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Green Beans: A Complete Planting Guide
The How Do Gardener ^ | March 3, 2012 | Rick Bickling

Posted on 03/03/2012 4:20:37 AM PST by orsonwb

Complete planting guide for Green Beans including state specific varieties, harvest dates, nutrition facts, planting, watering, fertilizing, insect and disease information...

(Excerpt) Read more at howdogardener.com ...


TOPICS: Gardening
KEYWORDS: greenbeans; planting; preppers; survival
Looks like it's time to plant green beans here in Texas. Thought gardeners might find this information helpful.
1 posted on 03/03/2012 4:20:42 AM PST by orsonwb
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To: JustaDumbBlonde

ping


2 posted on 03/03/2012 4:22:59 AM PST by stefanbatory (Insert witty tagline here)
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To: orsonwb

I never liked green beans ... ;-D


3 posted on 03/03/2012 4:27:25 AM PST by Ken522
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To: orsonwb

4 posted on 03/03/2012 4:28:28 AM PST by JoeProBono (A closed mouth gathers no feet - Mater tua caligas gerit ;-{)
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To: orsonwb
Thanks for the post. Although I do not plant green beans in my ‘zone’ until mid-May... Green beans will not survive a freeze.

What type of green beans do you plant?

5 posted on 03/03/2012 4:32:24 AM PST by Just mythoughts (Luke 17:32 Remember Lot's wife.)
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To: Just mythoughts

Chinese Long Green Beans the red seed variety.


6 posted on 03/03/2012 4:37:16 AM PST by A. Morgan (Ayn Rand: "You can avoid reality, but you cannot avoid the consequences of avoiding reality.")
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To: A. Morgan
Chinese Long Green Beans the red seed variety.

Is this a 'pole' variety? I have not heard of them.

7 posted on 03/03/2012 4:47:08 AM PST by Just mythoughts (Luke 17:32 Remember Lot's wife.)
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To: Just mythoughts

http://www.evergreenseeds.com/asbeanyarbea.html


8 posted on 03/03/2012 4:52:53 AM PST by A. Morgan (Ayn Rand: "You can avoid reality, but you cannot avoid the consequences of avoiding reality.")
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To: orsonwb

Still too early here in NJ - normally plant mid April
to early May depending on weather.

I normally watch weather and wait until night temps dont
go below 40 F

Wintwer been real mild so may plant earlier around April 1


9 posted on 03/03/2012 4:55:44 AM PST by njslim (St)
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To: A. Morgan
Thank you for the link. Ah, the yard long beans. Personally, I like ‘Jade’, Purple beans, and a small variety called French Filet. I have not yet made up my mind which type I will plant this year.

http://www.tastefulgarden.com/store/pc/Beans-French-filet-18p120.htm

10 posted on 03/03/2012 5:00:55 AM PST by Just mythoughts (Luke 17:32 Remember Lot's wife.)
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To: Ken522

I don’t like canned ones, but fresh are a different story, of course they have to be seasoned with bacon or other pork season.


11 posted on 03/03/2012 5:05:47 AM PST by rightly_dividing (You cannot put a gun rack in a Volt !)
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To: Ken522

I pity you.

Give them another try with onion, bacon, red pepper and a little vinegar for seasoning - mmm, mmm, go-o-od!


12 posted on 03/03/2012 5:24:13 AM PST by WorkingClassFilth (I'm for Churchill in 1940!)
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To: orsonwb

My favorites are the pinto beans, picked and cooked whole in the pod. VIrtually same thing as Italian green beens, and superior taste to pole or bush beans. Also produces faster, I think.


13 posted on 03/03/2012 5:41:40 AM PST by texas_mrs
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To: orsonwb

My dad just pulls out his almanac every year and follows it. He has a decent crop of everything he plants.


14 posted on 03/03/2012 6:02:28 AM PST by rfreedom4u (Just because someone thinks it's a good idea doesn't make it legal.)
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To: Ken522

Yeah, I was thinking, “but if you plant them, don’t you stand a good chance of getting green beans”? So, to be safe, I just won’t plant them. But my tomatoes, zucchini, and jalapenos look good already.


15 posted on 03/03/2012 6:05:44 AM PST by SuzyQue
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To: Diana in Wisconsin; gardengirl; girlangler; SunkenCiv; HungarianGypsy; Gabz; billhilly; Alkhin; ...
Photobucket

Ping to the Weekly Gardening Thread Member List

Please let me know if you would like to be added to or removed from the ping list.

16 posted on 03/03/2012 6:36:27 AM PST by JustaDumbBlonde (Don't wish doom on your enemies ... plan it.)
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To: orsonwb

/mark


17 posted on 03/03/2012 6:54:22 AM PST by KoRn (Department of Homeland Security, Certified - "Right Wing Extremist")
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To: Ken522

“I never liked green beans ...”

