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Quitting Smoking - update and reassurance needed
self ^ | 12/4/11 | self

Posted on 12/04/2011 7:22:02 AM PST by Marie

A couple of months ago I posted a thread that I was trying to quit smoking and asked for advice.

I tried going cold turkey, but only managed a few days. I finally went to the doctor and got a prescription for Chantix.

I'm right at three weeks smoke-free now. I quit taking the Chantix about a week and a half ago (horrible nightmares and seriously screwed up sleep) and I'm past the 'cravings' stage. I really only think about smoking a couple of times a day, but I'm not fighting the urge to smoke any more.

This is the point where I usually fail. Week three.

Since I quit, I've been dealing with a constant, low-level anxiety. It's like a panic attack that won't stop. I'm very sensitive to noise and even mild stress pushes me into a horrible place.

This is not 'craving'. This feels like the worst, never-ending, PMS attack ever.

I've been through this before and, as I said, this is when I fall. I start to think that this is how I'm going to feel forever. That I'm never going to feel normal again.

In the past, I've given up and started smoking, not because I wanted a cigarette, but because I knew that this horrible anxiety would go away as soon as I had a cigarette. I actually have made the choice to smoke rather than be crazy.

I need to know that this does eventually end. That I'll one day feel normal again. That I'll be able to concentrate and think and not feel like I'm having a panic attack. That this is part of the process and that it does get better.


TOPICS: Chit/Chat
KEYWORDS: cigarettes; quitting; smoking
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1 posted on 12/04/2011 7:22:09 AM PST by Marie
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To: Marie

Quitting smoking is easy! I’ve done it many times.~Mark Twain

I wish I knew what to tell you, I have also tried to quit and it’s a tough row to hoe.


2 posted on 12/04/2011 7:26:07 AM PST by autumnraine (America how long will you be so deaf and dumb to the tumbril wheels carrying you to the guillotine?)
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To: Marie

Oh yeah, those little dum dum suckers are good. They occupy the hand to mouth habit.


3 posted on 12/04/2011 7:26:57 AM PST by autumnraine (America how long will you be so deaf and dumb to the tumbril wheels carrying you to the guillotine?)
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To: Marie

Are you on nicorette?

Also go to your doctor, explain the situation and ask if you can get on some Buspar for a while. It’s an anti-anxiety med.


4 posted on 12/04/2011 7:27:42 AM PST by netmilsmom (Happiness is a choice)
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To: Marie

Why not try an eCig?


5 posted on 12/04/2011 7:27:42 AM PST by mnehring
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To: Marie

It took me several attempts before I was able to quit for good. I quit by using Committ Lozenges -but I got hooked on them too (and had to have some major dental work done) but nothing as bad as what smoking was doing to me.

Prayers!


6 posted on 12/04/2011 7:28:25 AM PST by justsaynomore (It's not over.)
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To: Marie

Good for you, Marie. It almost sounds like your brain is re-adjusting itself to being nicotine free. Is there anything you can do to calm yourself during the anxiety issues like soaking in a tub, taking a walk... something that usually calms you down?


7 posted on 12/04/2011 7:29:02 AM PST by momtothree
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To: Marie

I quit cold turkey in March of 1986.
I kept it a secret from friends and co-workers until I was three months in. Then someone noticed I wasn’t smoking and this was quite a boost.
I think it was five years before I quit reaching for a pack in my shirt pocket.


8 posted on 12/04/2011 7:30:38 AM PST by Eric in the Ozarks
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To: Marie

Did you wean yourself off the Chantix? If not that can be the problem. Chantix stopped me from smoking in two weeks also. Now I need something like Snacktix.


9 posted on 12/04/2011 7:31:03 AM PST by DainBramage
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To: Marie

regular excercise, even if its just a fast walk can help. plus chocolate.


