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Massive 1,100+ year old Maya site discovered in Georgia's mountains
National Architecture & Design | Examiner.com ^ | December 21, 2011 | Richard Thornton

Posted on 12/22/2011 7:57:09 PM PST by LucyT

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To: LucyT

"3D virtual reality image was made from the Johannes Loubser site plan. There may be many other hidden structures in the ancient site."


51 posted on 12/23/2011 5:46:18 AM PST by JoeProBono (A closed mouth gathers no feet - Mater tua caligas gerit)
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To: MCF

War.


52 posted on 12/23/2011 5:47:21 AM PST by 1010RD (First, Do No Harm)
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To: doodad

Or once thought you could. ;-]


53 posted on 12/23/2011 5:53:48 AM PST by 1010RD (First, Do No Harm)
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To: bunkerhill7
The bow and arrow was commonly used in The Old World for several thousand years. The Atl-Atl hung on for far longer in The New World.

The "evidence" of what kinds of weapons were in use is the size of the points. Very small points are "darts" used in blow guns. Very large points were used on spears of the sort thrown by the Atl-Atl. Mid-sized points, which don't begin appearing in significant numbers in North America until the 600-800 period, were used on arrows (as in bow and arrow technology).

You can look at folk tales and if someone's talking about "arrows" that means later than 700 AD.

That brings us back to the question of whether or not bow and arrow tech was "spread to the Americas" by Old World visitors, or was an indigenous invention.

There were certainly plenty of opportunities for the bow and arrow to be brought here ~ so why didn't it happen? Or, was it as late as the period when the primitive Swedes obtained the design for clinker built hulls from the more advanced Sa'ami?

Rather like the chariot, upon its invention was the Viking dragon boat immediately put to use finding new Western lands?

54 posted on 12/23/2011 5:59:59 AM PST by muawiyah
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To: SunkenCiv


55 posted on 12/23/2011 6:02:21 AM PST by JoeProBono (A closed mouth gathers no feet - Mater tua caligas gerit)
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To: JoeProBono
Good morning.

Looks like one of two things. Either the fuel tank from a Russian space craft, or "Wilson," all grown up.

I know, an obscure reference...

5.56mm

56 posted on 12/23/2011 6:16:36 AM PST by M Kehoe
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To: M Kehoe

;-{)


57 posted on 12/23/2011 6:21:56 AM PST by JoeProBono (A closed mouth gathers no feet - Mater tua caligas gerit)
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To: oldplayer

Everybody knew everything
Distance was not a factor

Stephen Lekson


58 posted on 12/23/2011 6:51:16 AM PST by bert (K.E. N.P. +12 ..... Crucifixion is coming)
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To: radu

More info on Etowah Indian Mounds with a video.

http://lostworlds.org/etowah_mounds/


59 posted on 12/23/2011 6:58:20 AM PST by Atlantan
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To: null and void; FlingWingFlyer
We’ll never be able to shut those La Raza lowlifes up now.

Yeah. Call a Mexican an Indian and see how froggy they get. All hopping mad. They AREN'T Indians. Just a bunch of indignant, indigent, idiotic half-breed wannabee leftovers from the Spanish RAPE of the Americas.

They can get on the return to Europe bus first. So they can sit in the back...

60 posted on 12/23/2011 7:08:08 AM PST by bigheadfred (MERRY CHRISTMAS)
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To: kelly4c; Rebelbase
I’m still trying to figure out “exactly” what I am

Why not just go with "AMERICAN"? Don't worry. You'll fit right in.

61 posted on 12/23/2011 7:12:59 AM PST by bigheadfred (MERRY CHRISTMAS)
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To: LucyT
A personal note from the author:

I am astounded by the interest in this article. Normally, I am followed by a modest cadre of progressive archaeologists and Native Americans. For unknown reasons, I was not able to comment on my article, but I would like to respond to some of the comments, since it is obvious that several readers are reading the comments rather than the article. The situation is getting out of hand, with numerous web sites on the internet debating comments to this article as if they were the article. Being a writer for the Examiner, I must stay in the realm of journalism and not get into pre-adolescent cat fights and personal attacks that have become commonplace in the world of blogs and social networking.

Let it suffice to say that since the simultaneous passing of several absolute giants of Southeastern archaeology in 1979, the profession has increasing stagnated, become cult-like and lost its desire to gain new knowledge. I personally heard one of the archaeologists state at a Society of Georgia Archaeology meeting, "We have learned all there is to know about the Southeastern Indians. It is time to move on to other things." Yes, it IS time for them move out of the way.

