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They that go down to sea in ships
YOUTUBE ^ | Jan 09,2012 | swampsniper

Posted on 01/08/2012 10:24:48 PM PST by SWAMPSNIPER

They that go down to sea in ships, that do business in great waters: These see the works of the Lord, and his wonders in the deep.

107th Psalm


TOPICS: Arts/Photography; Miscellaneous; Outdoors
KEYWORDS: ocean; ship; storm
A friend sent me this link tonight. Without getting wet it does a great job of renewing old memories for me.
1 posted on 01/08/2012 10:24:53 PM PST by SWAMPSNIPER
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To: lawnguy; pandoraou812; Daffynition; barker; ferri; gjeiii; genefromjersey; texas booster; ...

pinglist


2 posted on 01/08/2012 10:27:37 PM PST by SWAMPSNIPER (The Second Amendment, a Matter of Fact, Not a Matter of Opinion)
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To: lawnguy; pandoraou812; Daffynition; barker; ferri; gjeiii; genefromjersey; texas booster; ...

pinglist


3 posted on 01/08/2012 10:29:36 PM PST by SWAMPSNIPER (The Second Amendment, a Matter of Fact, Not a Matter of Opinion)
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To: SWAMPSNIPER

I you’ve never experienced a storm at sea, this YouTube video will give you an idea of what it’s like. Once you’re in a storm like this, you just pray that everything keeps working and the people who built your ship knew what they were doing (and over built it for extra life insurance).

There’s no place to run and no way to hide from a storm — you just ride it out. I’ve been there, done that. I don’t want to do it again any time soon.


4 posted on 01/08/2012 10:43:05 PM PST by MasterGunner01 (11)
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To: MasterGunner01

I fished for snapper in a 32 footer built on a Greek sponge boat hull design . We messed around in 1961 and had to ride out most of Hurricane Esther at sea. We got 90 knots of wind and 36 foot seas. It’s not something you forget.


5 posted on 01/08/2012 10:50:33 PM PST by SWAMPSNIPER (The Second Amendment, a Matter of Fact, Not a Matter of Opinion)
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To: MasterGunner01

Caught between two typhoons in the PAC on Independence we took whitewater over the bow - had to pull my forward lookouts in even though they were tied down they were getting pummeled all to hell.

Wind picked up to 80 kts from 20 so fast they didn’t have time to fold the blades on the rescue helo - so when the wind hit 120 it folded the front blade for us straight back over the top.

One of the Japanese destroyers with us lost their mast - whole antenna structure thing whoosh gone. One of our boys sonar dome was destroyed and another escort lost a radar. This would’ve been ‘93 I think maybe early ‘94.

She’s beautiful but when the dander is up watch out boys she’s not to be taken lightly


6 posted on 01/08/2012 10:57:50 PM PST by reed13k (For evil to triumph it is only necessary for good men to do nothing.)
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To: reed13k

Saw the same thing on the Indy while we were in the No Atlantic. Tore up our starboard forward sponson.


7 posted on 01/08/2012 11:08:30 PM PST by BMWR1200C
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To: SWAMPSNIPER
Thank you SWAMPSNIPER, for all your wonderful photos in the past, for for this jaw-dropping video tonight.

That is some mind-boggling footage. God bless and preserve those who brave the seas.

8 posted on 01/08/2012 11:15:29 PM PST by dayglored (Listen, strange women lying in ponds distributing swords is no basis for a system of government!)
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To: SWAMPSNIPER

Somebody owes me a new keyboard - and carpet!

Amazing shots. Amazing how the shots are so smooth considering many were taken from a nearby ship in such heavy seas.

“Okay, I know you won’t be able to see me, but I’ll be in the swell just ahead of you. Try not to run into us.”


