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Astronomy Picture of the Day -- NGC 253: The Sculptor Galaxy
NASA ^ | December 20, 2011 | (see photo credit)

Posted on 12/20/2011 2:31:02 AM PST by SunkenCiv

Explanation: NGC 253 is not only one of the brightest spiral galaxies visible, it is also one of the dustiest. Discovered in 1783 by Caroline Herschel in the constellation of Sculptor, NGC 253 lies only about ten million light-years distant. NGC 253 is the largest member of the Sculptor Group of Galaxies, the nearest group to our own Local Group of Galaxies. The dense dark dust accompanies a high star formation rate, giving NGC 253 the designation of starburst galaxy. Visible in the above photograph is the active central nucleus, also known to be a bright source of X-rays and gamma rays.

December 20, 2011

(Excerpt) Read more at 129.164.179.22 ...


TOPICS: Astronomy; Astronomy Picture of the Day; Science
KEYWORDS: apod; astronomy; falsecolor; ngc253; science; sculptorgalaxy
[Credit & Copyright: Angus Lau]

1 posted on 12/20/2011 2:31:06 AM PST by SunkenCiv
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To: brytlea; cripplecreek; decimon; bigheadfred; KoRn; Grammy; married21; steelyourfaith; Mmogamer; ...

2 posted on 12/20/2011 2:32:05 AM PST by SunkenCiv (Merry Christmas, Happy New Year! May 2013 be even Happier!)
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To: SunkenCiv

WOW!


3 posted on 12/20/2011 2:32:41 AM PST by bmwcyle (I am ready to serve Jesus on Earth because the GOP failed again)
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To: SunkenCiv
"NGC 253 lies only about ten million light-years distant."

ONE light year, the DISTANCE light travels in a year at the speed of 186,000 miles per second, works out to about 6 TRILLION miles.

4 posted on 12/20/2011 3:29:52 AM PST by ETL (ALL (most?) of the Obama-commie connections at my FR Home page: http://www.freerepublic.com/~etl/)
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To: SunkenCiv

“... one of the dustiest galaxies”

Sounds like my kind of galaxy.


5 posted on 12/20/2011 3:34:08 AM PST by momtothree
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To: SunkenCiv

ONLY?

That’s not toooo far far away...is it? LOL


6 posted on 12/20/2011 3:36:22 AM PST by left that other site
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To: SunkenCiv

“... one of the dustiest galaxies”

It must have a permit from the EPA.


7 posted on 12/20/2011 3:42:39 AM PST by Red_Devil 232 (VietVet - USMC All Ready On The Right? All Ready On The Left? All Ready On The Firing Line!)
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To: SunkenCiv

Only ten million light years? Just a short jaunt down the inter-galactic highway.

It still amazes me, that given the number of galaxies out there, the number of stars in each galaxy, even with the physical limitations required for life to exist, some people persist in maintaining that our tiney speck of dust is the only inhabited world.


8 posted on 12/20/2011 3:53:09 AM PST by ixtl ( You live and learn. Or you don't live long.)
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To: Red_Devil 232

Dust credits — more than we could ever sell ‘em.


9 posted on 12/20/2011 4:04:31 AM PST by SunkenCiv (Merry Christmas, Happy New Year! May 2013 be even Happier!)
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A Black Hole-Powered Spiral Galaxy

NGC 7742

The term "black hole" is a region of space from which nothing can return.

A black hole is a concentration of mass great enough that the force of gravity prevents anything past its event horizon from escaping it. The gravitational field is so strong that the escape velocity past its event horizon exceeds the speed of light. This implies that nothing, not even light, inside the event horizon can escape its gravity. It is, however, theorized that wormholes can let one exit a black hole. Objects in a gravitational field experience a slowing down of time, called time dilation.

10 posted on 12/20/2011 4:15:17 AM PST by anglian
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To: anglian
This implies that nothing, not even light, inside the event horizon can escape its gravity.

Except its gravity.
11 posted on 12/20/2011 4:20:39 AM PST by aruanan
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To: SunkenCiv
..."one of the brightest spiral galaxies..."

Really? What's its IQ?

12 posted on 12/20/2011 5:45:55 AM PST by TheOldLady (FReepmail me to get ON or OFF the ZOT LIGHTNING ping list)
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To: SunkenCiv

So beautiful...


13 posted on 12/20/2011 6:01:43 AM PST by DeoVindiceSicSemperTyrannis
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To: SunkenCiv


14 posted on 12/20/2011 6:06:51 AM PST by JoeProBono (A closed mouth gathers no feet - Mater tua caligas gerit)
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To: SunkenCiv

Beauty in the skies. Thanks.


15 posted on 12/20/2011 6:38:40 AM PST by no-to-illegals (Please God, Protect and Bless Our Men and Women in Uniform with Victory. Amen.)
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To: SunkenCiv

Last time I was out with the scope, I took a peak at 253. It’s VERY large and bright. It crosses the meridian right at sunset now.

At the same time I was looking at 253, the guy who owns the land we were using was imaging it with his set up. His pictures look much more like those posted than my view in my 10inch.


16 posted on 12/20/2011 7:35:11 AM PST by Conan the Librarian (The Best in Life is to crush my enemies, see them driven before me, and the Dewey Decimal System)
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To: ETL

So we’re only 2.5 “Light Dollars” in debt. No wonder Obama thinks we can spend more, 2.5 seems a low number.