=======================================================

In a nutshell, this is what has happened to anthropology. It has devolved into a petty, snarling mob of idealogues who spend most of their time stabbing each other in the back so better to win their particular arguments. The appearance of the loathsome "feminist anthropology" in the 70s was the beginning, in which men are excluded from the science by feminist harpies. What a shame.

62 posted on 12/23/2011 7:16:14 AM PST by pabianice (")
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To: sawmill trash
Maybe they will find page 2 of that Mayan calendar everyone is talking about, the one that ends in 2012 ...

Just send them a charitable donation, they'll send another calendar...

63 posted on 12/23/2011 7:17:11 AM PST by Smokin' Joe (How often God must weep at humans' folly. Stand fast. God knows what He is doing)
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To: bigheadfred
¡Sí! El Indio is a mortal insult to a Mexican, even (or perhaps especially) if he is of Amerind ancestry.

And if you really want to tweek them tell them that as a person of Germanic ancestry, you really love their music.

Ooom pa, ooom pa, ooom pa pa pa...

64 posted on 12/23/2011 7:19:56 AM PST by null and void (Day 1066 of America's ObamaVacation from reality [Heroes aren't made, Frank, they're cornered...])
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To: x_plus_one
"The Maya and Aztecs had a thing for gold."

They were complete pikers compared to the Inca.

65 posted on 12/23/2011 7:35:14 AM PST by Flag_This (Real presidents don't bow.)
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To: oldplayer
I thought you brought up a good point about how cultural influences travel even faster then people. The networks of trails and roads that the Native people created across the country are an interesting testament to the importance of trade. Many highways follow those paths for to all people trade is important, along those Indian trails come thoughts with bits of soapstone, copper and obsidian. I think the extent of the traffic in goods and ideas was not fully realized by the Europeans. In the museum at the Hopewell National Historic Park in Ohio they display goods traded across the continent.
66 posted on 12/23/2011 7:44:49 AM PST by dog breath
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To: LucyT
"Around the year 800 AD the flourishing Maya civilization of Central America suddenly began a rapid collapse. A series of catastrophic volcanic eruptions were followed by two long periods of extreme drought conditions and unending wars between city states."

The very first paragraph is complete crap.

There was no sudden collapse of the Mayan civilization. Their civilization seemed to have arisen in the southern highlands of Guatemala and then spread northwards. Over time, different city states rose and then fell (for many different reasons). El Mirador was abandoned around 150 A.D. Ceren, in El Salvador, was destroyed by a volcanic eruption around 600 A.D. Tikal and Copan fell around the mid 800's. Chichen Itza was a major regional power in 1000 A.D. Mayapan was thriving until the 1400's.

Nothing against Georgia, but I don't see the Maya hiking there for a fresh start.

67 posted on 12/23/2011 8:05:26 AM PST by Flag_This (Real presidents don't bow.)
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To: Jedidah

Definately less boring- look at all the traditions to play with. LOL


68 posted on 12/23/2011 8:22:01 AM PST by handmade
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To: Fresh Wind

It may be time to summon the ghost of Andrew Jackson.


69 posted on 12/23/2011 8:29:44 AM PST by Jay Redhawk
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To: SunkenCiv
I always suspected that the mound builders such as Cahokia represented a cultural diffusion from the pyramid builders of Meso-America (or vice versa)
70 posted on 12/23/2011 8:33:31 AM PST by BenLurkin (This is not a statement of fact. It is either opinion or satire; or both)
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To: Rembrandt

I am a mix—a mutt—Irish, English, French-Canadian, German and Italian, with just a touch of Native American (Arapaho) for spice. In short—I am an American—been here since 1720.


71 posted on 12/23/2011 9:21:12 AM PST by Forward the Light Brigade (Into the Jaws of H*ll)
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To: Will88
'Deal with the Cherokee and Creek and the tribes known to have lived in what is now the US when the settlers began arriving. '

Migration is a funny thing. The Chreokee, though famous for being in GA and NC. Like all groups, were migrants from some where else[Great Lakes].

72 posted on 12/23/2011 9:29:37 AM PST by Theoria
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To: LucyT

very interesting


73 posted on 12/23/2011 9:32:13 AM PST by americanophile ("this absurd theology of an immoral Bedouin, is a rotting corpse which poisons our lives" - Ataturk)
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To: Theoria
The Chreokee, though famous for being in GA and NC. Like all groups, were migrants from some where else[Great Lakes].