9 posted on 01/08/2012 11:39:54 PM PST by 21twelve
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To: SWAMPSNIPER

Call me Ishmael. Some years ago — never mind how long precisely — having little or no money in my purse, and nothing particular to interest me on shore, I thought I would sail about a little and see the watery part of the world. It is a way I have of driving off the spleen and regulating the circulation. Whenever I find myself growing grim about the mouth; whenever it is a damp, drizzly November in my soul; whenever I find myself involuntarily pausing before coffin warehouses, and bringing up the rear of every funeral I meet; and especially whenever my hypos get such an upper hand of me, that it requires a strong moral principle to prevent me from deliberately stepping into the street, and methodically knocking people’s hats off—then, I account it high time to get to sea as soon as I can. This is my substitute for pistol and ball. With a philosophical flourish Cato throws himself upon his sword; I quietly take to the ship.


10 posted on 01/08/2012 11:58:30 PM PST by mylife (The Roar Of The Masses Could Be Farts)
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To: MasterGunner01

Well there’s plenty to think about and do whilst “riding it out,” but the problem is it takes five hundred times longer and seems to average 1.5 personal injuries per task!

No room for tall tales when you’re looking at the actual footage. A fellow - a relatively new sailor - the other day was telling me how he was in “sustained sixty knot winds” for almost two days. I’ve been in some heavy stuff but that kind of weather is the stuff of the roaring 40s and BIG, rare storms.

Just for kicks I checked his dates and location. He was off by, oh, more than half.

I’ve heard more tall tales about weather and waves than I have about fish!


11 posted on 01/09/2012 12:01:14 AM PST by golux
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To: SWAMPSNIPER

I do believe this link will be stolen. Borrowed. For my homepage... :)

That was magnificent...thanks, SWAMPSNIPER...!!


12 posted on 01/09/2012 12:45:30 AM PST by Bradís Gramma
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To: SWAMPSNIPER
"..a great job of renewing old memories.."

The sea in that clip was mild by comparison to what I went through (twice) in the Atlantic aboard a destroyer (USS English) that ran into two hurricanes a couple of years apart.

We found ourselves in the 'eye' (guessing 10-12 miles across) of the second, an extremely eerie sight, relatively calm seas, and a giant whirling wall of clouds all around us, extending thousands of feet above. The captain steamed along keeping us in the middle for a bit, told everyone to take a look, because we had to turn to stay with the rest of the HK group.

That storm ripped the depth-charge racks off the fantail, tore the steam torpedo mount off the 02 deck, ripped off all lifeboats, and tore the 'breakwater' fairing off both sides of the ship - literally tore half-inch steel plate as if it were paper. We lost one screw, a radar antenna, and several smaller radio antenna. Many thought there was no way we could survive - but we did. We were five-six months in dry-dock afterward for repairs.

13 posted on 01/09/2012 1:48:54 AM PST by Ron C.
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To: SWAMPSNIPER

I need dramamine!


14 posted on 01/09/2012 2:17:29 AM PST by afraidfortherepublic
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To: SWAMPSNIPER

Awesome video, Swampsniper!


15 posted on 01/09/2012 3:12:07 AM PST by momtothree
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To: SWAMPSNIPER

That was good.


16 posted on 01/09/2012 4:30:31 AM PST by Lady Lucky (It's an equine thing.)
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To: golux
The OIC of PTF-18 had come to us from the USS AGERHOLM (DD-826). As a LTjg, he was aboard the destroyer when, thanks to a screw-up by the fleet meteorologist, the ship got vectored directly into the path of Typhoon Joan in 1970. [AGERHOLM was sailing from the Gun Line off the coast of South Viet Nam to the Philippines for an upkeep period.]

He wrote a description of the storm for the ships cruise book and it was memorable. During the storm some really strange (and funny) things happened. At the time of the storm, DD-826 had a couple of Vietnamese officers aboard for shipboard training. They came away from that training cruise convinced that all Americans were totally crazy.

17 posted on 01/09/2012 4:33:42 AM PST by MasterGunner01 (11)
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To: BMWR1200C

I seem to have heard something about that - That sponson was just across the forecastle from my office....never liked that office - it was in the exact spot all the OODs were recommended to take damage if we had to - as it would best allow air ops to continue without loss of other activities.