10 posted on 12/04/2011 7:32:15 AM PST by beebuster2000
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To: Marie

I quit Chantix, too. It altered my awareness to the extent I used no judgement at all and walked up behind one of my horses who was asserting her dominance over another horse. I know better than to do this....but wasn’t even thinking. I got kicked in the face from one of her rear legs as she was being emphatic in her message to the other horse. My injury was only superficial, fortunately.

This particular horse is a loving, gentle horse and has never, in 20 years, ever kicked a human. I never took another Chantix...this was maybe 10 days, 2 wks into the medication.


11 posted on 12/04/2011 7:33:39 AM PST by Dudoight
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To: Marie

It took me 3 tries but I finally kicked it. In 6 mos you will be so happy that you don’t smoke anymore. My secret crutch was a roll of Sweet Tarts in every room. Just sit down to watch a little TV and make sure you have the Sweet Tarts there to take the place of smoking. Worked like a charm.


12 posted on 12/04/2011 7:34:22 AM PST by Georgia Girl 2 (The only purpose of a pistol is to fight your way back to the rifle you should never have dropped.)
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To: Marie

I quit smoking 4 years ago after many attempts using patches to ease the withdrawal.

When you start to feel the need for a cig, think of resisting as your body healing.

Eventually, I came to regard smoking as a deadly temptation. I know that if I have one cigarette, I would smoke two packs by midnight. So I avoid smoking anything.


13 posted on 12/04/2011 7:35:00 AM PST by y6162
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To: Marie

Hang in there dear FReeper! I did it cold turkey 15 years ago. Look how far you’ve come going from being consumed by it to now only having a couple of fits a day. It’s how you handle the couple of times a day the urge hits that matters now.

I had to train my brain by literally telling myself NO!, NOT GONNA HAPPEN every time I had a fit in the later stages.

You can do it.


14 posted on 12/04/2011 7:35:41 AM PST by Rebelbase
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To: Marie

I quit for good in 1990,after going to the doctor during a particularly bad chest cold (coughing spells almost to the point of passing out).The doc told me,”You have chronic bronchitis,which will develop into COPD,which will kill you if you don’t quit.” I broke down crying and asked him to help me.He wrote me a prescription for Nicorette gum(not OTC at that time,and $99 for a box of 100 chiclets) and after 3 weeks I traded an addiction to cigarettes for an addiction to sugarless gum. Cheaper,tastier and guilt-free.Find a gum flavor & stick to it.During the times you normally smoke (after meals etc.),pop a couple of sticks of gum in your mouth instead. Sounds crazy but it works. Chantix is some pretty severe stuff....have you tried the patches? Some people swear by them.


15 posted on 12/04/2011 7:37:37 AM PST by gimme1ibertee ("Criticism......brings attention to an unhealthy state of things"-Winston Churchill)
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To: Marie; netmilsmom
I agree with netmismom. Go to you doctor and request a script for anxiety. 13 months ago my doctor put me on the patch along with bupropion. Smoked 3 cigarettes after I started the patch and pill and haven't taken one puff since.

Freedom, healthy outlook and $5.00 a day, everyday, to spend as I please.

16 posted on 12/04/2011 7:37:48 AM PST by patriotUSA (Thank you Jesus.)
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To: Marie
Since I quit, I've been dealing with a constant, low-level anxiety.

For some reason, nicotine always seemed to improve my thinking focus. During withdrawl in the first few months, I could not rely upon my thinking, insight nor intuition. I started chewing Nicorette and it really helped.

After 3 months or so, I scheduled a nice vacation on a nice, warm beach where I didn't have to make too many choices and was nicely distracted by the bikinis on the beach (not much thinking going on there).

Good luck to you. Stay off the sugar foods too.

17 posted on 12/04/2011 7:37:59 AM PST by Zuben Elgenubi
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To: Marie

It took months of prep for me but I did it. Here’s how. I naturally wake up every night at 3am or so for about an hour. While awake, I imagined what my lungs looked like. What the smoke did when I inhaled. What it would be like to suffer cancer, stroke, heart attack. What my family would do without me. Take all of your imagination and get as horrible an image of these issues as possible. You’ll quit. In Feb 1988 I went to a stop smoking clinic. This is how they do it except with film footage and actual pics. In 1993 I started smoking again. In 2007 I quit using the negative techinique I described. It works but I’ll never totally get rid of the urge.


