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How long do TVs last? (HDTV's)
cnet.com ^ | February 23, 2012 | Geoffrey Morrison

Posted on 02/26/2012 2:33:37 AM PST by Las Vegas Dave

One reader asked about the lifespan of modern televisions, but first we need to discuss what manufacturers mean by "lifespan."

CNET Reader Dadar asks:

Are the "lifespan" claims by manufacturers proper? I've read numbers ranging from 50,000 hours to 100,000 hours, often with plasma TVs at the higher end of that scale compared to LED and CCFL LCDs.

I would have thought, being solid-state devices, light emitting diodes would have had a greater lifespan than their fluorescent counterparts. Hearsay also puts plasma at the bottom, but numbers I've found show the opposite? Are any of these true?

All claims by manufacturers should be taken with a grain of salt, but you pose an excellent question.

The first thing we need to discuss is what manufacturers mean by "lifespan." This doesn't mean that after a certain amount of use, the TV will just stop working. This rating has nothing to do with parts or warranty coverage. Most manufacturers don't even mention lifespan on their Web sites.

What they're talking about is brightness. The generally accepted method for measuring lifespan is the number of hours of use until the TV is half as bright as it was when new ("half brightness"). The TV is still watchable, it's just not as bright. Nearly all new TVs are very bright, so they'll largely be watchable at the end of their "lifespan" ratings, assuming no other issues.

The fact is this: all TVs get dimmer with age. How many years it will take before it's unwatchable depends on a lot of factors. A few generalizations can be made, though. For one, the brighter the TV, the shorter its life. Turning down the TV's backlight control, or turning down the contrast control on a plasma, will extend its life (and lower your electric bill). Will watching a dim TV give you mediocre enjoyment for 30 years? Probably not, but it will help.

What's the longest lasting TV tech? Hard to say. Plasmas are often the only technology that even lists lifespan, and this is almost always a claimed 100,000 hours. The florescent lamps in CCFL-based LCDs age just like any other florescent lamp, and I've seen them rated for 30,000 to 60,000 hours (sometimes more). The "white" LEDs used in LED LCDs will also dim over time. There is little published data on LED lifespan (as in, the companies aren't talking), but it's assumed to be similar to CCFLs.

As far as the long awaited OLED TVs hopefully out later this year, there's no hard numbers, either. However, blue LED longevity was always a major factor holding back the technology (as in blue dimmed faster than red and green). In talking with OLED manufacturers, I've been told that blue lifespan is now in line with other TV technologies, which is why we're seeing OLED TVs now instead of five years ago.

What do these numbers mean? Well if we go with these numbers (all we have, at the moment), and you watch 5 hours of TV every day, a plasma will reach half brightness in around 54 years. Even the lower rating on LCDs would mean 16 years before half brightness. If you watch more TV than that, well, the math is pretty easy. Even running 24 hours a day, you're still looking at more than 10 years with a plasma till half-brightness.

To be fair, each technology ages differently, and not entirely equally. CNET TV reviewer David Katzmeier is doing longevity testing with plasmas, with interesting results. There have been reports of some LED LCDs experiencing a color shift as they age. There are multiple CCFLs in LCDs that use them, and while they're likely to age in a similar fashion, it's possible they won't, leading to dim areas of the screen (horizontally). But again, we're talking many, many years of use before this is even a possibility.

Keep in mind that with LCDs, what's aging is the backlight (both CCFL and LED). In extreme cases, the LCD layer itself can age, but it's largely the backlight that's the issue. Technically, you can replace the backlight of an LCD, but I dare anyone to prove that this is remotely cost effective. You're better off just buying a new TV.