18 posted on 01/09/2012 5:11:07 AM PST by reed13k (For evil to triumph it is only necessary for good men to do nothing.)
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To: momtothree

Great video Swampsniper!

That North Atlantic can be cold and rough!

I would not have wanted to have been on that ship!
Especially on the wheel or in the engine room keeping the power plant running. If you lose power in seas like that you are dead.


19 posted on 01/09/2012 5:17:34 AM PST by Uncle Lonny
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To: SWAMPSNIPER

My Dad went through a few of those.

He went to sea at the age of nine in the Gloucester Fishing Fleet.


20 posted on 01/09/2012 5:18:32 AM PST by left that other site
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To: SWAMPSNIPER
My father was the helmsman on a destroyer escort in WW11 in the Pacific, he saw lots of action but steering through a really bad typhoon seemed to of ranked right up there with the near miss from the submarine's torpedo, the beach landing and the cliff guns opening up on the ship behind them. I thought he was exaggerating the size of the waves which he said were like mountains when I was a little kid. I saw that typhoon he talked about on the history channel once, it looked pretty extreme and I realized he was not telling tales. Actually it might of been that story that had made me want to go talk to the Army recruiters rather then the Navy guys, I get seasick at mere choppy, he was a better man then I.
21 posted on 01/09/2012 5:40:15 AM PST by dog breath
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To: SWAMPSNIPER

I was behind the door when God gave out the guts required to face conditions like those.


22 posted on 01/09/2012 5:45:05 AM PST by Clara Lou (nObama, noRomney, noPaul, noBachmann, noSantorum . . .)
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To: Ron C.

“That storm ripped the depth-charge racks off the fantail, tore the steam torpedo mount off the 02 deck, ripped off all lifeboats, and tore the ‘breakwater’ fairing off both sides of the ship - literally tore half-inch steel plate as if it were paper. We lost one screw, a radar antenna, and several smaller radio antenna. Many thought there was no way we could survive - but we did.”

Yep, that video was no hurricane. Judging from the white caps just a strong gale.

I was on the EDGE of a typhoon in 69 on a C-3 freighter in the South China Sea in seas like that. All we could do is stay in place and keep the bow headed into the seas for over 12 hours. Kinda scary.

Everyone was mad at the captain for choosing to try to beat the storm by routing us in the most direct line to Yokohama.

We left Da Nang before the ship has been secured for sea and were trying to drop the booms into the cradles on a rolling deck outside of the harbor. Good thing the Bosun knew his stuff!

Hit some really rough seas later returning to CONUS on the Great Circle Route in the North Pacific too. The third mate made us stand bow watch on the flying bridge. Bout froze my azz off.

What a long strange trip that was.

Ah memories, memories!

The older I gets, the better I wuz


23 posted on 01/09/2012 5:47:17 AM PST by Uncle Lonny
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To: dog breath
Visibility was so bad I had to haul myself out on deck and lash myself to the sampson post, the skipper couldn't see much from the pilot house.

If I didn't keep my lips tight my cheeks would inflate like balloons.

There were times when I was completely submerged.

You can't let fear lock you up, that is the surest way to die.

24 posted on 01/09/2012 5:47:52 AM PST by SWAMPSNIPER (The Second Amendment, a Matter of Fact, Not a Matter of Opinion)
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To: SWAMPSNIPER

As a child, I swam in the ocean (usually not past waist depth.) As it was, I got tossed around like a piece of styrofoam. I can’t imagine going through a hurricane. Undertow alone induces a deep respect for nature.


25 posted on 01/09/2012 8:00:16 AM PST by Silentgypsy (If this creature is not stopped it could make its way to Novosibirsk!)
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To: SWAMPSNIPER

Thanks
I was caught out in my 25’ sailboat. Pretty heavy summer storms. No fun but nothing like these.


26 posted on 01/09/2012 2:47:29 PM PST by Vinnie
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To: SWAMPSNIPER

I was always good until she starts a shuttering, then the bad feelings start.


27 posted on 01/09/2012 2:58:59 PM PST by central_va ( I won't be reconstructed and I do not give a damn.)
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