HDTV for $298.

These are just some of the incredible deals that retailers will offer on High-Definition TVs and related high-def products on Black Friday, the day after Thanksgiving (Nov. 25).

However, this could be the most competitive Black Friday ever -- thanks to the economy and smaller inventories at retail stores. It's quite possible that some of the discount prices will be available for one day only -- and may include restrictions on time and supply.

And with the economy in trouble, surveys indicate that bargain hunters will likely turn out in even greater numbers on the big day.

So, how can you make sure that you don't get shut out?

Based on information from Consumer World (http://consumerworld.org/pages/shoptips.htm) and other sources, TVPredictions.com has compiled a list of 10 rules for landing that great deal on Black Friday, the traditional start of the holiday shopping season.

And here they are:

1. Read the Ads -- In Print & Online Consumer World suggests that you carefully review your local newspapers on Thanksgiving Day. Usually, they will be stuffed with Black Friday ads and coupons. Bring them with you on the big day. Plus, many retailers are offering special Black Friday deals at their web sites. Don't forget to check them out 24-48 hours prior to the big day. (Also see Rule #6)

2. Evaluate the Deals Don't assume every "deal" is a deal. Compare the "Black Friday" special price with the HDTV's normal price before buying. You can do that at various e-commerce web sites such as Amazon.com and BestBuy.com. You may even find a lower price online.

3. Buy a Good Product A low price doesn't guarantee a high-quality television. Do some research and read product reviews at sites such as CNET.com. If you're not familiar with the product's brand name, check out its customer service record with organizations such as the Better Business Bureau.

4. Look For More Discounts Some stores issue coupons or rebates on high-def sets and other products such as High-Definition DVD players. Find out if the discounts apply to the Black Friday specials.

5. Come Early Some stores will offer special prices if you come in at a specific time, such as between 5 a.m. and 11 a.m. Check out those Thanksgiving ads for "time restricted" specials. Also, this year, some stores are holding pre-Black Friday sales.

6. Beat the Early Birds Some Black Friday deals at retail may be available at the store's web site. Check out the site in the wee hours of Friday morning and you might save yourself a trip to the store.

7. Check the Return Policy Before buying, find out the store's return policy. Consumer World says some stores discourage returns by imposing restocking fees or placing frequent "returners" on blacklists.

8. Get a Gift Receipt You can make a return easier for gift recipients by asking the store to place a receipt in a gift box. Without it, the store may not accept it.

9. Use the Right Credit Card Some credit cards offer free benefits such as a return protection guarantee or purchase points that can be redeemed for other products. When you're buying a big-ticket item like a HDTV, that could pay off.

10. Save More With Price Guarantees After buying the high-def set, keep your eye on the TV's price at other stores in the next month. Some stores will give you the difference between your price and a competitor's price during the holiday season.


TOPICS: Business/Economy; TV/Movies
KEYWORDS: blackfriday; blackfriday2011; hdtv; itsallgeek2me
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1 posted on 11/21/2011 3:47:10 AM PST by Las Vegas Dave
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To: ADemocratNoMore; advertising guy; aft_lizard; AJMaXx; Alice in Wonderland; american colleen; ...
Pinging the HDTV list..

HDTV PINGS! ~~~~~~~~~~~~~

Interested in the HDTV ping list?
Please Freepmail me(freepmail works best)if you would like your name added to the HDTV ping list,(approximately 375 freepers are currently on the HDTV ping list).
The pinged subjects can be HDTV technology, satellite, cable, and OTA HD reception (Over The Air with roof top or indoor antennas), Broadcast specials, Sports, Blu Ray/HDDVD, and any and all subjects relating to HDTV.

LVD

Note: if you search Freerepublic using the keyword "“HDTV”, you will find most of the past HDTV postings.

2 posted on 11/21/2011 3:50:06 AM PST by Las Vegas Dave (The DemocRATic party preys on the ignorant!)
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To: Las Vegas Dave

Yeh, but are any of them at least 120 Hz?


3 posted on 11/21/2011 3:55:56 AM PST by arderkrag (Georgia is God's Country. LOOKING FOR ROLEPLAYERS. Check Profile.)
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To: Las Vegas Dave

What a silly game.


4 posted on 11/21/2011 4:04:45 AM PST by Saundra Duffy ( For victory & freedom!!!)
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To: arderkrag

OK what is the difference between a 1080P and a 1080I..........my daughter said stay away from any 720 TV, it has to be at least 1080.....put I do not know why some have P’s and some have I’s after the number......also 60hz or 120 hz, what is the difference?


5 posted on 11/21/2011 4:04:54 AM PST by blueyon (The U. S. Constitution - read it and weep)
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To: arderkrag; All
The BB 42" Sharp special is 60hz.