And that, as much as it's sure to anger many, is the overriding advice here. Plasmas and LCDs are reliable and long-lived. Will they last as long as that ancient console CRT you've had in the basement since the '70s? Maybe, maybe not, but why would you want them to? Ten years ago, flat-panel TVs were incredibly expensive and looked like crap. Today, they're cheap and gorgeous. Imagine what amazing 70-inch 4K OLED you'll be able to buy 10 years from now. TVs get larger, cheaper, and better every year. So even if your TV "only" lasts seven years, you'll be able to replace it for far less money than you paid for it with something that performs even better.

In other words, don't worry about lifespan.


TOPICS: Miscellaneous; Music/Entertainment; TV/Movies
KEYWORDS: hdtv

1 posted on 02/26/2012 2:33:38 AM PST by Las Vegas Dave
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To: ADemocratNoMore; advertising guy; aft_lizard; AJMaXx; Alice in Wonderland; american colleen; ...

HDTV pings!

Interested in the HDTV ping list?
Please Freepmail me(freepmail works best)if you would like your name added to the HDTV ping list,(approximately 375 freepers are currently on the HDTV ping list).
The pinged subjects can be HDTV technology, satellite, cable, and OTA HD reception (Over The Air with roof top or indoor antennas), Broadcast specials, Sports, Blu Ray/HDDVD, and any and all subjects relating to HDTV.

LVD

Note: if you search Freerepublic using the keyword "HDTV”, you will find most of the past HDTV postings.


2 posted on 02/26/2012 2:34:59 AM PST by Las Vegas Dave ("All 57 or is it 58 states must stand together and defeat O-bozo. VOTE HIM OUT!!")
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To: Las Vegas Dave

BONUS article for the ping list.

Over-the-Air TV Catches Second Wind, Aided by Web

It’s cool to have rabbit ears again.

Largely relegated to obscurity decades ago, old-fashioned television broadcasts—over the airwaves and not via cable or satellite—are enjoying an unexpected revival in the digital era.

With an increased array of online-video programming now drawing viewers’ attention, companies are starting to pitch consumers on complementing online video streamed from the Web with broadcast-TV signals as a way to save money on cable subscriptions.

If it gains traction, this trend could undercut part of the rationale for selling off TV spectrum in voluntary auctions, approved by Congress on Friday, aimed at freeing up spectrum for wireless broadband.

There are signs that consumers are responding. TV-antenna seller Richard Schneider of St. Louis says sales at his company are soaring. Mr. Schneider’s Antennas Direct sold 70,000 antennas in January, and he expects to double last year’s sales of about 600,000. That was up from 400,000 antennas in 2010.

< snip - click on the below link >
http://moneyland.time.com/2012/02/21/the-return-of-television-rabbit-ears/


3 posted on 02/26/2012 2:55:20 AM PST by Las Vegas Dave ("All 57 or is it 58 states must stand together and defeat O-bozo. VOTE HIM OUT!!")
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To: Las Vegas Dave

These days, engineering timed obsolescence into devices and products is a highly specialised operation. Ever notice that bright pink substrate under metallic-looking phones? That is done to stand out as the products experiences wear with use, making it appear visibly obsolete within a certain time span. Likewise, components are made to partially fail over time so that consumers replace the products using them with new ones. Companies produce new models so frequently these days, such practices are important to pay for R&D cycles.


4 posted on 02/26/2012 3:16:25 AM PST by James C. Bennett (An Australian.)
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To: Las Vegas Dave

They last until they break.


5 posted on 02/26/2012 4:05:54 AM PST by org.whodat (Sorry bill, I should never have made all those jokes about you and Lewinsky, have fun.)
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To: Las Vegas Dave

I was part of a team that automated Samsung’s LCD manufacturing facility. They ran us through a brief course on how they are manufactured and yes, they do have a ‘lifetime’. The article explains it fairly well.


6 posted on 02/26/2012 4:18:49 AM PST by Peter from Rutland
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To: Las Vegas Dave

7 posted on 02/26/2012 4:44:14 AM PST by JoeProBono (A closed mouth gathers no feet - Mater tua caligas gerit ;-{)
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To: Las Vegas Dave

Wow. That’s a whole lotta words just to say “beats me.”


