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Maggots to Sex Abuse -- America's Nursing Home Scandal
Yahoo News ^ | Nov. 21st, 2011 | Sherry Tomfeld

Posted on 11/21/2011 5:27:15 PM PST by stillafreemind

In the maggot and sexual abuse stories, there was one common denominator. The aides/workers were not allowed to speak out about violations without losing their jobs. They were not allowed to talk about it or to contact the families. Nurses aides are the backbone of nursing home care. They know the patients better than anyone, but they cannot divulge heinous acts of neglect and abuse. To break this rule could mean the loss of their jobs. Silence or loss of job is a hard choice to make.

(Excerpt) Read more at news.yahoo.com ...


TOPICS: Chit/Chat; Health/Medicine; Miscellaneous; Society
KEYWORDS: abuse; elderly; healthcare; nursinghomes; obamacare; prolife
This is an issue that concerns me a lot. Abuse against the elders of this country seems to be on a constant rise.

This just makes me sick.

1 posted on 11/21/2011 5:27:17 PM PST by stillafreemind
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To: stillafreemind

nurses’ aids can always make anonymous complaints.


2 posted on 11/21/2011 5:44:09 PM PST by vladimir998 (Public school grads are often too dumb to realize they're dumb)
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To: stillafreemind

The children of the elderly bear responsibility for what happens to them, when they decide to dump them off at the nursing homes, without doing their due diligence.


3 posted on 11/21/2011 5:48:57 PM PST by dfwgator (I stand with Herman Cain.)
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To: stillafreemind

Just part of the Medicaid/Medicare Death panels. Can cut costs if the old folks just die off through selective neglect.


4 posted on 11/21/2011 5:50:09 PM PST by RetiredTexasVet (There's a pill for just about everything ... except stupid!)
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To: dfwgator

Many of the elderly in nursing homes are there at younger ages because they have no children. They didn’t value settling down and raising kids.
In the next seversl decades, the number of elderly who even have progeny will continue to drop drastically.

Compound this with those who never raised the children they did have. They cut out on their marriages, or shuffled the kids off to one daycare or little league or babysitter after another. Then they left them home alone to fend for themselves. Latchkey parenting earns a latchkey old age.


5 posted on 11/21/2011 5:59:26 PM PST by MrEdd (Heck? Geewhiz Cripes, thats the place where people who don't believe in Gosh think they aint going.)
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To: stillafreemind
“Does the problem lie in management, personal responsibility of nurses and aides, or no legal oversight?”

Legal oversight becomes more necessary when management and personal responsibility have failed. Establishing and maintaining a workforce (nurses, aides and everyone else)whose members feel personal responsibility is part of the job of management. Establishing and maintaining proper management is the job of the owner of the facility.

“Fines seem to be the standard way of handling nursing home infractions. Is it time to adapt new laws for these violations?”

It depends. If the problems are caused by a poor financial situation due to insufficient income, fines will only aggravate the situation. If the fines are considered to be just a cost of doing business, levying fines won't help that much. The problem here is coming up with new laws that would actually help instead of adding to the problems.

“They trust that the nursing staffs and administrators have the patients well-being in mind, not the facilities bottom line.”

The bottom line is important, and maintaining a decent bottom line is necessary, but maximizing the bottom line should not be the point of the effort. Most every endeavor has business aspects, but not every endeavor is a business foremost. I believe one of the problems with much of the medical profession is that it is run as a business, not as a profession.

6 posted on 11/21/2011 6:10:36 PM PST by KrisKrinkle (Blessed be those who know the depth and breadth of their ignorance. Cursed be those who don't.)
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To: vladimir998

Yes there are hotlines to report elder abuse


7 posted on 11/21/2011 6:13:39 PM PST by surroundedbyblue (Live the message of Fatima - pray & do penance!)
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To: MrEdd
Then they left them home alone to fend for themselves. Latchkey parenting earns a latchkey old age.

Indeed. This is what my parents did to us. My step-dad and my mother also used my father's Social Security death benefits for the 3 of us (my brother, my sister and me) to finance the expansion of their business in the early days. I'm 40 years old and I've been taking care of myself since I was 10 or 11. I can honestly say that my parents are probably the most selfish people that I know and this will be taken into consideration by me when they need help real soon. My sister is incapable of giving them what they need and my brother is deceased. I'm the only one that can help them, but for that, I have little desire.