Everyone in the world is descended from migrants. But concerning the questions in this article, the descendents of the settlers and founders of the US should only deal with those native groups with legitimate claims from the time the settlers arrived, and not with a bunch of La Raza late comers who are mostly trying to justify very recent illegal entry into the US.

74 posted on 12/23/2011 10:01:51 AM PST by Will88
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To: Will88
No, I understand. Any sign of weakness to a group called ‘the race’ is a recipe for disaster.
75 posted on 12/23/2011 10:22:33 AM PST by Theoria
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To: JoeProBono
It's got a couple of openings. What you do is put gold bearing soil (or black sands, or pulverized clay sometimes) in the ball, seal it up, and a couple of guys push it around the rest of the day breaking the gold particles out of their matrix which might be quartz, iron pyrite, magnetite, clay, garbage, whatever has been identified to be gold bearing soil or "deposits".

Once you've got it broken up you run it through a water sluice so that the gold particles can drop to the bottom with the lighter stuff being washed away.

Somebody said you have to place the sluice at a 21 degree angle but I don't know.

76 posted on 12/23/2011 10:37:15 AM PST by muawiyah
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To: Fred Nerks

In between yugas there is always great geological devastation; about 200 years long. Flooding would defninitely be in the mix. And rising waters, evidenced by large stone structures underneath the sea now being found. I must check the link you sent me! I’m tried of reading about horrible world affairs.


77 posted on 12/23/2011 10:37:34 AM PST by little jeremiah (We will have to go through hell to get out of hell.)
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To: muawiyah
You ain't heavy - you're my brother - Yo


78 posted on 12/23/2011 10:49:46 AM PST by JoeProBono (A closed mouth gathers no feet - Mater tua caligas gerit)
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To: Flag_This
The intro was garbled ~ I do recall they've determined that a Bermuda High that lasted for several centuries started just about the time the Maya moved away/starved/suffered a very severe reproductive bottleneck/etc. That created an immense drought in much of the Yucatan.

When there's a Bermuda High off the coast the Washington DC area becomes unsufferable. you end up with HIGH HUMIDITY and NO RAIN. I remember the Summer of 1975 ~ UNREAL!!!

79 posted on 12/23/2011 10:51:01 AM PST by muawiyah
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To: BenLurkin

Cahokia may well have been initiated by Chinese adventurers ~ in the late 1300s or there abouts. Most of the structure dates from the 1500s.


80 posted on 12/23/2011 10:53:27 AM PST by muawiyah
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To: JoeProBono

http://dovells.net/dick/links/hornetballs.jpg Check this Joe. http://dovells.net/dick/links/goldmine.html


81 posted on 12/23/2011 10:58:41 AM PST by muawiyah
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To: muawiyah


82 posted on 12/23/2011 11:01:50 AM PST by JoeProBono (A closed mouth gathers no feet - Mater tua caligas gerit)
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To: MCF; SunkenCiv; no-to-illegals; decimon; All

Maybe the valleys were already occupied by indigenous people, or perhaps any leaders/rulers who arrive first usurped them, and rather than fight over them, the Maya commoners chose to terrace and irrigate which they knew how to do well. One comment was that a word for house was common to the Indians living there now and to the Maya. That word seems to be similar to a word used by the Seminole Indians which I think is chikee (sp?).


83 posted on 12/23/2011 11:22:35 AM PST by gleeaikin
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To: kelly4c
I wouldn’t say “Eurotrash”..but European mutts

Both terms..."trash", and "mutts"...are unneccessarily derogatory.

84 posted on 12/23/2011 11:55:37 AM PST by DNA.2012
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To: muawiyah
"That created an immense drought in much of the Yucatan."

I've heard/read that severe drought may have helped end Tikal and Copan, but at the same time that they were declining, cities like Chichen Itza were becoming more powerful. The thing is, I thought the northern part of the Yucatan, where Chichen Itza is located, is drier than the rest of the peninsula.

85 posted on 12/23/2011 11:57:12 AM PST by Flag_This (Real presidents don't bow.)
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To: BenLurkin

It’s not exactly architecture to dump a bunch of dirt into a pile. Cahokia has the possible purpose of staying high and dry during spring floods, but the Ohio Valley mounds are built in various animal shapes, among other things. The mounds around here were for burials, we’re told, but alas, no human remains are found in them, just pottery and whatnot. Could be that the remains just didn’t survive, but there’s not so much as a tooth, AFAIK.