8 posted on 02/26/2012 4:47:08 AM PST by Pravious
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To: Las Vegas Dave

I watch on my Toshiba TV—vintage 1992...still great.


9 posted on 02/26/2012 4:58:19 AM PST by Recovering Ex-hippie (NEWT in 2012)
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To: All
LED TV engineering life is 32 years
10 posted on 02/26/2012 5:03:42 AM PST by bmwcyle (I am ready to serve Jesus on Earth because the GOP failed again)
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To: Las Vegas Dave
My 2009 Sony 52 inch LCD lasted 15 months. Got an estimate to repair to replace the panel. It was $500 over the cost of the TV, provided they could get a panel. I was lucky I paid for the TV with a credit card. The credit card company extended the warranty by a year, and I got about a 90% refund.
11 posted on 02/26/2012 5:10:52 AM PST by Bruce Kurtz
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To: Pravious

“Wow. That’s a whole lotta words just to say “beats me.””

Yeah, for sure. However, I noticed that DLP technology wasn’t mentioned in this thread. I own a DLP and the bulb went bad after five years. So, bought a new bulb, popped a panel on the side of the tv and swapped out old bulb with new buld and was back to 100% brightness and good to go. Course, new DLP tv’s are becoming a rare bird to find anymore. Oh well....


12 posted on 02/26/2012 5:13:19 AM PST by snoringbear (Government is the Pimp,)
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To: Las Vegas Dave

After much bally-hoo my rural area replaced their analog signals ...Where I received every available network NBC,ABC,CBS from locat afilliates with no problem. Then after purchasing three HDTV sets and setting them up. And for about alomost a year received their signals no-problema...Then they moved their antenna array. Today and for the past 3 years those HDTV sets are setting there collecting dust.. I rely on am radio


13 posted on 02/26/2012 5:30:43 AM PST by mosesdapoet ("The best way to punish a country is let professors run it. Fredrick the Great p/p)
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To: Bruce Kurtz

Our first Sharp 42” is still working ten years after we bought it.


14 posted on 02/26/2012 5:47:43 AM PST by Eric in the Ozarks (Beware the Sweater Vest)
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To: Las Vegas Dave

15 posted on 02/26/2012 5:48:51 AM PST by JoeProBono (A closed mouth gathers no feet - Mater tua caligas gerit ;-{)
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To: Las Vegas Dave

The information that you are looking for is “mean time between failures”. (MTBF). When you know it, you will know how long 95% of the devices will still be working. Five per cent will have failed in that time period. If the MTBF is 9500 hours, after that time 95% of the devices will still be working and 5% will have failed.


16 posted on 02/26/2012 5:54:33 AM PST by Citizen Tom Paine (An old sailor sends)
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To: Las Vegas Dave
Technically, you can replace the backlight of an LCD, but I dare anyone to prove that this is remotely cost effective. You're better off just buying a new TV.

I bought a Samsung 63" LCD five years ago and the picture was getting dimmer so we bought a new light bulb and I installed it {very simple to do}.

The original TV cost $2110 {including tax} and the replacement light bulb cost $145 {including tax and shipping} which is about 7% of the original price.

If it costs $145 every five years to make the TV perform as if it is new, I think it is cost justified.

If the same thing happens 5 years from now, why wouldn't I replace a light bulb {albeit a damn bright one} instead of buying a new TV?

17 posted on 02/26/2012 6:15:40 AM PST by USS Alaska (Nuke the terrorists savages.)
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To: snoringbear
Howdy! I also have a DLP and had to replace the 100W bulb about 4 yrs ago. The original bulb was running at the brightest setting and I conclude that is why it didn't last long. I'm running the replacement bulb at a lower setting and it's doing great.

It still has a great picture that rivals the newer LCDs and Plasmas. I just wish the color wheel motor was quieter.