Bagging a 42in Sharp, for $199 (if you are lucky) is a bargain!

The published specifications that I could find are limited: http://www.sharpusa.com/ForHome/HomeEntertainment/LCDTVs/LC42SV49U.aspx

http://www.product-reviews.net/2011/11/12/42-sharp-lc-42sv49u-lcd-1080p-hdtv-full-specs-a-mystery/

6 posted on 11/21/2011 4:18:36 AM PST by Las Vegas Dave (The DemocRATic party preys on the ignorant!)
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To: Las Vegas Dave; AdmSmith; AnonymousConservative; Berosus; bigheadfred; Bockscar; ColdOne; ...

Thanks Las Vegas Dave. And, wow--
Best Buy says it will sell a Sharp 42-inch, 1080p LCD HDTV for $199. Hhgregg says it will sell an Internet-enabled Samsung Blu-ray player for $39.

7 posted on 11/21/2011 4:25:06 AM PST by SunkenCiv (It's never a bad time to FReep this link -- https://secure.freerepublic.com/donate/)
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To: blueyon
1080P is full HD. 240hz is better than 120, which is better than 60.

You can get a good 1080p flat screen at 240hz for around a grand nowadays.

8 posted on 11/21/2011 4:31:26 AM PST by deadrock
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To: blueyon

Your daughter is not entirely correct, 720p is better than 1080i.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Z-JXfyvlPh0

http://www.highdefforum.com/showthread.php?p=180536#post180536

Here is a short description in order (see attached 6 min youtube):
1) 1080P
2) 720P
3) 1080i
4) 480p
5) 480i


9 posted on 11/21/2011 4:33:42 AM PST by Las Vegas Dave (The DemocRATic party preys on the ignorant!)
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To: blueyon

I = interlace (this is how traditional televisions have always worked)
picture is scanned zig-zag left to right from top to bottom 540 times across, then rescanned in between those “lines” 540 times again creating 1080 horizontal lines in 2 passes
P = progressive - this is better performance
1080 scans in one single continuous swipe
60, 120 240hz (hz = times per second) is the “refresh” frequency or how often the screen is scanned from top to bottom - higher is better


10 posted on 11/21/2011 4:37:09 AM PST by Optimist
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To: Optimist; DEADROCK; Las Vegas Dave; All

Thank you for the information...........


11 posted on 11/21/2011 4:40:00 AM PST by blueyon (The U. S. Constitution - read it and weep)
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To: Las Vegas Dave

Best way STAY HOME!!!!


12 posted on 11/21/2011 4:43:05 AM PST by slorunner
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To: arderkrag
Yeh, but are any of them at least 120 Hz?

That's the problem. The cheapest 120 Hz 40 to 42 inch LCD panels start at around US$550.

13 posted on 11/21/2011 4:43:32 AM PST by RayChuang88 (FairTax: America's economic cure)
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To: RayChuang88

Unless you are willing to camp out this week in front of a Best Buy store, I wouldn’t get to excited about this deal. Knowing BBY, they probably only have 3 or 4 per store


14 posted on 11/21/2011 4:50:32 AM PST by radioone ("2012 can't come soon enough")
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To: Las Vegas Dave; blueyon

correct 720P IS better than 1080i
because it is 720 distinct lines added to the screen in a single pass every 1/60th, 1/120th or 1/240th of a second (60, 120, 240 hz)
1080i equates to 540 since it takes 2 passes to get the entire picture
or to look at it another way it is equivalent to 1/2 the frequency = 30, 60 or 120 hz for a full picture
the lower the frequency the more likelihood of an apparent flicker and/or lag or “fuzziness” in the image as image content exceeds the sets ability to place it on the screen. In conventional televisions the residual “lag” in picture tube is what creates an appearance of all the lines being present to our eye. digital storage is doing basically the same thing on an i set. holding the image while the next “scan” occurs


15 posted on 11/21/2011 4:51:59 AM PST by Optimist
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To: radioone

You can bet they’ll have another option when those three or four are gone...and people will go for the bait and switch.


16 posted on 11/21/2011 4:58:32 AM PST by caww
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To: Las Vegas Dave

11) Celebrate the Orthodox Christmas(usually in early January and get great deals on Dec 26TH


17 posted on 11/21/2011 5:01:49 AM PST by Le Chien Rouge
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To: Le Chien Rouge

That’s what we used to always do............before we got old and no longer “wanted” anything..Small Christmas to keep the real reason on Christ...and then on Dec 26th we would go shopping and then celebrate by opening gifts under the tree Jan 1st..............

This year our daughter keeps saying we really should get a “big” TV as we would enjoy it. Hubby and I have a price in mind and if we can we will and if not, oh well..........it’s a win either way.