18 posted on 12/04/2011 7:38:13 AM PST by albie
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To: Marie

A fellow at work, quit almost 6 months ago and replaced cigs with those chewable nicotine pills. He still eats them like candy. I tried almost everything and eventually did do it cold turkey. Every time I failed it was for the reasons you cited, but the psych stuff did eventually go away. I can’t remember how long though.

You can do it, you’re just not sure you can.


19 posted on 12/04/2011 7:38:28 AM PST by umgud
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To: Marie
You can do it. I am 2 years in now....I thought I could never, ever quit. What helped me? Getting and staying busy...all the time. Finding something to do...the cravings will go away...the more time you put between your last smoke the better you will feel. Anxiety? Sure, cigs are filled with addictive additives that create many things..including anxiety....it'll pass. You are awesome!
20 posted on 12/04/2011 7:39:00 AM PST by maineman (BC EAGLES FAN)
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To: Marie
My wife is cigarette free for three months now, using e-cigs.

They come in different nicotine strenghts and you can slowly decrease the levels to zero. You get only the nicotine - which does have some redeeming values, but not the 700 odd combustion chemicals that are the main contributors to lung disease.

Each e-cig is about a pack and a half of regular cigarettes, so you wind up at about $2.50 a pack, average.

There is no odor, no fire, no ashes, and yet you still get to do the "habit" things involved in handling the "cigarette", yet only exhale odorless water vapor.

It's a lot less trouble than smoking a real cigarette, you can even smoke in bed with no danger. The "fire" in the e-cig is an LED that glows orange when you inhale.

She has tried everything from patches, to pills, to cold turkey, and we feared she was hopelessly hooked (after 30 years of smoking) but the e-cigs did it.

They also come in zero nicotine, and flavors, like chocolate, cherry, and methol.

I'd like for her to quit those too, but even if she doesn't, it's a 1,000 times better than real cigarettes.
21 posted on 12/04/2011 7:40:01 AM PST by FrankR (What you resist...PERSISTS!)
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To: netmilsmom; Marie

I’ll second the suggestion to talk to your doc again. Also, is there a local smokers anonymous group that you could contact for suggestions? A friend/loved one you can call when things get bad? If you’re a person of faith, how about your pastor/minister/priest? Another idea, if you have the time and inclination, how about volunteering if you don’t already? Or a time and brain consuming hobby? Might be time to learn a new skill. Do you work out? If not, talk to your doc about an exercise program. In the meantime, Marie, we will continue to keep you in our prayers.


22 posted on 12/04/2011 7:40:15 AM PST by mewzilla (Santelli 2012)
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To: Marie
I chewed tobacco for 30 years. Tried many times to quit. One day I sat down and figured out how much money it was costing me ($60 every 10 days). Then I figured out what I could buy with that money and guess what? It became a no brainer. Haven't had a chew in 2 years.
23 posted on 12/04/2011 7:40:34 AM PST by deweyfrank
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To: Marie
This is the point where I usually fail. Week three.
Interesting - I quit smoking in 1981 and I remember wanting a cigarette at three weeks and again at three months.
How did I quit? First, you have to know that you really want to quit. I tried many times, but knew I really didn't want to (you can't fool yourself).
On the weekend I decided to quit, I had 5 cigarettes left in my pack and I said I'd make them last for a week.
Then I only lit up at critical times - after a cup of coffee, with a beer, etc. But each time I put out the cigarette after just a few drags.
The following weekend I had one butt left and I tossed it.
One other factor - smoking is an addiction, but it also includes the hand to mouth habit. I used tooth picks ... when I felt like a cigarette, I'd just reach for a toothpick. Some use Life Savers.
It wasn't easy, and you can do it too if you really want to. Think of the money you'll save.
24 posted on 12/04/2011 7:40:54 AM PST by oh8eleven (RVN '67-'68)
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To: Marie

Hang in there!!!! I quit 2 months ago and know what you are talking about. Nicotine addiction is very powerful. Some people can beat it with minimal side effects. People like you and I get what I call “the crazies”.

