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Astronomers Find Biggest Black Holes Yet
http://www.nytimes.com/2011/12/06/science/space/astronomers-find-biggest-black-holes-yet.html?_r=2&hp ^

Posted on 12/08/2011 7:07:54 PM PST by chessplayer

Astronomers are reporting that they have taken the measure of the biggest, baddest black holes yet found in the universe, abyssal yawns 10 times the size of our solar system into which billions of Suns have vanished like a guilty thought.

(Excerpt) Read more at nytimes.com ...


TOPICS: Astronomy
KEYWORDS: catastrophism

1 posted on 12/08/2011 7:07:57 PM PST by chessplayer
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To: chessplayer

All you have to do is look to the occupiers of the White House


2 posted on 12/08/2011 7:09:41 PM PST by al baby (Is that old windbag still on the air ?)
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To: chessplayer

I was wondering just how big those particular black holes were.

Yikes!


3 posted on 12/08/2011 7:10:27 PM PST by Jonty30 (If a person won't learn under the best of times, than he must learn under the worst of times.)
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To: chessplayer

Michelle’s what?


4 posted on 12/08/2011 7:10:44 PM PST by WellyP (REAL)
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To: chessplayer
Image and video hosting by TinyPic Really?
5 posted on 12/08/2011 7:11:16 PM PST by festusbanjo (Seriously, of the remaining GOP field, this is the best that we have to offer?)
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To: festusbanjo

Read the title, it says “black holes” not assholes.


6 posted on 12/08/2011 7:12:24 PM PST by TSgt (Suppose you were an idiot and suppose you were a member of Congress. But I repeat myself.)
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To: chessplayer

7 posted on 12/08/2011 7:13:23 PM PST by TSgt (Suppose you were an idiot and suppose you were a member of Congress. But I repeat myself.)
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To: chessplayer

Even bigger than Uranus?


8 posted on 12/08/2011 7:15:24 PM PST by willgolfforfood
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To: chessplayer

MF Global.
The fraudtational forces are so strong, any money that goes in is never seen again.


9 posted on 12/08/2011 7:16:09 PM PST by mnehring
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To: chessplayer

If black holes absorb everything around them and reduce the mater to nothing, how do they grow? Is the growth comprised of gravity or dark matter? That part has me stumped. I know everything else.


10 posted on 12/08/2011 7:20:50 PM PST by kaboom
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To: kaboom

We live in a mixed community. There are bigger black holes in any of my kid’s high school classes.


11 posted on 12/08/2011 7:22:42 PM PST by huckfillary (qual tyo ta)
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To: kaboom

We live in a mixed community. There are bigger black holes in any of my kid’s high school classes.


12 posted on 12/08/2011 7:23:09 PM PST by huckfillary (qual tyo ta)
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To: al baby

Can’t have ANY thread in here where someone has to spoil it by dragging politics into it, can we?


13 posted on 12/08/2011 7:24:11 PM PST by chessplayer
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To: kaboom

The swirls around the hole resemble those in a washbowl sink ... indicating that graviy prevails out there, as it does on earth.


14 posted on 12/08/2011 7:30:42 PM PST by OldNavyVet
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To: chessplayer

10 times as big as the solar system?

The scale of that illustration shows a black hole much bigger than 10 times, perhaps 80 times or more?

But, I suppose that the article meant to say a diameter ten times as big as the solar system.


15 posted on 12/08/2011 7:39:24 PM PST by adorno (<)
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To: SunkenCiv

Catastrophism ping. I wonder if Ross Perot hears this sucking sound?


16 posted on 12/08/2011 7:41:05 PM PST by Captain Beyond (The Hammer of the gods! (Just a cool line from a Led Zep song))
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To: kaboom

They grow by swallowing up even more. They pull in anything and everything that gets too close, so I imagine they would swallow dark matter and dark energy as well.

http://www.astronomycafe.net/qadir/abholes.html


17 posted on 12/08/2011 7:41:57 PM PST by chessplayer
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To: OldNavyVet
but if all matter that enters it is destroyed, why doesn't it stay the same size?

apologies to all for breaking from the standard humor portion of this broadcast.

18 posted on 12/08/2011 7:42:54 PM PST by kaboom
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To: TSgt

Hahahahahaha!


19 posted on 12/08/2011 7:43:02 PM PST by cloudmountain
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To: chessplayer
Artist conceptions and illustrations, no Hubble photos?

Where's space guy, I'm sure he has a few sitting around.

20 posted on 12/08/2011 7:50:40 PM PST by MaxMax
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To: chessplayer
"Astronomers Find Biggest BlackBung Holes Yet"/>

"Will there be any TP there?"

21 posted on 12/08/2011 7:52:58 PM PST by greatdefender (If You Want Peace.....Prepare For War)
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To: kaboom
I would imagine that matter is destroyed like wood is in a fire.