18 posted on 11/21/2011 5:13:39 AM PST by blueyon (The U. S. Constitution - read it and weep)
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To: radioone

ad states minimum of 10 per store. But if first 3-4 people in line buy 2 each for themselves and a friend, they’ll still be gone quickly. I usually stay away from BB on Black Friday and most other days too . . . unless it is a super deal and I don’t have to jump through too many hoops to get it.


19 posted on 11/21/2011 5:15:05 AM PST by Qwackertoo (New Day In America November 03, 2010)
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To: Las Vegas Dave
One of my students worked for the local Target store and laughed about these bargains. Yes, the store does have these bargain items at the price advertised, but in such limited quantities that only the first few customers in the door will be able to buy them. They often put these bargains at the back of the store so that you may buy other things on your way to the big ticket items.

Given the state of the economy when Black Friday sales fall short, retailers will be making further cuts to get inventory moving and after the holidays will still give you the best buy.

20 posted on 11/21/2011 5:24:43 AM PST by The Great RJ ("The problem with socialism is that pretty soon you run out of other people's money" M. Thatcher)
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To: Las Vegas Dave

go to Amazon.com- best place...

my wife and i are getting a “together” gift this year and i bought a brand new Samsung UN55D6000 55-Inch 1080p 120Hz LED HDTV (Black) for $1080 yesterday....


21 posted on 11/21/2011 5:27:00 AM PST by God luvs America (63.5million pay no federal income tax then vote demoKrat)
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To: God luvs America

Amazon also has many re-furbished sets too.

I almost always buy re-furbished for myself. Most of the major manufacturers - Sony, Apple, Samsung, etc. - have online re-furbished products.

I currently own a re-furbished Sharp Aquos Quattron 3D, re-furbished MacBook Pro and re-furbished Sony all-in-one PC.

All in all, you get a better quality product, and you know what you are getting because you have researched it.

I haven’t had any problems with any of the re-furbished products. They come with standard warranties, and you can buy additional warranty.

Last year I bought a Sony TV for my aunt for $600 on Black Friday. Found the same TV on Sony’s re-furbished site for $199 about a month later. The internet is your friend, and sure beats battling for a bargain.


22 posted on 11/21/2011 6:21:54 AM PST by A'elian' nation (Political correctness does not legislate tolerance; it only organizes hatred. Jacques Barzun)
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To: blueyon

A TV works by displaying a series of still pictures, fast enough that you can’t discern them - your brain fuses them together for an illusion of motion.

Each picture is made up of a set of horizontal lines.
720 means there are seven hundred twenty lines making up the picture.
1080 means there are one thousand eighty lines making up the picture.

The “p” means the screen will display all 1080 lines at once.
The “i” means every other line will be displayed at once, then the missing lines will be filled in next: 540 lines shown, then the other 540, letting your brain fuse them into one picture.
1080i is a cheap shortcut.

60Hz means the screen is redrawn sixty times per second.
120Hz means the screen is redrawn one hundred twenty times per second.
The faster the screen is redrawn, the smoother the apparent motion looks. Some people can discern the flicker between redraws at 60Hz; nobody can discern the redraws at 120Hz.

720p @ 60Hz will do, and you will probably not notice what’s missing. Some of us can tell the difference, and it bothers us; most people have no idea*.
1080p @ 120Hz will ensure there is nothing to miss.

(* - videophiles: remember that most viewers can’t even tell that a 640x480 image stretched to 1080p is “wrong”; they won’t recognize any benefit from a proper setup.)


23 posted on 11/21/2011 6:47:12 AM PST by ctdonath2 ($1 meals: http://abuckaplate.blogspot.com/)
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To: ctdonath2

Thank you


24 posted on 11/21/2011 6:51:23 AM PST by blueyon (The U. S. Constitution - read it and weep)
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To: Las Vegas Dave

I usually just wait for CyberMonday, order from home, have gas and hassle of the crowd.

Most of the Black Friday ‘good stuff’ is rationed with just a few to each store, so chances of getting that ‘grand bargain’ are not high.

Some of the Cyber-competition actually is going on during the entire week.


25 posted on 11/21/2011 6:52:30 AM PST by TomGuy
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To: A'elian' nation

i’ve bought refurbished products myself- no problem with them...for gifts though i’d rather get new products...


26 posted on 11/21/2011 7:38:05 AM PST by God luvs America (63.5million pay no federal income tax then vote demoKrat)
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To: TomGuy
I usually just wait for CyberMonday, order from home, have gas and hassle of the crowd.

In that case, it's probably best not to go out of the house...