17 posted on 12/20/2011 7:43:04 AM PST by Boomer One
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To: Conan the Librarian
Last time I was out with the scope, I took a peak at 253. It’s VERY large and bright.

Of course you saw it as it was about ten million years ago, as it took that long for the light/image we see today to arrive here. I know you know you this, but others may not realize it.

18 posted on 12/20/2011 8:46:47 AM PST by ETL (ALL (most?) of the Obama-commie connections at my FR Home page: http://www.freerepublic.com/~etl/)
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To: Conan the Librarian
I know you know you this
19 posted on 12/20/2011 8:48:26 AM PST by ETL (ALL (most?) of the Obama-commie connections at my FR Home page: http://www.freerepublic.com/~etl/)
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To: ETL

Well Yes.

A Telescope is a time machine. You can look into the past and only see what was. Even the stuff that is close to us (even in the solar system) is time delayed.


20 posted on 12/20/2011 9:37:39 AM PST by Conan the Librarian (The Best in Life is to crush my enemies, see them driven before me, and the Dewey Decimal System)
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To: JoeProBono

Cat’s Eye.


21 posted on 12/20/2011 2:59:05 PM PST by SunkenCiv (Merry Christmas, Happy New Year! May 2013 be even Happier!)
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To: ixtl
It still amazes me, that given the number of galaxies out there, the number of stars in each galaxy, even with the physical limitations required for life to exist, some people persist in maintaining that our tiney speck of dust is the only inhabited world.

I used to agree wholeheartedly with you, even writing a paper supporting that view. That was the argument made famous fifty years ago by astronomers Willy Ley (iirc) and Carl Sagan.

To the uninitiated it seems like an irrefutable argument, residing as it does in the largest possible numbers: a hundred billion galaxies each housing a hundred billion stars, rotated by innumerable planets.

However, science has progressed considerably since Sagan, to put it mildly; he took into account only two dependent factors. Now there are literally hundreds of dependent factors known, all of which must be within narrow parameters for any life to exist, must less intelligent life.

For a list of those parameters, see "Probability for Life”. It posits at least 10²² planets in the universe but finds that, "Thus, less than 1 chance in 10^282 (million trillion trillion trillion trillion trillion trillion trillion trillion trillion trillion trillion trillion trillion trillion trillion trillion trillion trillion trillion trillion trillion trillion trillion) exists that even one such life-support body would occur anywhere in the universe without invoking divine miracles."

And we're already on one.

22 posted on 12/20/2011 3:25:15 PM PST by Hebrews 11:6 (Do you REALLY believe that (1) God IS, and (2) God IS GOOD?)
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To: aruanan

Ooooh, that was a good post!


23 posted on 12/20/2011 5:36:14 PM PST by SunkenCiv (Merry Christmas, Happy New Year! May 2013 be even Happier!)
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To: Hebrews 11:6

Believe me, I understand where you are coming from. And I don’t take the phrase “miracle of life” lightly. And no, I don’t believe my position is an irrefutable argument. But as author Michael Crichton once wrote (I think in was in “Jurassic Park”) “Life will find a way.” Before you rule out all possibilities, look at the extreme conditions life endures here on Earth. From the Antarctic ice, to super-heated thermal vents, you find living things. Then consider the possibilities of other types of life. Just thinking about it boggles my mind, but in a good way.


24 posted on 12/21/2011 5:43:13 AM PST by ixtl ( You live and learn. Or you don't live long.)
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To: ixtl
It rather sounds like you are invoking the old "given enough time, life will appear" canard. The problem is that, without any sort of "primordial soup" and in the harshest imaginable conditions, just after the earth's late heavy bombardment, we find evidence of life within ten million years. That is far too short a period for life to evolve.

The inevitable result, that God put life here, leads also to your result: that God also created life that can withstand and even thrive in extreme conditions. That doesn't boggle my mind, it satisfies it, and it directs it to its wise and benevolent Creator.

25 posted on 12/21/2011 2:53:18 PM PST by Hebrews 11:6 (Do you REALLY believe that (1) God IS, and (2) God IS GOOD?)
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To: Hebrews 11:6

With all due respect, that is not what I was saying. What I was saying is that we limit our thinking - life must be carbon based, needs water and oxygen, etc. Your own quote: “(T)hat God also created life that can withstand and even thrive in harsh conditions.” When we set the paramets for life, we seek to limit God. Who is to say that on some other world, in some other galaxy, God has created electromagnetic life? (just an example).

Have a Merry Christmas and a Blessed New Year.


26 posted on 12/21/2011 3:46:27 PM PST by ixtl ( You live and learn. Or you don't live long.)
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To: ixtl
We already know of an entirely different type of life-form God has indeed created, significantly more exotic than the example you cited: the angelic creatures. So, I'm certainly not limiting Him, either. But the conditions He has permitted us to see throughout the universe appear to limit not just carbon-based life but non-God-created life. I'm guessing we can agree on that!
27 posted on 12/21/2011 5:59:13 PM PST by Hebrews 11:6 (Do you REALLY believe that (1) God IS, and (2) God IS GOOD?)
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