Baby-Boomers: The 'Me' generation. You reap what you sow.
8 posted on 11/21/2011 6:17:52 PM PST by lmr
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To: MrEdd

Or many of them were SOBs to their family, and so the latter don’t feel obligated to do them any favors.

Based on all information I’ve gleaned, nursing home residents are mostly (over 70%) white women. There are far fewer men and non-white people.


9 posted on 11/21/2011 6:18:25 PM PST by Strk321
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To: stillafreemind

Several years ago our father was assigned to a skilled nursing home to recover from his heart attack. We were shocked that all the patients seemed to be drugged up. It was like a mental facility in the dining hall. The nursing facility, the hospital and the insurance company later claimed that the patients were *all* senile.

There shouldn’t be 100% senility in a skilled nursing home. We saw what kind of sedatives they were trying to give our dad. We were pretty sure that they were keeping the patients sedated so that they would be easier to care for while they were collecting money from the insurance companies.

We pulled our father out of there early the first night and took him home.

He recovered quickly at home, but said later he was scared for his life, that the nursing home was a “hell hole” and he wasn’t sure what would have happened if we had kept him there — they might have kept him there drugged up until he died in order to collect the insurance money.

Do your research on local nursing facilities early — on the Internet and in person — before you or a loved one is forced into one.

Does anyone know if there is extra insurance that people can buy that can be applied to upgrades in the quality of nursing homes when they are needed in the future?

.


10 posted on 11/21/2011 6:22:12 PM PST by bobk333
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To: lmr

We mentioned in another thread on here that elder suicide should be discouraged. In some cases though, maybe it’s not such a bad idea...


11 posted on 11/21/2011 6:22:45 PM PST by Strk321
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To: dfwgator

Generally, one reaps what was sown...


12 posted on 11/21/2011 6:28:16 PM PST by sarasmom
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To: MrEdd

There are millions of couples in this country who don’t have children because of infertility.

You should never speculate about the reasons for anyone’s childless situation — or talk uninformed nonsense about their ‘values.’


13 posted on 11/21/2011 6:32:46 PM PST by Blue Ink
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To: MrEdd

From the little I have seen, most of the people in the nursing homes seem like they have been good parents.

It is the kids who are neglecting their duties, whose lives are too busy with work and raising kids to bring the parents into their houses. It is almost always the grown off-spring who are fault. They can’t be bothered.

Most parents are good. They aren’t perfect, but almost all of them have done their very best.

I’m sorry that some people feel resentment that they were latch-key kids. How terrible that must have been to have parents working so hard that the kids had to let themselves into the house.

It is disappointing to see people finding faults with their parents and using even the slightest of faults from the past as excuses to subject their helpless parents to the living hell found in nursing homes.

.


14 posted on 11/21/2011 6:33:36 PM PST by bobk333
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To: sarasmom
Generally, one reaps what was sown...

I hope your own children don't treat you like you are treating your parents.

.

15 posted on 11/21/2011 6:35:37 PM PST by bobk333
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To: vladimir998
nurses’ aids can always make anonymous complaints.

Right on. My wife is a CNA in a nursing home and wouldn't feel the least bit frightened to do just this. If she lost her job, it wouldn't matter, as I make enough to support us and our 3 children. She is studying to be an LPN, anyway, so this is just a stepping stone. She is good person and would not be deterred from doing right by others, regardless of cost. Many CNAs are single women of the lower income bracket, she doesn't fit this profile, so she doesn't have nearly as much to lose.
16 posted on 11/21/2011 6:37:04 PM PST by lmr
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To: dfwgator

Interesting...as I was growing up, many of my friends had grandparents living with them...they had a room, or an apartment on the house. When did it become the norm to have parents go to nursing homes instead of live with their parents?


17 posted on 11/21/2011 6:39:10 PM PST by bushwon ("If you think healthcare is expensive now, wait till it is free"--PJ O'rourke)
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To: stillafreemind

So guess what will be the remedy, more regulation. I know of a case of regulation gone amok nearly endangering the lives of all the patients at a hospice. The owners were hit with a bounty hunter audit and the hospice had all of its payments frozen. The owner freaked and nearly had to lay off her entire staff. Just think of that, a bunch of dying patients spending their last days in beds soiled with urine and stool and without pain meds. Fortunately, they somehow made it through and the hospice was fined $500 for some egregious transgression I suppose.
But it seems that these old and sick people are just at the end of the ‘complete lives system’ curve and deserve to be liquidated according the compassionate progressives.


