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Mammoth Mummies Mysteries
Scientific American 'blogs ^ | December 8, 2011 | David Bressan

Posted on 12/10/2011 8:32:01 AM PST by SunkenCiv

Natural mummies can be preserved in bog deposits, in tar pits, deep inside caves, glacier ice or permafrost -- an environment too cold for an effective decomposition of organic matter.

At least 16 species of ice age mammals have been found mummified complete or partially: woolly mammoth, Shasta-, Jefferson´s- and Patagonian ground sloth, woolly rhinoceros, Yukon horse, steppe bison, helmeted muskox, Harrington´s mountain goat, caribou, giant moose, black-footed ferret, collared pika, snowshoe hare, arctic ground squirrel and vole. The ground sloths and mountain goats were found inside of caves. The woolly rhinoceros and mammoth of Starunia (Ukraine) became "pickled" in salty groundwater and coated by natural occurring mineral waxes.

Some of the best preserved and oldest natural mummies were found in thawing permafrost in Siberia, Alaska and Canada: like the 40.000 year old Russian mammoth calf "Dima" (discovered in 1977) or the 36.000 year old bison "Blue Babe" (discovered in 1979) from Fairbanks (Alaska) and a 40.000 year old black-footed ferret from the Yukon territory. Other exceptionally well preserved mammoth calves are "Lyuba" (2007), the 50.000 years old male "Khroma" (2009) and a new described calf found in the Siberian region of Yukaghir.

(Excerpt) Read more at blogs.scientificamerican.com ...


TOPICS: History; Science; Travel
KEYWORDS: catastrophism; godsgravesglyphs; mammoth; mammoths
Fig.3. In the last 200 years many mummified mammoths were discovered in the thawing permafrost of Siberia. Considering the amount of fossil ivory commercialized in the same period, there must have been carcasses and bones of thousand of specimens.

Mammoth Mummies Mysteries

1 posted on 12/10/2011 8:32:05 AM PST by SunkenCiv
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The Cycle of Cosmic Catastrophes: Flood, Fire, and Famine in the History of Civilization The Cycle of Cosmic Catastrophes:
Flood, Fire, and Famine
in the History of Civilization

by Richard Firestone,
Allen West, and
Simon Warwick-Smith


2 posted on 12/10/2011 8:35:01 AM PST by SunkenCiv (It's never a bad time to FReep this link -- https://secure.freerepublic.com/donate/)
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Immanuel Velikovsky, “Earth in Upheaval”, p 4

“High in the north above Siberia, six hundred miles inside the Polar Circle, in the Arctic Ocean, lie the Liakhov Islands. Liakhov was a hunter who, in the days of Catherine II, ventured to these islands and brought back the report that they abounded in mammoths’ bones. “Such was the enormous quantity of mammoths’ remains that it seemed . . . that the island was actually composed of the bones and tusks of elephants, cemented together by icy sand.”

The New Siberian Islands, discovered in 1805 and 1806, as well as the islands of Stolbovoi and Belkov to the west, present the same picture. “The soil of these desolate islands is absolutely packed full of the bones of elephants and rhinoceroses in astonishing numbers.”


3 posted on 12/10/2011 8:35:01 AM PST by SunkenCiv (It's never a bad time to FReep this link -- https://secure.freerepublic.com/donate/)
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To: 75thOVI; agrace; aimhigh; Alice in Wonderland; AndrewC; aragorn; aristotleman; Avoiding_Sulla; ...



4 posted on 12/10/2011 8:35:01 AM PST by SunkenCiv (It's never a bad time to FReep this link -- https://secure.freerepublic.com/donate/)
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To: Renfield; StayAt HomeMother; Ernest_at_the_Beach; decimon; 1010RD; 21twelve; 24Karet; ...

 GGG managers are SunkenCiv, StayAt HomeMother & Ernest_at_the_Beach
Thanks Renfield.