Look ... you know why its happening. Just laugh it off. You are not going to die. People that know you are quitting can shrug off your anxiousness ... you’ll be sane again shortly :-). Just enjoy “the crazies” for a while. They will pass.

For the love of God though .... DO NOT FIRE UP A CIGARETTE!!!! You already got through the substantially difficult part!!!! This part is the hard part. Just give it a bit more time and you’re going to feel a heck of a lot more normal. Nicotine rewires the reward center of your brain for the most part. It takes time to undo that!!!

Just let the episodes pass and keep it in your mind that you’re not dying. If you have a panic attack ... so what. Yes, they’re horrible. However, side effects of smoking for a lot of people are substantially worse than a panic attack.

Also, take solace in the fact that, even though you feel crazy, this small mental disorder you are experiencing is NOTHING compared to “liberalism” ... look at it as an opportunity to catch a glance into the mind of the enemy :-).

Again, you’re going to be fine. This is very, very, very temporary.


25 posted on 12/04/2011 7:41:20 AM PST by edh (I need a better tagline)
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To: Marie
I smoked for 30 and finally quit about 4 years ago...maybe 5.

Anyway, get on a mild anti depressant. It will help and then you can get off of it when things calm down.

Also, I used the patch and my doctor told me to use it longer than called for. That helped as well.

Good luck!

26 posted on 12/04/2011 7:41:33 AM PST by CAluvdubya
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To: Marie

Trust me when I tell you this: Every single time you wait through the craving, they will come farther and farther apart. When you first quit, the cravings are every five minutes. Every time you let it pass, the next one comes farther away.

You WILL get to the place where the urge to smoke will be weeks and then months apart. Probably not ever years apart because at that point you will be way past it.


27 posted on 12/04/2011 7:46:27 AM PST by spacejunkie01
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To: autumnraine

You could take anything in my life away from me, but you TOUCH my
cigarettes and I go postal!!!! GOOD LUCK TO YOU!!!!! My 84 year old
mother still smokes to her hearts content!!!!!


28 posted on 12/04/2011 7:46:33 AM PST by Kit cat (OBummer must go)
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To: autumnraine

You could take anything in my life away from me, but you TOUCH my
cigarettes and I go postal!!!! GOOD LUCK TO YOU!!!!! My 84 year old
mother still smokes to her hearts content!!!!!


29 posted on 12/04/2011 7:46:48 AM PST by Kit cat (OBummer must go)
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To: Marie

Did it the same way had some of the sames experiences - about 1 year ago and I smoked for a long time, It gets better you just need to stay strong and not give in - I would grag a dum dum sucker or get up and walk for 5 to 10 minutes when I felt overwhelmed. Good luck - it gets easier and you will start feeling better and better. A good consistent exercise program helps a lot.


30 posted on 12/04/2011 7:48:51 AM PST by KSCITYBOY
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To: Marie
Hang in there - if you manage to get a few months under your belt, you will indeed feel "normal" again. It's very addictive and the mental/emotional cravings are the hardest to shake becaue the physical cravings are usually gone within a week. Soon you will discover that your bowels will move and your car will start even without a lit cigarette being in the mix.

The important thing is to not stop quitting, even if a relapse occurs - long-term determination will pay big benefits in the end.

I have offered up a prayer that you are successful - the Chantix is probably causing the inner unease because it has many mental/emotional side-effects - keep that knowledge forefront so you understand that it's the drug and not something else going wrong.