18 posted on 11/21/2011 6:39:24 PM PST by grumpygresh (Democrats delenda est; zero est un espece de merde.)
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To: bobk333
No most all of them have not done their very best.

Many did the least they could legally get away with.
Quite a lot did things that should have gotten them arrested, but their children loved them and would have denied everything at the time.

And those two incomes? Many were to buy luxuries for the parents, not necessities. You can ditch trying to find nobility in that. It isn't there. A new second and third car every two years or a boat or a house with three extra rooms isn't needed. Parents can buy those things and still not get braces to straiten their children's teeth or chip in for college.

But when they get to the nursing home those same people drone on about the sacrifices they imagine they made. And how they loved the children they don’t know and never visited after they fled the nest.

19 posted on 11/21/2011 6:45:43 PM PST by MrEdd (Heck? Geewhiz Cripes, thats the place where people who don't believe in Gosh think they aint going.)
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To: bobk333; sarasmom

If they do not, it will be because she treated them different. What goes around comes around, both ways.

Which was her point.


20 posted on 11/21/2011 6:49:03 PM PST by MrEdd (Heck? Geewhiz Cripes, thats the place where people who don't believe in Gosh think they aint going.)
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To: bobk333
There are policies you can buy, but there is no guaranty that the care provided, will be higher quality.

It's a kind of circular fraud scam, from what I have seen.

The children of an elderly homeowner talk to an “estate planner” and come up with the following estate planning scheme:
The assets the elder acquired and saved to pay for their own care in their old age is liquidated, several years before they need 24/7 care.
The “family” then declares the elder destitute, and applies on their behalf for “free nursing home care” via government programs originally meant for the poor and indigent.
This way,the family preserves “their” inheritance, and does not let the government cheat them out of their share of their parents savings.

That having been the pervasive legal scam of the last generation, I'm not shocked “they” are now surprised when they are old and infirm, and find themselves in substandard facility's.

Who did they think would be left to pay for their ponzi scheme?

21 posted on 11/21/2011 7:00:46 PM PST by sarasmom
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To: bushwon

In olden times, very few went to nursing homes, just the poor and those with no family. Of course people didn’t live as long either and so debilitating conditions like cancer and dementia were also pretty rare. Of course, you could also argue that placement in a home causes the person’s physical/mental condition to deteriorate quickly.

I can’t pinpoint an exact reason for it, but I have my theories such as a breakdown in the traditional family structure and also the fact that the population of the developed world in general is aging and there’s substantially more old people now than in past eras.


22 posted on 11/21/2011 7:28:18 PM PST by Strk321
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To: Strk321

The tax burden has also increased and forced women into the workforce.


23 posted on 11/21/2011 7:41:32 PM PST by Wage Slave (Army Mom!)
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To: Wage Slave
The tax burden has also increased and forced women into the workforce.

Good observation.

What effect, if any, has that had on men's desire to get married?

24 posted on 11/21/2011 8:27:24 PM PST by thecodont
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To: vladimir998

Yes.

And also, the more family is around, the harder it is for a place to get away with stuff like that.


25 posted on 11/21/2011 9:03:38 PM PST by Secret Agent Man (I'd like to tell you, but then I'd have to kill you.)
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To: stillafreemind
Some nursing homes are bad and some staff in good nursing homes can be bad apples. Most employees are there because they want to be there meaning they like working with the elderly. There is more money and less stress passing out burgers and fries plus you do not risk getting a disease the laws and rules do not allow you too know about like a patient has Syphylis {sp}.

I worked in nursing homes several of them not in direct patient care but maintenance. My wife was a CNA for 5 years before we met at work. Her patients were her babies, her grandmother, grandfather, she cared for. If she saw abuse she confronted the abuser and told her supervisor as well. She could have made better money in a clothing factory but liked her job wiping the poop up and all else that went with it.

There are more elderly in nursing homes for many reasons. When I was growing up {I'm in my mid 50's} elders often died of conditions that today people survive. People are living longer but with age many times comes serious medical issues. A patient today with treatable {treatable is not the same as curable many times} can live well over a decade with treatment but things like Chemo take a huge toll on the elderly. Dementia/Alzheimer's is another. It can hit in your 40's- your 100's. It hits when it hits. Yes for at least part of the disorder a secure facility is a wise move unless you have a mega family that can do 24/7 don't take your eyes off of them care. I've seen everything from cancer to patients in advanced STD and I don't mean AIDS.