To all -- please ping me to other topics which are appropriate for the GGG list.


5 posted on 12/10/2011 8:35:08 AM PST by SunkenCiv (It's never a bad time to FReep this link -- https://secure.freerepublic.com/donate/)
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Fig.4. Preserved mammoth skin with residual fur attached in display during a fossil fair in 2007.

Mammoth Mummies Mysteries

6 posted on 12/10/2011 8:35:58 AM PST by SunkenCiv (It's never a bad time to FReep this link -- https://secure.freerepublic.com/donate/)
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To: SunkenCiv
I thought this would be good article...but the author went off on a tanager on bad “b” sifi movies and global warming
7 posted on 12/10/2011 8:44:04 AM PST by tophat9000 (American is Barack Oaken)
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To: tophat9000

tanange=tangent


8 posted on 12/10/2011 8:46:30 AM PST by tophat9000 (American is Barack Oaken)
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To: tophat9000

The periglacial areas were the best for grazing.

The wall of the glacier shielded the area from the bitter north wind, the dazzling vertical wall acts as a solar concentrator providing more heat and light for plant growth, the glacial till provides a rich, well conditioned soil, while moraines trap ponds of melt water.

Up near the face of the glacier is the best grazing for a thousand miles!

Until a big chunk breaks off and pounds you into the muck before you even have a chance to swallow that mouthful of marigolds...


9 posted on 12/10/2011 8:49:04 AM PST by null and void (This is day 1054 of America's ObamaVacation from reality.)
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To: SunkenCiv

The extinction according to the liberals would be caused by 1) global warming caused by the evil white man with SUVs, 2)global cooling by the same or 3) G W Bush.


10 posted on 12/10/2011 8:49:16 AM PST by ExCTCitizen (Cain/West 2012....what would the RACISTS LIBERALS say???)
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To: SunkenCiv

Ancient elephant’s/mammoth’s graveyard?


11 posted on 12/10/2011 9:06:29 AM PST by TheOldLady (FReepmail me to get ON or OFF the ZOT LIGHTNING ping list)
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To: null and void

Thumbs up!


12 posted on 12/10/2011 9:21:07 AM PST by Track9
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To: SunkenCiv
This single comment proves Bressan is an "ideological scientist," not a real scientist:

"Anyway, the warming of the Canadian Arctic due anthropogenic climate change..."

After reading that I could take nothing he wrote seriously.

13 posted on 12/10/2011 9:29:37 AM PST by Bernard Marx
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To: SunkenCiv

Are there a lot of maps and pictures in The Cycle of Cosmic Catastrophes? I was considering buying it on my Kindle but I don’t like reading books if you have to flip back to maps and frequently look at pictures to get a good understanding.


14 posted on 12/10/2011 9:33:18 AM PST by Sawdring
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To: Sawdring; SunkenCiv; neverdem; narses; patton; CholeraJoe; MHGinTN
Are there a lot of maps and pictures in The Cycle of Cosmic Catastrophes? I was considering buying it on my Kindle but I don’t like reading books if you have to flip back to maps and frequently look at pictures to get a good understanding.

It's very difficult to read detailed scientific articles and books (their color graphs, charts, and photo's or illustrations) on the black-and-gray-and-white small screen of Amazon's (current version) of the Kindle.

Great for text-based books, great for travel and airline waiting areas. But for scientific books? Not so good, unless you don't need the graphics.)

15 posted on 12/10/2011 9:58:11 AM PST by Robert A. Cook, PE (I can only donate monthly, but socialists' ABBCNNBCBS continue to lie every day!)
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To: Sawdring; Robert A. Cook, PE

There are a few, but they’re easy to absorb upon one viewing, and having good captions as well.