31 posted on 12/04/2011 7:49:11 AM PST by trebb ("If a man will not work, he should not eat" From 2 Thes 3)
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To: Marie

I never smoked but got addicted to nicotine gum. Love nicotine! Chain chewed for years. Switched to patches for a while and am now, finally, nicotine-free. It’s been two weeks. I still miss the gum. I deeply mourn the loss.

This little toothpick thingy helps. I keep them all over the house and in the car. Makes me happy to pick my teeth and the activity is GOOD for you! Healthy gums prevent heart disease, arthritis, diabetes and toothlessness.

https://www.perio-aid.net/perio-aid.html

Good luck!


32 posted on 12/04/2011 7:50:17 AM PST by fullchroma
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To: Marie

Look freepmail — basically do not be afraid to get other appropriate physicians involved if needed for your peace of mind and/or physical health, and watch the caffeinated beverages or stimulant supplements in the meantime.


33 posted on 12/04/2011 7:51:32 AM PST by HiTech RedNeck (Sometimes progressives find their scripture in the penumbra of sacred bathroom stall writings (Tzar))
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To: Marie
BTW,Marie....prayer definitely works,not just to overcome a huge,ugly habit,but for life's other ills as well.I got a little booklet in my box of Nicorette that outlines some things that help with staying smoke-free.To this day I carry it in my purse.I don't get it out and look at it any more,but just knowing it's there is an odd sort of comfort to me. True story....I remember when I came home from the doctor's,after getting the Nicorette,I was so mad at myself and at that cigarette case I carried around,that I threw it across the living room and it fell behind the recliner sitting in the corner.
You know,that case stayed on the floor behind that chair for a good three months before I got up the nerve to retrieve it,handle it like a dead mouse and toss it into the trash.It's a very,very strong addiction,but like so many others,unless you handle it,it handles you.
You're wrestling it right now,almost in a chokehold,got it down,now hang on till it's choked dead.DON'T give up.You are at a critical point and you can get past this stage and move forward. Whenever I think about cigarettes, I just stand up,take a slow,full,deep breath and let it out.I couldn't do that when I smoked because the thick brown mucus in my lungs would rattle and tickle till I coughed uncontrollably. About two months after quitting I could do it and it felt so cleansing!! I've read that it takes a little over a year for your respiratory system to recover when you stop.That sounded about right for me. I was up to 1 1/2 packs a day when I quit. Now i'm a pack of gum a week girl.:)
34 posted on 12/04/2011 7:53:09 AM PST by gimme1ibertee ("Criticism......brings attention to an unhealthy state of things"-Winston Churchill)
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To: Kit cat

Is that really a nice thing to post on this thread? Not helpful to the freeper asking for advice


35 posted on 12/04/2011 7:53:43 AM PST by WhyisaTexasgirlinPA (Congress touched me inappropriately, they should be put on administrative leave immediately)
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To: Marie

I believe I responded to your last post that I had quit smoking cold turkey after fifty years as I wasn’t about to pay for the Dems new insurance program with my tax money should I keep smoking.

I made up my mind to not light up basically, and that’s what I didn’t do. Never lit up another cigarette.

It is also important to know that I spend all my time here at the ranch. I don’t go anywhere except say the supply store, Home Depot for materials, Grocery store....other than that I don’t have anyplace where I would sit and socialize with others that might be smoking, or somebody is around me that is. I do go to the local doughnut shop, but nobody smokes there either.

It helps to avoid those places where some folks are inclined to light ‘em up, and keep your self busy with handi-work. Occupy yourself with something of interest that will benefit you, and keep your hands busy as well keep your mind off of your anxieties.


36 posted on 12/04/2011 7:54:51 AM PST by rockinqsranch (Dems, Libs, Socialists, call 'em what you will, they ALL have fairies livin' in their trees.)
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To: Marie

I believe I responded to your last post that I had quit smoking cold turkey after fifty years as I wasn’t about to pay for the Dems new insurance program with my tax money should I keep smoking.

I made up my mind to not light up basically, and that’s what I didn’t do. Never lit up another cigarette.