I am also a caregiver of 26 years and I can speak from that point of view as well. I do nursing at home. I am my wife's caregiver including nurse. I learned it fast. Same wife BTW who was the CNA I now care for. She is a quad. I believe in family caring for family. I told my parents that for as long as I was able I would also be their caregiver.

Dad died at home last month. We did have hospice care but my mom in her late 70's myself, and another family member did the care actual. Hospice checked in a couple times a week. You have too so you can get the needed pain meds etc. Cancer is one bad bully. The last two weeks were emotionally hard the last three days of his life he could not swallow and was unresponsive.

I've seen a lot. I've nearly lost my wife several times just getting her to an ER in time. I did loose my first wife too a massive heart attack in her early 20's. This was different. This wasn't come visit an hour and go home then one day the home or hospital calls. This was being there with the person and it will be something that takes you time too deal with afterward when they pass. In the end you pray for GOD's mercy too take them. Think about this as it is what you face doing the care. I have no regrets but the caregiver has to understand the task and have the mental ability to cope for the patient {family members} sake and get the job done.

If a person thinks or feels they do not have the ability emotionally, physically, as well as being able to do care that even may bring them pain then yes a nursing home is a wise choice. I see no shame whatsoever in it. Do what you think is right for them and for you.

Used too be when people had a heart attack all the medical options they had was waiting on the next one and I remember that option was all my grandmother had when I was 6. I remember her oxygen tent in my aunts home.

Nursing Homes are supposed to have inspections and it's for a good reason. Good inspectors will not announce their arrival. As well most states dealing in Medicaid or Medicare do have an Inspector Generals office to answer too and usually an arm of that office inspects and investigates complaints etc as well. That is who you go too. An employee or family member can do it and not give their name.

BTW my wife caught her patients family member in abuse. The woman went into the patients room and poured cold water on her mother. Then she went too the nurse saying her mother was laying in urine and had been doing so for a long time because it was not warm. My wife had checked the patient about 10 minutes before when the family member was out of the room she was dry. So what busted the family member? Urine stains water doesn't.

Also there has been radical changes in the past decade in just what constitutes a nursing home. Assisted living facilities can often do what nursing homes did before. They can handle Dementia by locking the patient inside a secure unit. They are free to walk around etc but for their safety can not open the doors too leave the unit itself. They have a nurses and it is much more non clinical and relaxed for the patient. My sibling is in one. She gets better treatment there and is safer there for now.

Other assisted living where mental capacity is not a factor by physical capacity is the patients can come and go as they please anywhere themselves. The residence go there because they are fed, rooms cleaned, clothes washed, etc Family comes and goes as they please and for the resident it allows them something many cherish as long as they possibly can and that is retaining some of their independence. I have seen assisted living residents that a decade ago would have been stuck in a nursing home because they lacked ability too keep their home up because of issues such as being confined too a wheelchair.

Look at the reality of numbers also. Do the math. If a patient is lets say 80 how old are the patients kids? 62 maybe? Lots of difference in a 20-50 year old doing care giving than someone in their 60's being such full time. To beat it all I'm disabled myself. There may come a point we have to move to assisted living as well.

As for the race factoring in? Logical answer is many die younger from lack of early medical care or inherit diseases not normally hitting white patients. There is a difference in the life expectancy though I'm certain. But I knew plenty of black patients. Go look in a county ran NPO ran facility.

26 posted on 11/21/2011 9:25:21 PM PST by cva66snipe (Two Choices left for U.S. One Nation Under GOD or One Nation Under Judgment? Which one say ye?)
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To: cva66snipe

“There are more elderly in nursing homes for many reasons. When I was growing up {I’m in my mid 50’s} elders often died of conditions that today people survive. People are living longer but with age many times comes serious medical issues. A patient today with treatable {treatable is not the same as curable many times} can live well over a decade with treatment but things like Chemo take a huge toll on the elderly. Dementia/Alzheimer’s is another.”

Exactly. We’ve started to realize that perhaps today’s more advanced medicine isn’t such a good thing after all. Up to the 1970s or so, it was rare to see anyone live to 80+, especially men. And when you developed a health issue, it meant the speedy end of you. That’s perhaps why my grandfather did not seek heart surgery when he needed it. Because he decided it was his time. And so he went out still active and able-bodied, not a sad vegetable being wheeled around by an illegal immigrant nurse.