The wood's constituent matter still exists, just not recognizable as its original form.

The matter's mass, however, is added to that already a part of the singularity, thus making the hole bigger, if you will.

22 posted on 12/08/2011 7:54:47 PM PST by Hoplite
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To: Captain Beyond
Thanks Captain Beyond.


23 posted on 12/08/2011 7:55:14 PM PST by SunkenCiv (It's never a bad time to FReep this link -- https://secure.freerepublic.com/donate/)
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To: chessplayer

racists!


24 posted on 12/08/2011 8:00:24 PM PST by stefanbatory (Insert witty tagline here)
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To: greatdefender

The vastness of space truly boggles the mind. A couple of years ago I was having dinner with some friends. One guy, visiting from NYC, is a professor of astrophysics. My son and I got him in a corner and tried to get him to explain infinity to us. He really couldn’t. With the discovery of that Kepler-22B, it’s even more confusing. How on earth (no pun intended) can these rocket scientists predict how many millions of light years away we are from that planet? How can they even see it with the Hubble Telescope?


25 posted on 12/08/2011 8:00:46 PM PST by Ax
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To: adorno

A diameter 10 times the size of our solar system would mean the black hole has a diameter (way) more than the distance between our sun and the closest star, 4.3 light-years away. Yikes! It would be well over 12 light-years across. Good grief.

http://curious.astro.cornell.edu/question.php?number=374


26 posted on 12/08/2011 8:09:19 PM PST by chessplayer
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To: OldNavyVet

You must have seen the movie “Black Hole”, a Disney film, in the late 70’s, with Maximillian Schell, Ernest Borgnine, Yvette Mimieux (Always beatiful like a star), one of the Bottoms boys, and Old Bob.


27 posted on 12/08/2011 8:28:24 PM PST by MadMax, the Grinning Reaper
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To: SunkenCiv

28 posted on 12/08/2011 9:09:39 PM PST by JoeProBono (A closed mouth gathers no feet - Mater tua caligas gerit)
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To: chessplayer

Astronomers worry about a pair of black holes,

the rest of us worry about a black pair of a-holes...


29 posted on 12/08/2011 9:10:23 PM PST by bigbob
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To: bigbob
Now now, we only know ONE of them is actually black.

The other is an Arab, that's passing. (Show us the REAL BC)

30 posted on 12/08/2011 9:17:11 PM PST by rawcatslyentist (It is necessary that a person be born of a father who is a citizen; ~Vattel's Law of Nations)
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To: kaboom
It does not really destroy the matter but breaks it down and absorbs it into it's mass.
31 posted on 12/08/2011 9:43:26 PM PST by dog breath
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To: Ax
How on earth (no pun intended) can these rocket scientists predict how many millions of light years away we are from that planet? How can they even see it with the Hubble Telescope?

"Next on Unsolved Mysteries....."

32 posted on 12/08/2011 9:48:24 PM PST by greatdefender (If You Want Peace.....Prepare For War)
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To: Ax

“The vastness of space truly boggles the mind.”

Yes, I was reading a book this summer, Multiple Universes, by Kaku and he said that astronomers estimate that we can only see a small part of what is out there, that if the universe was the size of a basket ball, what we can see would be only the size of a quarter.


33 posted on 12/08/2011 9:53:08 PM PST by garjog
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To: Ax
"The vastness of space truly boggles the mind."

Yes, I was reading a book this summer, Paralell Worlds, by Kaku and he said that astronomers estimate that we can only see a small part of what is out there. He said that if the universe were the size of a basket ball, what we can see would be the size of a quarter.


34 posted on 12/08/2011 9:56:21 PM PST by garjog
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To: Ax
"The vastness of space truly boggles the mind."

Yes, I was reading a book this summer, Parallel Worlds, by Kaku and he said that astronomers estimate that we can only see a small part of what is out there. He said that if the universe were the size of a basket ball, what we can see would be the size of a quarter.


35 posted on 12/08/2011 9:56:47 PM PST by garjog
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To: chessplayer; All
Huh?

This is from the NY times. What do you think they are? They are democrat/socialist political operatives masquerading as news people.

Anyone who believes anything in the NY Times or any mainstream media is being fooled.

want an example? how about how they changed global warming to climate change when people realized it was getting colder not warmer?

Another example . what happened to the BP oil spill that was supposed to be so catastrophic? the hole in the Ozone layer and so on ad infinitum.

I'm telling you all the media has a reason for publishing this black hole bs . I don't buy anything they put out.

People think this is science. LOL LOL LOL. this is socialist propaganda.

36 posted on 12/08/2011 10:30:59 PM PST by Democrat_media (China is destroying all our jobs and manufacturing ability. China makes everything.)
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To: chessplayer
Astronomers Find Biggest Black Holes Yet

European Union?