The PreColumbian Americas were characterized by the same traits found throughout the world — populations boomed, populations busted, populations moved around, people killed one another.

There’s at least two distinct tribal groups in w Michigan, the better known crossed the Lake from what’s now Wisconsin sometime in the last 300 years or so. In the Upper Peninsula, an ‘indigenous’ tribe actually came from what is now upstate NY, relocating on the basis of a shaman’s vision, and when they got there, fighting the previous residents in a struggle known in their folklore as the Rice Wars (that’s the wild rice, not Asian rice).


86 posted on 12/23/2011 4:14:24 PM PST by SunkenCiv (Merry Christmas, Happy New Year! May 2013 be even Happier!)
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To: SunkenCiv


87 posted on 12/23/2011 4:21:33 PM PST by JoeProBono (A closed mouth gathers no feet - Mater tua caligas gerit)
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To: LucyT

This is an interesting supposition but there is absolutely no peer review of his thesis anywhere to be found, and the article was badly written. When the original survey was done, why did they get someone from South Africa, for crying out loud, instead of a Mexican Mayanist? I would like to see something more competently done regarding this possible interpretation. And the commenters on the original site are waaaay out there anti-American nut jobs for the most part.


88 posted on 12/23/2011 6:36:30 PM PST by La Lydia
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To: Rebelbase

Nah, your Celt from the British Isles precludes that, not that the Scotch-Irish (and thank you by the way for spelling it correctly, “Scots-Irish” just grates on me) are looked upon in any better light outside the south and midwest, lol.


89 posted on 12/23/2011 6:45:40 PM PST by RegulatorCountry
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To: Forward the Light Brigade

“I am a mix—a mutt—Irish, English, French-Canadian, German and Italian, with just a touch of Native American (Arapaho) for spice. In short—I am an American—been here since 1720.”

Damn, that’s a long time; you were more than 200 years old when Sociable Security came in. You had to wait a long time for that.


90 posted on 12/23/2011 8:15:32 PM PST by Rembrandt (.. AND the donkey you rode in on.)
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To: DNA.2012

Maybe in your eyes, but I don’t find it derogatory. Besides even if it was it’s self-depracating. Which is usually viewed as OK. People are too touchy. Mutt simply means a mixture of nationalities. If you know of a different meaning then you can enlighten this ignoramus.


91 posted on 12/24/2011 9:07:07 PM PST by kelly4c
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To: LucyT; Renfield; gleeaikin; blam

additional — Daniels states that he’d reached the same conclusion independently.

Has an 1100 year old Mayan site been discovered in the Georgia mountains?
Gary Daniels, Atlanta Road Trip Travel Examiner
December 23, 2011
http://www.examiner.com/road-trip-travel-in-atlanta/has-an-1100-year-old-mayan-site-been-discovered-the-georgia-mountains


92 posted on 12/27/2011 4:28:53 AM PST by SunkenCiv (Merry Christmas, Happy New Year! May 2013 be even Happier!)
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To: LucyT
A follow up is out:

More evidence of the Maya in Georgia

93 posted on 12/29/2011 8:58:52 PM PST by Theoria
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To: Theoria; SunkenCiv; smokingfrog; radu; Southack; La Lydia; crazyhorse691; Georgia Girl 2; ...

.

Ping

for a follow-up.

Check out Link at # 93.

Thanks Theoria.


94 posted on 12/29/2011 10:22:41 PM PST by LucyT
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To: LucyT; Theoria
excellent follow up, thanks:

In fact, researcher Douglas Peck has noted that when Spanish explorer Ponce de Leon encountered the indigenous people of south Florida they were not only aware of the Yucatan peninsula and the civilizations that existed there but were able to give him exact navigational headings by which to reach it. This would only be possible if there had been contact between the Yucatan and Florida.

95 posted on 12/29/2011 10:48:03 PM PST by Fred Nerks (FAIR DINKUM!)
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To: LucyT; Theoria; SunkenCiv

Thanks for the ping, LucyT.
And thanks for posting that link, SunkenCiv & Theoria.

Lotsa links to follow up on in the article so it’s saved in Faves for further perusal. Very interesting stuff. I’m champin’ at the bit for a road trip!


96 posted on 12/30/2011 12:35:23 AM PST by radu (May God watch over our troops and keep them safe)
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