18 posted on 02/26/2012 6:35:35 AM PST by Errant
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To: Las Vegas Dave

Sounds like they will last until the next “Gotta get me one of those” technology breakthrough in TVs, that make all TVs before it old school. Not sure what that will be yet. Certainly not 3D. Too small of an interested market for those. But some big jump is 10 to 20 years ahead, you just know it.


19 posted on 02/26/2012 6:48:32 AM PST by NavyCanDo
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To: JoeProBono

Joe, there’s something wrong with your television. It’s all fuzzy and floppy and it tilts hard to the left.


20 posted on 02/26/2012 6:56:09 AM PST by Sirius Lee (Sofa King Mitt Odd Did Obamneycare)
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To: Las Vegas Dave

One of my big-screens is a somewhat older “rear-projection” model — it has a single bright white light, that is used to drive the display. It fades over time, and will last maybe 15,000 hours. It is however replaceable — costs around $200 bucks, but cheaper I think if I shop around.

I’ve bought 3 replacements, so I always have one around, and I’m on my 3rd bulb, so I still have one left. I’d say it lasts about 2 years per bulb, so in another year I’ll probably buy another replacement bulb, and then ditch the TV when I run out because there is better technology coming.


21 posted on 02/26/2012 7:07:54 AM PST by CharlesWayneCT
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To: Sirius Lee

Sirius Lee
Since Feb 6, 2012

Welcome NOOB
Your stay is highly speculative


22 posted on 02/26/2012 7:10:14 AM PST by JoeProBono (A closed mouth gathers no feet - Mater tua caligas gerit ;-{)
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To: Citizen Tom Paine

Intersting, I have never seen anyone actually doing this. Good to know though. My LCD is getting close to the 4 (or is it 5) year mark and I sometimes feel it is getting dimmer as well.
I might as well check out what my lightbulb would cost me and get some DIY action going.


23 posted on 02/26/2012 7:23:58 AM PST by fordD89
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To: Sirius Lee
ANY RELATION?


24 posted on 02/26/2012 7:26:16 AM PST by JoeProBono (A closed mouth gathers no feet - Mater tua caligas gerit ;-{)
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To: CharlesWayneCT

Insted of just ditching it, sell it on eBay. I’ve done that successfully with two rear projection CRT TVs.


25 posted on 02/26/2012 7:29:31 AM PST by libstripper
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To: Recovering Ex-hippie
I watch on my Toshiba TV—vintage 1992...still great.

me- 1994 Sony, 20" / 1999 Sharp 25" ... did not even bother to look at the new stuff over the years- until this past Christmas 2011-when i saw price$ drop to more normal rate of 500$ +- range. I am good to go for several more years until the new stuff drops some more. Really, the new stuff isn't that much better for the price/size selection .

26 posted on 02/26/2012 7:32:54 AM PST by urtax$@work (The only kind of memorial is a Burning memorial !)
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To: urtax$@work

My Toshiba went out about 7 years ago..the repairman came out..replaced maybe it was a “tube’ ha. Good to go.

and that TV got moved from Ohio to Fla, back to Ohio, back to Fl and then moved about 7 more times within FL...HA.

Ha. ha.


27 posted on 02/26/2012 7:39:52 AM PST by Recovering Ex-hippie (NEWT in 2012)
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To: JoeProBono
Sirius Lee
Since Feb 6, 2012
Welcome NOOB
Your stay is highly speculative

Wow, you have high standards. The new Freeper is making an anti-Romney post that's actually pretty amusing and is relevant to the thread. How long do new Freepers have to wait before this is acceptable?

28 posted on 02/26/2012 7:44:27 AM PST by ottbmare (The OTTB Mare)
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To: Las Vegas Dave

More info needed.

Do own a gun?
Do watch network news?


29 posted on 02/26/2012 7:46:08 AM PST by ThomasThomas
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To: ottbmare

ottbmare...your sign-up date is less than 5 years ago, so I believe that under rule VIII para 3, you are disallowed from questioning NOOB challenges by old-timers.