16 posted on 12/10/2011 10:22:59 AM PST by SunkenCiv (It's never a bad time to FReep this link -- https://secure.freerepublic.com/donate/)
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To: tophat9000; ExCTCitizen; Bernard Marx

He’s a blogger, young by the sound of him, and actually helps us out — NOTHING of this kind — widespread, sudden extinction — has happened in modern times, despite claims that “whole taxa” will vanish because of chainsaws, Aquanet, cattle farts, etc etc. We will survive this, they will not.


17 posted on 12/10/2011 10:45:19 AM PST by SunkenCiv (It's never a bad time to FReep this link -- https://secure.freerepublic.com/donate/)
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To: tophat9000
I thought this would be good article...but the author went off on a tanager on bad “b” sifi movies and global warming

Fortunately for the tanager, the author was a lightweight so it wasn't too heavily laden.

18 posted on 12/10/2011 10:58:19 AM PST by RegulatorCountry
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To: SunkenCiv

So when does the Mammoth steak cookoff at $100,000 a head start?


19 posted on 12/10/2011 11:21:01 AM PST by Just another Joe (Warning: FReeping can be addictive and helpful to your mental health)
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To: SunkenCiv
NOTHING of this kind — widespread, sudden extinction — has happened in modern times

What widespread, sudden extinction?

The article references mummies spread over many thousands of years and at least 14,000 years.

There is no particular reason to believe anything other than that there were a large number of separate events, in both time and space, that trapped the animals and killed them, after which some became mummified.

20 posted on 12/10/2011 12:07:12 PM PST by Sherman Logan
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To: Bernard Marx
"Anyway, the warming of the Canadian Arctic due anthropogenic climate change..."

After reading that I could take nothing he wrote seriously.

You are misreading him. In this sentence he is describing the plot of a movie. He may very well believe in AGW, but you can't deduce it from his description of a movie.

The notion of early man as a Typhoid Mary causing mass extinctions is a new one to me. But it sounds like a load of bull. As the author says, disease organisms are usually too exquisitely adapted to their hosts to jump to multiple species.

21 posted on 12/10/2011 12:14:31 PM PST by Sherman Logan
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To: Sherman Logan
I admit I quickly skim-read and could be guilty as charged.

I agree that early man and his diseases causing animal extinctions is BS. Something not yet understood happened to cause the Pleistocene megafauna extinctions. Eventually we'll probably figure it out but pontificating on the basis of present evidence is pointless.

22 posted on 12/10/2011 12:26:09 PM PST by Bernard Marx
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To: SunkenCiv
The hypothesis of an unidentified hyperdisease killing entire species was proposed in 1997 after the first epidemics of Ebola in 1976-1979 and 1994-1996.

Silly scientists.

The Ebola outbreaks themselves showed why this scenario is highly implausible. The organisms caused extreme death rates in a short time, but in the process "burned through" their available hosts and then, as an inevitable results, died themselves. This is despite the fact that the areas in question had only minimal medical resources.

With modern human technology, a highly deadly disease could spread fast enough to stay ahead of its own killing of its hosts, but probably not otherwise.

Also, I can see how humans could pick up diseases from the mammoths they killed, but fail to see how mammoths could be infected by humans. Surely they weren't in any kind of close contact on a regular basis. Which is how we acquired most of our infectious diseases by transmission from our domesticates.

23 posted on 12/10/2011 12:44:35 PM PST by Sherman Logan
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To: SunkenCiv
Siberian mammoth tusks on the ivory floor at the London Docks.

© National Maritime Museum, London

Repro ID: H6324

Description: Dock officials check a consignment of ivory at London Docks. The ivory warehouse at Wapping was one of the most dazzling sights of the port. The ivory was weighed, examined, classified and laid out for the inspection of the buyers who in due time would arrange for it to be transformed into piano keys, billiard balls and countless other luxury items.

Creator: Illustrated London News. Date: 1873 Credit line: National Maritime Museum, London

source

24 posted on 12/10/2011 1:31:24 PM PST by Fred Nerks (FAIR DINKUM!)
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