Try these with melted butter and toasted almond slivers:

http://www.vegetablegardener.com/item/5627/how-to-grow-fine-tender-filet-beans


18 posted on 03/03/2012 7:03:11 AM PST by SumProVita (Cogito, ergo...Sum Pro Vita. (Modified Decartes))
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To: orsonwb

Thank you for posting this.


19 posted on 03/03/2012 7:04:26 AM PST by Altariel ("Curse your sudden but inevitable betrayal!")
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To: orsonwb

TOP CROP grow well around here. Tasty. Especially when cooked in bacon grease. Ya, I know. Watch out for the food police...


20 posted on 03/03/2012 7:19:17 AM PST by donozark (A soldier lives as long as he is remembered...)
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To: WorkingClassFilth

“Give them another try with onion, bacon, red pepper and a little vinegar for seasoning - mmm, mmm, go-o-od!”

If you have to put all of that in to make beans palatable, why not skip all the work of growing them and just eat the onion, bacon, red pepper and a little vinegar for seasoning?


21 posted on 03/03/2012 7:37:04 AM PST by Kirkwood (Zombie Hunter)
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To: orsonwb; All

Anyone here save seeds? Just finished reading a book on seed saving and cannot believe how complicated it sounds!


22 posted on 03/03/2012 7:42:16 AM PST by MiddleEarth (With hope or without hope we'll follow the trail of our enemies. Woe to them, if we prove the faster)
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To: Kirkwood

A restaurant in my town serves them fried in a seasoned batter as an appetizer. They are absolutely delicious...


23 posted on 03/03/2012 8:01:37 AM PST by david069
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To: MiddleEarth; JustaDumbBlonde

I’m starting to learn about saving seeds and having some luck. Hopefully seed saving will be covered on one of the weekly gardening threads.


24 posted on 03/03/2012 8:13:44 AM PST by Darth Reardon (No offense to drunken sailors)
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To: JustaDumbBlonde; Kartographer

We have eight 6 x 40 foot raised garden beds with pergolas above each for hanging crops, grapes, general gardening etc .... This past winter we have been looking at how to “expand” on the space we have and considered the use of hydroponics indoors year round. Flat space at a minimum I saw this “window farming concept” of hanging hydroponics.

Any one here do such and what is best food crop to grow in em ?

http://www.wimp.com/windowfarmsproject/

Stay safe !


25 posted on 03/03/2012 8:26:14 AM PST by Squantos (Be polite. Be professional. But have a plan to kill everyone you meet)
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To: orsonwb

Here’s a fun idea I thought I’d share. We have a gazebo on our second story deck and I was inspired to grow some ‘vines’ on the vertical supports. I got some large deep pots and planted pole beans in them and set the pots at the base of the supports. Those beans just took over the gazebo and everyone loved being able to pick the ‘beans in space’ as we sat at the outdoor table. Here in Minnesota, it will be a couple of months until I can try it again. Cant wait!


26 posted on 03/03/2012 8:55:08 AM PST by mplsconservative (Impeach Obama Now!)
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To: MiddleEarth

I saved seeds from my green beans last year. It didn’t seem too complicated, not like carrots or beets. When the plants were reaching their peak production, I chose a few to stop picking from, letting the pods ripen until they turned tan. We had such a wet fall that they weren’t going to dry on the vine, so I picked the tan ones as they changed color and spread them out on newspaper to finish drying. When they were dry and brittle, I cracked the pods open and spread the seeds out for another week to make sure they were very dry, then packed in an old pill bottle with a dessicant pack.
(Actually, several pill bottles. After the plants died down there were a ton more that had ripened under the leaves out of sight, so I dried those for seed as well. I ended up with a nice pile of them!)

If you end up with too many green bean seeds, you can use them as dry shelling beans.


27 posted on 03/03/2012 9:18:56 AM PST by Ellendra ("It's astounding how often people mistake their own stupidity for a lack of fairness." --Thunt)
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To: JustaDumbBlonde; fanfan

This is wonderful! Green beans are a staple in our family.


28 posted on 03/03/2012 9:35:57 AM PST by Silentgypsy
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To: Ellendra

Interesting. I’m thinking of just starting small and saving some tomato seeds and maybe green beans.

Did you worry about cross-pollination? Not only do you have to be concerned about plants from the same species crossing but also neighbors’ plants and sometimes up to 3 miles away! That is so extreme. I don’t know how anyone could do it.