27 posted on 11/21/2011 7:46:13 AM PST by RightFighter (It was all for nothing.)
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To: Las Vegas Dave

Black Friday 2011: 10 best TV deals

Nov 21, 2011 10:00 AM

With Black Friday now just days away, those of us looking to get a new HDTV for the holidays might be starting to narrow down the choices. We’ve seen a number of great deals being offered for the event, but we also believe that TV promotions will continue right through the new year, so don’t be discouraged if you miss out on a Black Friday special.

In fact, based on a recent analysis we did with the price-prediction website Decide.com, in a significant number of instances the lowest prices of the season were offered not on Black Friday or Cyber Monday but later in the year. Still, if you do intend to do some TV shopping on Black Friday this year, here are 10 deals that caught our attention:

1. Sharp 42-inch 1080p LCD TV (LC-42SV49U), $200 at Best Buy. Not surprising, given its shockingly low price, this is a doorbuster special from Best Buy, available in limited quantities at store locations. This is a fairly basic 1080p LCD set, though it does have four HDMI inputs. Sharp has been a somewhat inconsistent performer in our Ratings, but it’s still hard to beat a TV that’s priced like a microwave oven.

2. Westinghouse 46-inch 1080p LCD TV (VR-4625), $298 at Target. Westinghouse TVs have typically been among the lower-ranked sets in our Ratings, but this fairly basic model—a 60Hz set with a CCFL (fluorescent) backlight—might be just the ticket for budget-conscious shoppers looking for a TV for a secondary room of the house.

3. Vizio 47-inch 3D LCD TV (XVT3D474SV), $938 at Amazon. This 47-inch 3D TV from Vizio is loaded with features, including a full-array LED backlight with local dimming, the equivalent of 480Hz technology, built-in dual-band Wi-Fi, and Vizio’s VIA suite of Internet apps and services, including streaming movies and TV shows. The set is a passive-3D model and comes with four sets of lightweight polarized glasses.

4. Dynex 55-inch 1080 LCD TV (DX-55L150A11), $600 at Best Buy. This might be an appealing option for those looking for a larger set with a few extra features, such as 1080p resolution and 120Hz anti-blur technology. It has four HDMI inputs, which are also a plus. Dynex TVs have done well in our TV Ratings, generally offering very good overall performance at a fairly low price.

5. Samsung 51-inch 720p plasma (PN51D430), $498 at Walmart. This is a basic 720p plasma from a brand that has typically done well in the CR TV Ratings. It uses the company’s narrow-bezel “Plus One” design to squeeze an extra inch of screen. (Sears is selling this TV for just one dollar more as part of its early CyberMonday sale today.)

6. Zenith 50-inch 1080p plasma (Z50PV220), $500 at Sears. We’ve seen plasma TVs at this price, but seldom a 1080p model. For the past two years, Sears and Kmart have been rolling out low-priced Black Friday sets bearing the Zenith brand, and this year is no exception. It’s a basic 1080p plasma.

7. Panasonic 46-inch 720p plasma TV (TC-P46X3), $400 from Best Buy. Like Samsung’s, Panasonic plasmas typically do very well in our TV Ratings, and we purchased this set earlier this year for more than $600. Despite its lower resolution, it has a good number of features, including the ability to accept an optional Wi-Fi adapter and Panasonic’s EZ IPTV Internet platform, with access to streaming movies and TV shows.

8) Emerson 32-inch 720p LCD TV (LC320EM1-SF), $188 at Walmart. this is a very basic 720p LCD TV from Emerson, a brand controlled by Funai. It might be a good choice for those looking to outfit a spare bedroom or guest room with a basic, low-priced set. We’ve seen this set for close to $350 on various sites. Walmart will also have a 40-inch Emerson set for $248.

9. LG 47-inch 3D LCD TV and Blu-ray player bundle, $799 at Walmart. Walmart has created a 3D package consisting of LG’s 47LW5300 1080p 3D LCD TV, plus an unnamed 3D Blu-ray player and four sets of lightweight polarized glasses. The TV, which uses passive 3D technology, has a decent number of features, including an edge LED backlight and a 120Hz refresh rate, but it doesn’t include the company’s Smart TV Internet platform. If you’re looking to go bigger, both Amazon and Walmart have a similar bundle with LG’s 55-inch 55LW5300 3D set for just under $1,250.

10. Three big-screen specials at Best Buy and Walmart, $800 to $1,000. Here are three options for those looking for very big TVs:

•Sharp 60-inch 1080p LCD TV (LC60E79U), $800 Best Buy. A major-brand 120Hz set.

•Westinghouse 60-inch 1080p LCD TV VR-6025Z), $800 at Best Buy. Normally this 120Hz set is $1,000.