Also, I note the absence of an about page - I’m estimating a 40+% chance that you’re an Alinskyite plant.

Prepare to meet your ZOT!

(do I have to say just kidding?)


30 posted on 02/26/2012 7:53:45 AM PST by headsonpikes (Mass murder and cannibalism are the twin sacraments of socialism - "Who-whom?"-Lenin)
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To: org.whodat
They last until they break.

That was precisely the problem with my gorgeous 27 inch Sony Trinitron XBR. One thermistor failed in the 25 years I owned it and it cost only $100 to repair as good as new. I simply got tired of waiting for it to break last year and finally bought a 55 inch Panny. As we near retirement age, I'm hoping to get good life out of our two flat screens as it will become harder to replace them on a fixed "income" (if there is any income at all in this interest rate environment).

31 posted on 02/26/2012 8:00:51 AM PST by ProtectOurFreedom
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To: headsonpikes

32 posted on 02/26/2012 8:03:18 AM PST by JoeProBono (A closed mouth gathers no feet - Mater tua caligas gerit ;-{)
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To: JoeProBono

Hey, I resemble that!


33 posted on 02/26/2012 8:11:41 AM PST by headsonpikes (Mass murder and cannibalism are the twin sacraments of socialism - "Who-whom?"-Lenin)
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To: headsonpikes

34 posted on 02/26/2012 8:23:30 AM PST by JoeProBono (A closed mouth gathers no feet - Mater tua caligas gerit ;-{)
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To: JoeProBono
Welcome NOOB Your stay is highly speculative

What are you going to do? Tell on me for making fun of mittbots? Go ahead.

35 posted on 02/26/2012 9:20:15 AM PST by Sirius Lee (Sofa King Mitt Odd Did Obamneycare)
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To: Las Vegas Dave

How long the screen display and backlights will last means nothing, if the weak power supplies that manufacturers are using is entered into the equation.

I’ve only had one LCD tv so far, and it didn’t last long.

It was an “LG” 26”, bought new in March 2009. Lasted until December 2011, when one day, it just went “poof” and the screen went dark.

Took it to a local repair shop and had them look at it. Bad power supply/voltage regulator. They kept it for a while, then told me the cost would be about $260 to repair including parts and labor. Not worth it, you can buy a new, larger tv for not much more now.

So we’re back to a 25+ year-old tube tv, looking around for a new model.

I’ve heard of numerous other flat-panel sets going bad due to power supply related problems. My suggestion to the manufacturers/designers would be twofold:
1. How about an EXTERNAL power supply (like found on small electrical devices, a “power block” of some sort)? It would remove a source of heat from inside the case, and, it would be easily replaceable in the event of failure. Couple this with...
2. A “power in” port on tv’s that retain an internal power supply. If the tv experienced a power supply failure, it would be a trivial fix to simply plug in an external source of power and get your tv back, at least temporarily.

The article concludes with the line, “In other words, don’t worry about lifespan.”

2+ years of life from an LCD tv is pitiful, and simply unacceptable.


36 posted on 02/26/2012 10:02:45 AM PST by Road Glide
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To: headsonpikes

You’re right! However did you figure out that I’m just a troll from DU? ;-)

And I KNOW no one ever believes it when a Freeper says this, but I was here long before my sign-up date. I got here in 1999 or early 2000, IIRC. But I changed my ID with JimRob’s permission for security reasons.


37 posted on 02/26/2012 11:21:25 AM PST by ottbmare (The OTTB Mare)
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To: ottbmare

“You’re right! However did you figure out that I’m just a troll from DU?”

The voices tell me...;^)


38 posted on 02/26/2012 11:54:47 AM PST by headsonpikes (Mass murder and cannibalism are the twin sacraments of socialism - "Who-whom?"-Lenin)
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