29 posted on 03/03/2012 9:52:26 AM PST by MiddleEarth (With hope or without hope we'll follow the trail of our enemies. Woe to them, if we prove the faster)
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To: Darth Reardon

That would be great. I hope so too.


30 posted on 03/03/2012 9:53:57 AM PST by MiddleEarth (With hope or without hope we'll follow the trail of our enemies. Woe to them, if we prove the faster)
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To: JustaDumbBlonde; AdmSmith; AnonymousConservative; Berosus; bigheadfred; Bockscar; ColdOne; ...

Thanks JaDB, seems like a good day to plant some seeds. Indoors of course...


31 posted on 03/03/2012 9:55:52 AM PST by SunkenCiv (FReep this FReepathon!)
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To: Ellendra

I always grow “Contender” green beans every year, and your saving technique sounds similar to mine. Has always worked well.


32 posted on 03/03/2012 10:06:31 AM PST by SelmaLee
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To: orsonwb

I’m ready to put in the entire garden after the 15th of March. Given the mild winter this year, that’s the safe planting date.


33 posted on 03/03/2012 10:53:24 AM PST by Sarajevo (Money cannot buy happiness, but it's more comfortable to cry in a Mercedes than on a bicycle.)
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To: Kirkwood

That’s just to bring the weak-kneed into the fold. Once you get em there, you can work toward butter, salt and pepper and, finally, right off the vine/bush.


34 posted on 03/03/2012 11:02:50 AM PST by WorkingClassFilth (I'm for Churchill in 1940!)
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To: MiddleEarth

Beans are pretty easy and will stay true to their genetics without much bother, Other stuff, like corn, runs out pretty quickly and needs special precautions. Some books are pretty simple (and sometimes inaccurate) but others do a good job of guiding people through difficult methods to preserve genetic purity of the seed. The best treatment of seed saving I know of is this book:

Seed To Seed - Seed Saving and Growing Techniques for Vegetable Gardeners
Susanne Ashworth
Seed Savers Exchange, 2002

Most good OP seed catalogs now carry this title. If not, I’m sure Amazon does.


35 posted on 03/03/2012 11:09:41 AM PST by WorkingClassFilth (I'm for Churchill in 1940!)
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To: Darth Reardon; MiddleEarth
"Hopefully seed saving will be covered on one of the weekly gardening threads."

A link to some pretty good info on seed saving can be found in our 1/13/2012 thread: Weekly Gardening Thread (Seeds) Vol. 2, January 13, 2012, and the thread itself may contain info from other members.

I'd be happy to do a thread devoted to the subject in the future. Don't ever hesitate to make requests on anything that would be of interest ... your feedback is very much appreciated!

36 posted on 03/03/2012 11:25:56 AM PST by JustaDumbBlonde (Don't wish doom on your enemies ... plan it.)
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To: MiddleEarth

Technically, tomatoes and green beans can cross-pollinate. Realistically, due to the way the flower is structured, it’s unlikely to happen naturally. So, as long as you started with non-hybrids, you can get pretty pure seeds without worrying about it.

Those are the exceptions, though. With most vegetables the chances of crossing are a lot higher. The plants with nice big flowers like squash, you can tape a few blossoms closed when they’re just getting ready to open, then pollinate manually. I’m afraid I don’t have much experience with saving other types of seed from smaller-blossomed plants, I’m still getting started on seed saving myself. Still hoping the watermelon seeds I saved last year are fairly pure, they were Golden Midgets, which can get hard to find sometimes because they sell out so fast.


37 posted on 03/03/2012 7:22:10 PM PST by Ellendra ("It's astounding how often people mistake their own stupidity for a lack of fairness." --Thunt)
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To: Ellendra

I should rephrase that, I didn’t mean to make it sound like beans and tomatoes could cross with each other, just that their unlikely to cross with members of the same species growing nearby.


38 posted on 03/03/2012 8:53:49 PM PST by Ellendra ("It's astounding how often people mistake their own stupidity for a lack of fairness." --Thunt)
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To: orsonwb; All

For Bush Beans I plant ‘Derby’ or ‘Jade’ (green) and I LOVE ‘Goldito’ for a skinny yellow filet bush bean.

For Pole Beans I like ‘Fortex’ and I usually plant ‘Hilda Romano’ for my pole Romano (flat) bean for fresh eating or drying.

Last year was terrible for beans, as our soil would NOT warm up. I had to re-seed 4x! But, I still had a huge crop and was picking beans well into October!

Shameless plug for my company:

http://www.jungseed.com :)


39 posted on 03/04/2012 8:00:21 AM PST by Diana in Wisconsin (I don't have 'Hobbies.' I'm developing a robust Post-Apocalyptic skill set...)
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To: orsonwb

Anybody gonna try Bush beans this year - for a little nostalgia?