It is also important to know that I spend all my time here at the ranch. I don’t go anywhere except say the supply store, Home Depot for materials, Grocery store....other than that I don’t have anyplace where I would sit and socialize with others that might be smoking, or somebody is around me that is. I do go to the local doughnut shop, but nobody smokes there either.

It helps to avoid those places where some folks are inclined to light ‘em up, and keep your self busy with handi-work. Occupy yourself with something of interest that will benefit you, and keep your hands busy as well keep your mind off of your anxieties.


37 posted on 12/04/2011 7:54:59 AM PST by rockinqsranch (Dems, Libs, Socialists, call 'em what you will, they ALL have fairies livin' in their trees.)
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To: rockinqsranch

I keep getting that server messed up message that we usually get just before FR goes on the blink, as well a double posting.

Hope FR doesn’t go down in flames today.


38 posted on 12/04/2011 7:57:28 AM PST by rockinqsranch (Dems, Libs, Socialists, call 'em what you will, they ALL have fairies livin' in their trees.)
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To: rockinqsranch

I keep getting that service temporarily unavailable messed up message that we usually get just before FR goes on the blink, as well a double posting.

Hope FR doesn’t go down in flames today.


39 posted on 12/04/2011 7:58:11 AM PST by rockinqsranch (Dems, Libs, Socialists, call 'em what you will, they ALL have fairies livin' in their trees.)
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To: Marie

Yes, it does get better. I went through smoking cessation classes through the Navy hospital here. It was pretty rough at first. First week, I felt like a drug addict needing a fix. I made it. I’ve been smoke free for 9 years now. I quit at Thanksgiving 9 years ago. Somehow I managed to quit while my husband was still smoking. He quit a year later.


40 posted on 12/04/2011 7:58:22 AM PST by republicangel
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To: Marie

Yes, it does get better. I went through smoking cessation classes through the Navy hospital here. It was pretty rough at first. First week, I felt like a drug addict needing a fix. I made it. I’ve been smoke free for 9 years now. I quit at Thanksgiving 9 years ago. Somehow I managed to quit while my husband was still smoking. He quit a year later.


41 posted on 12/04/2011 7:58:25 AM PST by republicangel
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To: Marie
Stay strong Marie. 30 thirty years of smoking. At the last was dragging 3 packs a day. Cold turkey is what it had to be. Had tried the gum before but was getting more nicotine that way than with the cigs.

When the urge hit I would instead of just reaching, slap myself in the pocket where I carried. Hard, then say a prayer of thanks to God for taking this urge away and healing my body in Jesus's name. That was Nov. 6, 1996. Money saved? We are driving a new car right now...

Hang in there, it will get better!

42 posted on 12/04/2011 8:08:24 AM PST by Dust in the Wind (U S Troops Rock)
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To: Marie
Stay strong Marie. 30 thirty years of smoking. At the last was dragging 3 packs a day. Cold turkey is what it had to be. Had tried the gum before but was getting more nicotine that way than with the cigs.

When the urge hit I would instead of just reaching, slap myself in the pocket where I carried. Hard, then say a prayer of thanks to God for taking this urge away and healing my body in Jesus's name. That was Nov. 6, 1996. Money saved? We are driving a new car right now...

Hang in there, it will get better!

43 posted on 12/04/2011 8:10:23 AM PST by Dust in the Wind (U S Troops Rock)
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To: Marie

That feeling won’t last forever.

Talk to your doc about an antidepressant, it will blunt the agitation and emotional effects of quitting. You don’t need to take it forever but a it will help while your brain readjusts its chemistry.

Nicotine releases your happy neurotransmitters, it takes a while for your brain to readjust and release them when appropriate.


44 posted on 12/04/2011 8:15:21 AM PST by dangerdoc (see post #6)
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To: Marie
"Ever Wonder What Happens to Your Body the Moment You Stop Smoking? Within 20 minutes of smoking that last cigarette, the body begins a series of changes that continues for years.

20 MINUTES Blood pressure drops to normal. Pulse rate drops to normal. Body temperature of hands and feet increases to normal.