•Toshiba 65-inch 1080p LCD TV (65HT2U), $998 at Walmart. A 120Hz set that, based on our experience with the Toshiba TVs in our Ratings, would benefit greatly from an external sound system.

These are just some of the best deals we’ve seen offered for Black Friday, so let us know what’s on your radar this year. To make the most of these, and other, specials, make sure you read our blog with 12 tips for getting the best Black Friday deals. And remember that the cheapest TV doesn’t always mean it’s the best deal. Since you’ll likely own the set for a good number of years, make sure you one that really fits your needs


28 posted on 11/21/2011 8:39:07 AM PST by Las Vegas Dave (The DemocRATic party preys on the ignorant!)
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To: A'elian' nation

For some reason I suspect the “refurbs” are just overstock that the manufacturer doesn’t want toestablish a new lower price.

I have been in Frys Electronics and seen 50-100 of one item, all listed as refurbs. Seems to me that a helluva lot were sent back and refinished, especially when you open up the package and it looks brand new and not repackaged.


29 posted on 11/21/2011 10:13:33 AM PST by Oatka (This is the USA, assimilate or evaporate.)
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To: ADemocratNoMore; advertising guy; aft_lizard; AJMaXx; Alice in Wonderland; american colleen; ...

TV Specs That Aren’t Worth Paying For.
http://news.yahoo.com/video/us-15749625/27380258

Almost every year, TV manufacturers have touted some shiny new technology as the reason you need to buy a new set: flat screens, HDTV, plasmas, LCDs, 3D TV… but all of these are now old news. Practically the only trick stores have left is to reduce the price. This makes it an ideal year to get a great bargain, but only if you know what to look for — and what to avoid.

Plasma vs. LED vs. LCD
Not all HDTVs are created equal. If you’re getting a new set, the first factor to decide on is the type of TV that is best for you. Your main choices include:

*Plasma - Plasmas feature an older technology, but don’t completely count them out. They are cheaper, have deep blacks for rich contrast, and handle sports and fast motion well. But they are energy hogs, using three or four times as much electricity as Energy Star LEDs.
*Traditional LCD - Bright, with middle-of-the-road cost, traditional LCDs are prone to greyish blacks, and budget models can have blockier motion processing than other options.
*LED-backlit LCD - LED displays can be brighter and thinner than plasmas and LCDs. They are more energy conscious, and the top of the line models handle blacks as well as plasmas do.

Specs to Ignore (or at least not pay extra for)

Resolution
Resolution is the measure of how many pixels are on the screen. The higher the resolution, the higher definition you get. HDTVs (High Definition Televisions) are generally sold as either 720p or 1080p - which have 720 or 1080 rows of pixels. You might think having more pixels is better, and you’d be right — but only to a point. The real truth is that the human eye can barely discern the difference between 720p and 1080p except at a close distance on really big TVs. So paying extra for 1080p on a smaller set doesn’t make a lot of sense.

Internet connected TV
Sometimes known as smart TVs, Internet-connected TVs allow you to stream to your set all that the Web has to offer. While that’s a handy feature, you can always add on a device like the Roku for around $50-$70 or the Apple TV for about $100. Also most DVD players these days also have an Internet port or a way to get access to your home wifi network.

Refresh rate (or Hz)
Refresh rates determine how fast the TV repaints the image on the screen. 60Hz models refresh the screen 60 times per second; 120Hz models refresh the screen 120 times per second. It’s true that buying a TV with 120Hz refresh rate instead of 60Hz makes a noticeable difference when watching fast-moving programs like sports, where motion blur can become an issue at 60Hz.

But if you get tempted to buy a more expensive 240Hz model because you think it’ll make your TV viewing even better, think again. Many tech analysts agree that the naked eye can barely perceive the difference between 120Hz and 240Hz, making it unnecessary to pay extra for the latter.

Specs that Matter

Size
Buy as big as you can afford, but not too big for your room. THX came up with a useful guide that helps you determine optimal screen size based on the distance you’ll sit from the screen:
•32 inch class TV = 3.5-5 feet away
•42 inch class TV = 4-6 feet away
•50 inch class TV = 5-7.5 feet away
•60 inch class TV = 6-9 feet away

If a TV’s thickness matters to you, then you may want to take a closer look at LED TVs. Samsung’s LED9000 series measures a wafer-like 0.3” in depth; no traditional LCD or plasma TV is that thin. LED displays can be thinner than plasmas and CCFL-lit LCDs because some models are edge-lit, meaning the LEDs that illuminate the screen are only located on the edges.

Dimming
If you’ve narrowed your selection down to LEDs, consider getting a set with local dimming. LEDs without this feature can look blown out, with blacks that look more like greys. Local dimming turns down the brightness in areas that are supposed to be dark, dynamically improving the contrast. Note that edge-lit models with local dimming don’t perform as well as full-backlit units with local dimming capacity.