37 posted on 12/08/2011 11:14:12 PM PST by gunsequalfreedom (Conservative is not a label of convenience. It is a guide to your actions.)
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To: Democrat_media

Yeah,,,the story about black holes is just a hippy/commie plot to take over the world.


38 posted on 12/09/2011 3:24:20 AM PST by chessplayer
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To: Ax

They can estimate the distance by a couple methods. For some objects, they can use the principle of parralax, basically, taking measurements when the Earth is at one end of its orbit, and then comparing to when we are at the other end of the orbit in order to get a triangulation. If that doesn’t work, they usually rely on the redshift values of the star and any objects in front of or behind it to get an estimation. The redshift value tells them how fast the star is moving away from us, and from that try to estimate the distance.


39 posted on 12/09/2011 6:43:59 AM PST by Boogieman
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To: Boogieman

Thanks, Boogieman. But my mind is still boggling. It seems to me that there is a line where knowledge ends and guessing begins. Educated guesses, mind you, but guesses nonetheless.


40 posted on 12/09/2011 7:07:29 AM PST by Ax
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To: garjog

I can’t comprehend the vastness of space, to me, there has to be an end out there like the walls of a box.


41 posted on 12/09/2011 7:15:31 AM PST by Hot Tabasco (Be good, Santa is coming)
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To: Ax

Yeah, I think with the nearby stars, they can use the parallax method, which is pretty certain, but for the further out ones, it involves more guesswork.


42 posted on 12/09/2011 7:43:56 AM PST by Boogieman
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To: kaboom
The growth is measured two ways. One is by mass, which I think you get; and the other is by the diameter of the "event horizon," which is the location where the escape velocity is the same as the speed of light.

I presume that this article is describing black holes where the event horizon is about the diameter of the orbit of Neptune around the sun. Everything inside that cannot escape.

The matter that makes up a black hole is "ordinary matter," but squished tight. The atoms around us, what we think of as "solid" stuff, is mostly space. If the nucleus is a marble, the electron shell of hydrogen is about a half-mile diameter (helium is a little smaller, but still, the point being, atoms are mostly empty). Under intense pressure, such as provided by gravity and many close neighboring particles, the electrons meet the nuclei, but the matter is still "ordinary," being detectable by its mass.

If the earth was squished tight, it would be, IIRC, about 150 yard radius. Squished tight enough, it would make a black hole with an event horizon under that size.

43 posted on 12/09/2011 8:24:04 AM PST by Cboldt
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To: chessplayer
-- A diameter 10 times the size of our solar system would mean the black hole has a diameter (way) more than the distance between our sun and the closest star, 4.3 light-years away. --

Your math is off, somehow. From the sun to Neptune is about 4.55 billion km - so give the solar system a diameter of about 9 billion km. Light travels about 300,000 km per second (sun to earth, about 8 minutes). So, 30,000 seconds times 300,000 km/sec is 9 that billion km. An object ten time bigger (that the orbit of Neptune) is covered by light in 300,000 seconds, about 3.5 days.

Or, just take this (uses a bigger solar system diameter), from your link ...

This means you could put the Solar System about 3440 times between the Sun and the nearest star taking this definition.

44 posted on 12/09/2011 8:39:38 AM PST by Cboldt
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To: Hot Tabasco
-- I can't comprehend the vastness of space, to me, there has to be an end out there like the walls of a box. --

If you haven't read "Flatland," grab a copy online and check it out.

The point being, that although we can't picture it, it may be possible to have a finite volume that doesn't end like the walls of a box (or sphere).

Earth has a finite area, but no edge in 2-d.

Even then, the volume of the universe is mind boggling - and so is the emptiness - and so is the physical violence! Collisions, fusion, heat, velocities, energy releases that are so far beyond our earth-bound experience, that they defy comprehension. Even though mother nature is pretty tough, the surface of the earth is a very peaceful corner of the universe.

45 posted on 12/09/2011 8:45:24 AM PST by Cboldt
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To: Hot Tabasco

“I can’t comprehend the vastness of space, to me, there has to be an end out there like the walls of a box.”

Yes, and what is crazy is that they say that space it self is expanding like a balloon, getting bigger and bigger until some day everything is so cold that there will be no energy for anything to move.

But, that is just our universe. Some of these guys think that there are millions of universes that are constantly bubbling up from a constant big bang. Some of these over lap with ours without us realizing it. So it looks like a bath tub with bubbles, each its own universe.

That is cool to my thinking because it sounds like what Christians have always said — that this world is passing away, that there is a better place we are going. Think the many worlds of CS Lewis’s Narnia stories.


46 posted on 12/09/2011 12:59:02 PM PST by garjog
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