8 HOURS Carbon monoxide level in blood drops to normal. Oxygen level in blood increases to normal.

24 HOURS Chance of heart attack decreases.

48 HOURS Nerve endings start regrowing. Ability to smell and taste is enhanced.

2 WEEKS TO 3 MONTHS Circulation improves. Walking becomes easier. Lung function increases up to 30%.

1 TO 9 MONTHS Coughing, sinus congestion, fatigue, and shortness of breath decrease. Cilia regrow in lungs, increasing ability to handle mucus, clean the lungs, and reduce infection. Body's overall energy increases.

1 YEAR Excess risk of coronary heart disease is half that of a smoker.

5 YEARS Lung cancer death rate for average smoker (one pack a day) decreases by almost half. Stroke risk is reduced to that of a nonsmoker 5-15 years after quitting. Risk of cancer of the mouth, throat and esophagus is half that of a smoker's.

10 YEARS Lung cancer death rate similar to that of nonsmokers. Precancerous cells are replaced. Risk of cancer of the mouth, throat, esophagus, bladder, kidney and pancreas decreases.

15 YEARS Risk of coronary heart disease is that of a nonsmoker."

45 posted on 12/04/2011 8:26:39 AM PST by TaxPayer2000
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To: Marie

A word of caution:

When I quit, the severe cravings subsided during the first few months.

However, at about 6 months, they hit hard. I continued to resist and they subsided in a couple of weeks.

Since that 2nd round of severe cravings, I have not had any more. I do, however, sometimes think how nice it would be to sit back, relax and have a smoke — but I resist.

I am entering the 9th year of being smoke free in January 2012. I just bought a big 24” monitor as a present with my ‘former’ smoking money. :) The monetary savings do add up, and I splurge with a new gadget or two occasionally.

Reward yourself occasionally with your new-found wealth.


46 posted on 12/04/2011 8:32:07 AM PST by TomGuy
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To: Marie
When I quit, cold turkey, I really didn't have much of a “craving” for cigarettes, and what cravings I did have were gone in a few weeks. However, in spite of what the anti-smokers tell us, smoking is quite pleasurable. Smoking to me was often a “treat” I got on a break from work or after I had accomplished something. After I quit smoking, this little pleasurable “reward” was gone. After 5 years, I still miss my little “treats” and nothing has replaced them.Find something else to reward yourself with, I think it will make it easier.
47 posted on 12/04/2011 8:44:47 AM PST by Prokopton
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To: Marie

Definitely echo those who recommended e-cigs.

They help you quit smoking, but you don’t have to change your behavior at all. You only change what you buy.

In the bargain, you get rid of all the nasty stuff associated with smoking - ashtrays, smelly clothes, wheezy lungs, etc.

Plus, if you get the right one, you’ll save $$$.


48 posted on 12/04/2011 8:51:16 AM PST by FLAMING DEATH (Are you better off than you were $4 trillion ago?)
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To: Marie

Oh and get some B-3. Chemically it’s close to Nicotine and sometimes the body can be tricked by it.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Niacin


49 posted on 12/04/2011 9:00:02 AM PST by netmilsmom (Happiness is a choice)
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To: Marie

I tried to quit unsuccessfully many times before finally succeeding over ten years ago.

The first of two keys for me was knowing that time changes everything. You will for certain feel differently about smoking and in general one month from now, six months from now, one year from now, etc.

The second key is to know that the only way to get there is to not smoke a single cigarette. Not even one.

There are lots of things you can do in the meantime to help get your mind in order. I think vigorous physical activity is the biggest one. But that is treating symptoms.

The only cure is time, and the only way to make the time count is to NOT SMOKE!

This is what I did. I stubbed out the last one and never touched another. Now I feel like I have never smoked. I’ve forgotten what it is like to want one. I see or smell cigarettes and am revulsed.


50 posted on 12/04/2011 9:02:27 AM PST by rogue yam
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