While LED with its local dimming feature, thinness, and minimal energy use may sound the ideal HDTV set, know that it can also be the most expensive option among the three. The 55” Samsung LED9000 model, for example, costs around $2,500 whereas some of Samsung’s 50” plasma TVs can be priced as low as $1,149.99.

Matte vs. Glossy
LCDs used to all have matte displays, which tend to fare better in parts of the house with an abundance of ambient light. Glossy displays have better contrast and sharper colors, but you may want to place them in darker places so your TV viewing won’t be ruined by glare from lights and windows reflecting on the screen.

What About 3D?

It’s a personal decision, but one that will cost you. According to the shopping site dealnews.com, a 3D TV will go for almost double the cost of a comparable 2D TV.

Active or passive 3D glasses?
If you do pony up for 3D, you’ll need to decide between systems that require active or passive glasses. Active shutter glasses can produce slightly better images, but are heavy, need recharging, and could cost a ton — yes, you need to pay extra for your 3D glasses on top of the TV itself. Some lower-end active glasses cost around $20, while higher-end ones are in the three figure price range. Passive 3D glasses are lighter and cheaper, but passive systems produce lower-quality images.

Glasses-free models
Manufacturers are working on 3D TVs that don’t require any kind of glasses, but they are hardly ready for prime time. Toshiba, for instance, has released a no glasses 3D TV, but it’s only available in Europe and Japan and costs a mind-blowing $10,000 for a 55” model — and it has viewing angle problems. Samsung says it won’t be able to mass produce glasses free models for quite some time.

Where’s the content?
While manufacturers would love for you to pay a premium for 3D systems, there’s not a lot of content available to watch. That may be changing, but right now producing 3D content is the lowest priority among TV executives.

The Bottom Line

The type of TV you choose should depend on your needs and the television’s placement in your home. If you don’t mind paying a premium, LED TVs offer the full package, and are also the most future-proof. Traditional LCDs and plasma TVs lag behind when it comes to features. But if you’re looking to get the largest HDTV your money can buy, either of them may be the better choice for you.


30 posted on 11/24/2011 11:07:45 AM PST by Las Vegas Dave (The DemocRATic party preys on the ignorant!)
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To: Las Vegas Dave
Bought a cheap eMachines Black EL1358G-51w Desktop PC with AMD Athlon II X2 Dual-Core 220 Processor, 3gigs of ram, 1TB Hard Drive and Windows 7 Home Premium at Walmart for $298 and a Nvidia card for $59 with a HDMI plug. Hooked that into the 47 inch Phillips LCD TV and enjoy all the web has to offer.

Streams Nextflix great as well as anything off of Ovguide and YouTube.


31 posted on 11/24/2011 11:17:24 AM PST by Dallas59 (President Robert Gibbs 2009-2011)
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To: All

This may work..

http://news.yahoo.com/blogs/upgrade-your-life/tv-specs-aren-t-worth-paying-225518304.html


32 posted on 11/24/2011 11:17:53 AM PST by Las Vegas Dave (The DemocRATic party preys on the ignorant!)
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To: TomGuy
I usually just wait for CyberMonday, order from home, have gas and hassle of the crowd.

Too much turkey?

33 posted on 11/24/2011 11:29:06 AM PST by Eaker (Nothing even remotely praising Romney should be posted because one should stick to the truth.)
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To: Las Vegas Dave

Nice summary. Thanks for the ping and Happy Thanksgiving!

PS: Did the Sharp Elite ever come out?


34 posted on 11/24/2011 11:31:39 AM PST by clintonh8r (Living well is no longer the best revenge. Revenge is now the best revenge.)
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To: blueyon

“OK what is the difference between a 1080P and a 1080I..........my daughter said stay away from any 720 TV, it has to be at least 1080.....put I do not know why some have P’s and some have I’s after the number......also 60hz or 120 hz, what is the difference?”

I replaced a 42” 720 LCD made about 2005, with a 42” 1080 LED last year.

The picture on the old set was much better, with supposedly inferior specs.