Hopefully they won’t sprout a$$paper like the last batch did.
{badumpump}

Heh. Last year we planted pole beans with the sweat-corn and both did well. Gonna do it again this year.

It’s a mutually beneficial arrangement where the pole beans get something to climb on, and the nitrogen-hungry Corn benefits from the nitrate fixing legumes they’re hosting.


40 posted on 03/04/2012 10:54:40 AM PST by LomanBill (Animals! The DemocRats blew up the windmill with an Acorn!)
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To: orsonwb

My grandmother taught me to plant. She planted by the signs. She always planted white half-runner beans and the best time was to plant them on Good Friday. If not, you planted them in the arms or leg signs on the horoscope man. In fact all plants that run or climb should be planted in those signs.

Potatoes should be planted in dark nights in March.

I’ve always planted that way and it’s always came out good.


41 posted on 03/04/2012 12:43:51 PM PST by georgiabelle
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To: orsonwb

Green beans already planted and sprouting. Onions are up. Asparagus doing great, yum. Tomatos and peppers about ready to be transplanted in the garden.

Those planting by the moon can check dates at the farmers almanac site. I’m trying it this year just to see if it works any better. Anything would work better than last year when everything burned up with the heat. Blah, it was even too hot for the green beans.


42 posted on 03/05/2012 9:16:46 AM PST by bgill (Romney & Obama are both ineligible. A non-NBC GOP prez shuts down all ?s on Obama's admin)
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To: JustaDumbBlonde

What would be the one book you would recommend for a beginner gardener? I really want to start “prepping” but my husband hasn’t bought into the idea totally(not that he doesn’t believe there may be a need but he’s just overwhelmed at the thought), so I want to at least get some beginning gardening skills.
The two things I would be trying to do are 1)hopefully all heirloom seeds and 2) organic. I want to learn to do this self sustaining with as little outside aids as possible, and also with the lowest overhead.(I will have to buy some compost, etc to improve the soil). My garden will be very tiny, probably just scattered in several areas in our small yard. I’ve promised myself not to run up a huge bill as I want to start small and prove to myself I can do it before launching in a bigger way.


43 posted on 03/05/2012 9:19:16 AM PST by boxlunch
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To: boxlunch
Try one or more of these. While I haven't read them, I have read at least a dozen of the other "Dummies" books, and they have all been great.

Vegetable Gardening for Dummies

Organic Gardening for Dummies

Gardening All-in-One for Dummies (7 books in one)

It is wise to start small. Once your husband sees the reduction in your grocery bill and tastes wonderful fresh and canned veggies, he will come around.

Good luck! Always feel free to ask questions on the weekly gardening thread.

44 posted on 03/05/2012 11:13:46 AM PST by JustaDumbBlonde (Don't wish doom on your enemies ... plan it.)
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To: Diana in Wisconsin

Ah - Diana - cheesehead @ Jung’s - kewl!

We just ordered raspberry canes from your company - I have very fond memories of raspberry jam I made from canes in the backyard of my old home in Milwaukee. I hope they do well here in Charleston, SC.


45 posted on 03/05/2012 8:01:35 PM PST by ImProudToBeAnAmerican (The real problem is pResident Fail actually believes his own bullish*t.)
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To: SelmaLee
I always grow “Contender” green beans every year,

That has been my staple favorite for years too. Early and prolific producer. I'm thinking of adding flat Roma beans as a second crop this year. They have a chewier, meatier texture I find a nice change from the regular.

46 posted on 03/06/2012 6:14:55 AM PST by OB1kNOb (The prudent see danger and take refuge, but the simple keep going and pay the penalty. - Prov 22:3)
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To: OB1kNOb

Thanks - I’ll keep those in mind, if my freezer space allows :)


47 posted on 03/07/2012 9:18:18 AM PST by SelmaLee
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To: MiddleEarth
Saving beans (seed) is very easy. I just leave some on the vines at the end of the season, let them dry, and shell them.

Tomatoes are slightly more complicated. I save the seed, juice, and some pulp in a plastic cup, add some water, cover with plastic with some air holes, let ferment for a few days (outside, out of direct sun), stirring daily, until the seeds separate from the pulp. Rinse, dry on a coffee filter or paper towel. Save in a pill bottle, test tube, or similar container. Label!

Only use “heirloom”, or other “open pollinated” varieties.

48 posted on 03/12/2012 1:48:00 AM PDT by tdscpa
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To: tdscpa

Thanks for the tips!


49 posted on 03/12/2012 8:59:24 AM PDT by MiddleEarth (With hope or without hope we'll follow the trail of our enemies. Woe to them, if we prove the faster)
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