Albert Einstein died of an anyeurism after refusing surgery. He said “It is tasteless to keep life alive artificially. I’ve accomplished enough; it’s time to go now and I will do it elegantly.”

We have epidemics of cancer and dementia that didn’t exist in the past because of our futile attempts to extend a person’s life beyond the time when they should have gone.

“I’ve seen a lot. I’ve nearly lost my wife several times just getting her to an ER in time. I did loose my first wife too a massive heart attack in her early 20’s.”

She died of a heart attack in her 20s? Unbelievable. I’ve heard of women succumbing to strokes in middle age (my great grandmother for example), but not that young.

“In the end you pray for GOD’s mercy too take them”

Indeed. Sometimes you have an aged relative suffering in the worst way imaginable, and deep down, you want that blood clot or pneumonia to come and finally put them out of their misery.

“As for the race factoring in? Logical answer is many die younger from lack of early medical care or inherit diseases not normally hitting white patients. There is a difference in the life expectancy though I’m certain. But I knew plenty of black patients. Go look in a county ran NPO ran facility.”

The average lifespan for black men is 69 and 76 for black women (whites are 76 and 80, respectively).

Myself, I wouldn’t want to live longer than 70. If I died in my sleep of a heart attack at like 65 or something, I’m fine with that. Living to an advanced age just isn’t worth it from my POV.


27 posted on 11/22/2011 2:54:33 PM PST by Strk321
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To: Strk321
I've watched a movie both my dad and I liked many times called "Wind Walker". It was basically about an elder Indian trying to die and the calamity that came with it. He was ready his body wasn't. One of his sayings was "Grandfather it is not healthy too live to be such an old age." LOL

My dad was diagnosed with prostate caner in his early 70's and for 9 years of it was treatable even without chemo therapy. The doctors had basically told him he would outlive the cancer because the odds were another disorder or condition would kill him before that happened. But other than the cancer he was much healthier than they thought and at the end the chemo stopped working and the cancer spread rapidly at the end even likely too the brain. It not only stopped working it eventually robbed him of his cognitive abilities as well. A younger person might have shaken that aspect off but by then he was in his 80's.

Don't get me wrong the doctors were great and we hold no ill whatsoever for them doing what they believed was right. They looked at saving life as in most cases a doctor should. The doctors really thought he'd outlive the cancer and likely a less horrid ailment take him and I can understand that.

I'm against euthanasia for ethical and moral reasons. In todays moral standards {rather extreme lack thereof} it would be like Hitlers Holocaust but this time in the name of corporate cost savings with governments approval and encouragement even mandating such. At the same time though I can support a persons individual decision to let nature takes it's due course and let medical science provide all them all comfort possible if requested. That was my dads final choice he stopped the treatments.

My personal religious belief is that GOD for His reasons lessened mans life span. That is in The Bible as well. My dad told me months earlier he didn't fear death and he was ready both mentally and spiritually that made it easier. I already knew from my early childhood he was ready spiritually because he taught me there is Christ and there is salvation.

Solomon would have problems sorting through some of the health issues today. Like it says in the song The Gambler about how you leave this world "The best that you can hope for is too die in your sleep." And like the preacher said at dads funeral we all have that appointment too face our death.

28 posted on 11/22/2011 5:02:27 PM PST by cva66snipe (Two Choices left for U.S. One Nation Under GOD or One Nation Under Judgment? Which one say ye?)
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To: cva66snipe

My opinion is that only a relatively small number of people actually have the genetic ability to live to advanced age and the rest are just being kept alive artificially. Michaelangelo lived to 88 at a time when most people didn’t reach 70. So we can conclude he must have had very good genes to be able to live that long without any of today’s medicine.

“I’m against euthanasia for ethical and moral reasons. In todays moral standards {rather extreme lack thereof} it would be like Hitlers Holocaust but this time in the name of corporate cost savings with governments approval and encouragement even mandating such. At the same time though I can support a persons individual decision to let nature takes it’s due course and let medical science provide all them all comfort possible if requested. That was my dads final choice he stopped the treatments.”

I agree fully about that. To give another example Eppie Lederer (Ann Landers) was perfectly healthy up to the age of 83 when she developed bone cancer. She decided it was time to go, refused any treatment and died a few months later. My opinion is that you can do whatever you want with yourself, but be forewarned that trying to cheat death for as long can leave you a nursing home vegetable.