35 posted on 11/24/2011 11:43:37 AM PST by truth_seeker
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To: Las Vegas Dave
I don't know why people do this....I get these type deals every day though "Direct Buy"

Just bought a high end granite counter for the kitchen @ $29.00 sq ft installed. Saved about 40 % off MSRP off kitchen appliances and the money I saved off the cabinets alone paid for my membership twice over

36 posted on 11/24/2011 11:45:33 AM PST by Popman (Obama is God's curse upon the land....)
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To: clintonh8r

http://www.sharpusa.com/AboutSharp/NewsAndEvents/PressReleases/2011/August/2011_08_04_Elite_Press_Release.aspx

Looks like a great TV, and not exactly a budget priced BlackFriday door buster deal!
In the below link: “The 60-inch PRO-60X5FD will be available next week, with the 70-inch PRO-70X5FD coming out in late August.”
http://reviews.cnet.com/flat-panel-tvs/sharp-elite-pro-70x5fd/4505-6482_7-35004014.html#ixzz1eeZrBpwu

http://reviews.cnet.com/flat-panel-tvs/sharp-elite-pro-70x5fd/4505-6482_7-35004014.html

http://news.consumerreports.org/electronics/2011/08/sharp-revives-elite-tv-brand-pioneer-owners-sigh.html

http://news.cnet.com/8301-13506_3-20029882-17.html


37 posted on 11/24/2011 11:51:18 AM PST by Las Vegas Dave (The DemocRATic party preys on the ignorant!)
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To: Las Vegas Dave

Black Friday has become the statement that Americans are easily lead around by the nose.


38 posted on 11/24/2011 11:59:03 AM PST by CodeToad (Islam needs to be banned in the US and treated as a criminal enterprise.)
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To: Las Vegas Dave

Thanks for the post and all your work on this issue. Big help...


39 posted on 11/24/2011 1:41:47 PM PST by raybbr (People who still support Obama are either a Marxist or a moron.)
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To: Las Vegas Dave
Internet connected TV

I don't technically have one, but I do stream from the internet to the tv. I just bought an HDMI splitter and run one cable to the TV. I get a very good picture on my 40" Sony and don't have to worry about the viewing angle problems like my 24" monitor has.

40 posted on 11/24/2011 3:40:08 PM PST by I Drive Too Fast
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To: Las Vegas Dave

I hope to ditch my DLP this year for a plasma or LCD. I am tired of the almost yearly bulb replacement expense. Can anyone tell me if there are similar problems with LCDs and plasmas?


41 posted on 11/25/2011 9:09:22 AM PST by Sans-Culotte ( Pray for Obama- Psalm 109:8)
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To: Sans-Culotte

We got a Samsung 67” LED DLP. The huge size and cheap price (relative to LCD and/or plasma) made it the best deal, and the LEDs have a MUCH longer lifespan than the bulbs. Although that Sharp 80” LED LCD is looking pretty good.....


42 posted on 11/25/2011 9:11:42 AM PST by Future Snake Eater (Don't stop. Keep moving!)
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To: Las Vegas Dave

Thanks. I knew it would be expensive, but I have a Pioneer Pro Elite (my first ever HDTV) which I am totally happy with, and I need another big screen, so if this Sharp is the new equivalent of the Pioneer Elite I’ll consider it.


43 posted on 11/25/2011 9:18:55 AM PST by clintonh8r (Living well is no longer the best revenge. Revenge is now the best revenge.)
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To: Sans-Culotte

Below is from:
http://answers.yahoo.com/question/index?qid=20110307181504AAXqFaz
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

The panel is the bulb, and it can be replaced BUT it’s cheaper to purchase a new set..

Only DLP TV use “ BULB “ , New LED and laser DLP TVs and projectors eliminate the need for lamp replacement. (LED - DLP by Samsung and Laser DLP by Mitsubishi ).

LCD / LED ( LCD -LED BACK LIGHT ) life time from 40,000 to 60,000 hour even up to 100,000 hours from some very new models ( depends of models and maker / brand ).

http://lcdtvbuyingguide.com/lcdtv/lcdtv-lifetime.shtml

Plasma TV - old models before 2007 products less than 40,000 hours / new models after 2008 by Samsung / LG / Panasonic is 60,000 hours life time.


44 posted on 11/25/2011 9:51:21 AM PST by Las Vegas Dave (The DemocRATic party preys on the ignorant!)
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To: Sans-Culotte; All

http://lcdtvbuyingguide.com/lcdtv/lcdtv-lifetime.shtml

LCD/LED TV Lifespan:
How Long do LCD TVs Last?
By: S. D. Davis

Much has been made of the longevity of LCD TVs, at least compared to plasma TVs. The conventional wisdom is that LCD/LED televisions last longer than their plasma TV counterparts, which was true. The problem is, a lot of people extrapolate from this that either (a) LCD/LED TVs last forever or (b) LCD/LED TVs suffer no picture “wear” over time. Neither of these conclusions is correct.

Flat-panel LCD TVs have a lifespan newly approaching 100,000 hours on average. The lifespan of an LCD TV is generally longer than that of similar-sized plasma televisions. Some manufacturers even claim that their LCDs can last upwards of 100,000 hours when used continuously under controlled conditions (e.g., in a room with “standard” lighting conditions and 77° temperatures throughout). Just how realistic such claims are is debatable. After all, whose living room has no windows and remains at a perfectly comfortable 77 degrees year-round?

In any case, the pictures on fluorescent backlit LCD TVs will show some “wear” because they are generated by powerful lamps, which, like any lighting appliance, will dim over time and with use. The picture you see will dim ever so slightly as the backlighting bulbs dim. One other consideration is that CFL fluorescent backlighting will change colors over time. This will change the white balance on your TV and cause color calibrations to be thrown off. See our article about How to Calibrate your TV here.

Therefore, the most important thing to consider when it comes to the lifespan of your LCD TV is the actual lifespan of the light source in your LCD. LCD TVs last as long as their lightsources do. So, the lightsource in your LCD TV is the critical component of your LCD display unit. Newly introduced LED backlit LCD TVs will have the best long term performance. LED backlighting is superior in that the white balance of the TV will not be affected by changing bulb color over time. It’s a more consistent bulb technology and will also maintain its brightness longer.

The edge lit version of LED TVs will use far less energy while local dimming LED backlighting will be more accurate and present a better picture while using more power. We believe that local dimming LED backlighting will be slightly less stable from a life span standpoint.

To ensure the integrity of your lightsource for the duration of your LCD display’s lifespan, you will definitely want to adjust the CONTRAST setting of your LCD TV. Too high of a CONTRAST level will prematurely age your lightsource because it will have to work harder to maintain such light intensities. Your best bet is to keep your CONTRAST set appropriately for the conditions under which your view your LCD display. Brighter ambient light levels require slightly higher CONTRAST levels, while lower ambient light levels demand less CONTRAST.


45 posted on 11/25/2011 9:54:48 AM PST by Las Vegas Dave (The DemocRATic party preys on the ignorant!)
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To: Future Snake Eater; Las Vegas Dave
My DLP is. 62". I want to say at 60" at least. Besides changing the bulb, I have to remove the screen to clean the mirror, which gets covered in dust.

My only concern with LCDs is that in the stores, they look so blown out on the contrast that movies look like they're shot on videotape.

46 posted on 11/25/2011 10:32:47 AM PST by Sans-Culotte ( Pray for Obama- Psalm 109:8)
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To: Sans-Culotte
The TV’s you see in the stores are NOT calibrated and are meant to show a bright picture right out of the box to overcome the store's lighting..

I just use my eye for adjustment, but calibration instructions are available on the internet for free, or disks can be purchased for under $25 last time I checked.

47 posted on 11/25/2011 10:42:50 AM PST by Las Vegas Dave (The DemocRATic party preys on the ignorant!)
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To: Sans-Culotte

We got an LCD for our kids, and it looks good. Usually the store settings are garbage so as to contend with the florescent lights. Another setting to change is the refresh rate. The motion on our LCD was very strange looking for a while until I played with that setting, now it looks great. I’ve never taken the screen out of our DLP—sounds like fun! If I was forced to choose, I would say the LCD image does look better on LCD vs. the DLP, but that’s only if you’re willing to pay more for the technology. I wanted a huge screen without spending a fortune, so the DLP won the day. We wanted a smaller screen that would last for a while for our kids, so we got a good deal on an LG 42” LED LCD at Best Buy (I guess it was an older model). Both should last for many years before any bulbs have to be changed out.

I used to have a 61” Samsung DLP that used a regular bulb and color wheel, and we also had to replace it several times, plus the color wheel motor. The newer DLPs, as I said, use LEDs for the lamp and did away with the color wheel.


48 posted on 11/25/2011 2:39:49 PM PST by Future Snake Eater (Don't stop. Keep moving!)
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To: Future Snake Eater
Are they still big boxy TVs? Are they all made by Mitsubishi?

Our TV is a Mitsubishi DLP from around 2006. It is only 720p but is 62". I'm actually pleased with the picture; but the mirror cleaning is a must (what I do not like about big boxy TVs). I found a detailed illustrated guide on the AVS forum that explained how to do it. Takes about an hour.

49 posted on 11/25/2011 3:48:33 PM PST by Sans-Culotte ( Pray for Obama- Psalm 109:8)
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To: Sans-Culotte

I couldn’t tell you if Samsung actually makes it or if Mitsubishi does. It’s about 12” deep, whereas our older 720p Samsung was over 18” deep.

I looked at the 80” Mitsubishi very hard until I saw it was still a bulb/color wheel TV. My newer Samsung is far superior in that regard.


50 posted on 11/25/2011 4:58:09 PM PST by Future Snake Eater (Don't stop. Keep moving!)
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