“My personal religious belief is that GOD for His reasons lessened mans life span. That is in The Bible as well. My dad told me months earlier he didn’t fear death and he was ready both mentally and spiritually that made it easier.”

It’s because of the decline of religious belief in society that we can’t accept our relatives’ death. When you think there’s no afterlife, it’s a lot harder to deal with this.


29 posted on 11/22/2011 5:22:39 PM PST by Strk321
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To: Strk321
We mentioned in another thread on here that elder suicide should be discouraged. In some cases though, maybe it’s not such a bad idea...

Life could have been different for everyone involved. Perhaps my generation is 'coddling' their kids too much due to the regretful neglect and exploitation that we received at the hands of the previous generation. We don't want ours to 'suffer' like we did. Are we really helping them, though? That is my question. I hope so, but spoiling the kids doesn't work either. Dysfunction is generational, albeit for different reasons and neither the former or the latter breeds personal or social responsibility.
30 posted on 11/22/2011 11:03:04 PM PST by lmr
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To: bobk333
It is the kids who are neglecting their duties

I'm not one to be so totally vindictive as to blame one generation or the other, but I happen to think parents are ultimately responsible for at least the short-term outcome of their adult children's lives and how that affects the latter outcome of their own. Parents are more than likely responsible for the attitude of their children by the time those children are 18-25, in my estimation. Following that age range, there are too many potential outcomes that fail to not implicate the children in some sort of parental neglect if your premise is true.

However, what I've seen for the most part is people attempting to confirm their own bias one way or the other. No one is objective, because everyone is selfish, right? In my own example, my parents (Step-Dad and Mother) used my own father's death benefits for the 3 of us to finance the early expansion of their business while they left us home alone. I remember my parents sending my sister off to a relative while leaving me and my brother home alone for a week when we were 12 and 13 years old for 2 years in a row, (age respective to each year, I was 14 the 2nd year, my brother was 13) I also remember my parents going out late at night and keeping us at home to fend for ourselves at an even earlier age than that (9 to 11, in fact) till about 4 in the morning or even later on a score of occasions, too many to count, in fact. When I was 9 or 10, I used to worry so much about my mother being out so late, I feared she was dead. There was no adult at home with us at the time, not even a babysitter older than us. Do you have any idea the kind of scars that are created in that scenario? I don't think you do. And, in spite of my worry for her, she could care less for my feelings at the time. This is only the tip of the iceberg in a long line of neglect/abuse. I'm amazed I turned out as well as I have. My sister is basket case and my brother is dead (he killed himself with drugs)

In my opinion, they deserve nothing. What they get from an actual human being (myself) will be far more than what they deserve. Not because I love them, but because no one else will or can help them.

Every situation is different, but sometimes I think people just don't really get it. The parents are usually the problem, not their children.
31 posted on 11/22/2011 11:34:40 PM PST by lmr
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To: lmr

The WWII generation coddled their children to a high degree because they’d spent their youth in the Depression and a war where they had nothing. Boomers consequentially became spoiled and lazier than their parents, and in turn made _their_ children even softer.

Of course the WWII gen, a lot of them became selfish pricks in their old age. My grandmother and great aunt were just the type who were completely convinced that their generation had all the answers and that their children couldn’t possibly ever be responsible adults. They were (incidentally) the first generation in which the majority of them lived to be old (since lifespans were shorter in past times), and the first time in history that senior citizens were a politically and economically important demographic. Up to that time, the population of seniors was not only small, but disorganized, poor, and distrustful of government. The net effect of Social Security was also a wholesale redistribution of wealth from younger people to old ones.

That generation tended to have a very high degree of faith in government and science to solve all of mankind’s problems, while Boomers became the exact opposite. They thusly rebelled against the plastic corporate gray flannel suit 50s and 60s America that their parents presided over. So when the 70s came, there was a deep-seated mistrust of the establishment and suddenly everyone gets into all this hippie stuff about natural healing, nutrition, Eastern religions, etc. And later on, the evangelical Christian movement emerged as a backlash against the sexual revolution.

Remeber: it was mostly Boomers and Silent Gens (who tended to be Republican-oriented) that put Reagan in office, not the Democrat New Dealers.


32 posted on 11/23/2011 2:12:52 AM PST by Strk321
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