Free Republic
Browse · Search
General/Chat
Topics · Post Article

Skip to comments.

Astronomy Picture of the Day -- Lick Observatory Moonrise
NASA ^ | March 10, 2012 | (see photo credit)

Posted on 03/10/2012 9:36:43 AM PST by SunkenCiv

Explanation: As viewed from a well chosen location at sunset, the gorgeous Full Moon rose behind Mount Hamilton, east of San Jose, California on March 7. The lunar disk frames historic Lick Observatory perched on the mountain's 4,200 foot summit. Both observatory and Moon echo the warm color of sunlight (moonlight is reflected sunlight) filtered by a long path through the atmosphere. Substantial atmospheric refraction contributes the Moon's ragged, green rim. Of course, the March Full Moon is also known as the Full Worm Moon. In the telescopic photo, Lick's 40 inch Nickel Telescope dome is on the left. The large dome on the right houses Lick's Great 36 inch Refractor.

March 10, 2012

(Excerpt) Read more at 129.164.179.22 ...


TOPICS: Astronomy; Astronomy Picture of the Day; Science
KEYWORDS: apod; astronomy; science
[Credit & Copyright: Rick Baldridge]

1 posted on 03/10/2012 9:36:46 AM PST by SunkenCiv
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | View Replies]

To: brytlea; cripplecreek; decimon; bigheadfred; KoRn; Grammy; married21; steelyourfaith; Mmogamer; ...

2 posted on 03/10/2012 9:39:14 AM PST by SunkenCiv (I come to bury Caesar, not to praise him)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | View Replies]

To: SunkenCiv

Very beautiful....thanks!


3 posted on 03/10/2012 9:43:03 AM PST by illiac (If we don't change directions soon, we'll get where we're going)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

back when i was NUTS, i used to ride my bicycle up to Lick and back for fun on weekends.


4 posted on 03/10/2012 9:47:24 AM PST by Rio
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: SunkenCiv

Great Shot! :-)


5 posted on 03/10/2012 9:48:10 AM PST by left that other site
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 2 | View Replies]

To: SunkenCiv

The Moon must have looked that big when the Earth was much younger. Of course the ocean tides many times higher.


6 posted on 03/10/2012 9:56:09 AM PST by Mike Darancette (Romney just makes me tired all over.)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: SunkenCiv

The only thing more beautiful would be a mosque framed, at sunset.... < /B S>


7 posted on 03/10/2012 9:58:45 AM PST by mikrofon (Great shot ;)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 2 | View Replies]

To: SunkenCiv
Great framed shot of the famous Lick Observatory.

I recall as a kid, probably 11 years old, writing a letter to this observatory asking for information on the telescope, and they actually sent me a free book on the scope. That was something I didn't expect.

I shot this not too long ago of the Apollo 15 landing site.

The red dot is the approximate area where our Apollo 15 landed, near the curved mountain range.

The Appennines mountain range, has over 3000 peaks, and extending in an almost continuous curve of more than 400 miles in length. No doubt from the surface, this mountain range appears pre-historic like, due to it's ruggedness.

Some peaks rise more than 15,000 feet, The square-shaped mass Mount Wolf, near the southern end of the chain, include peaks standing about 18,000 above the plain.

The last two peaks are perhaps most famous for forming the valley where the Apollo 15 was the ninth manned mission in the Apollo program and the fourth mission to land on the Moon. It was the first of what were termed "J missions", long duration stays on the Moon with a greater focus on science than had been possible on previous missions. This landing was considered one of the most scientifically successful missions of the Apollo program and started the last three J-Series missions that included the lunar rover and 3-day stays.

The camera setup when this was taken was setup for deep space images, not planetary or lunar, and is why it lacks better detail and resolution.

8 posted on 03/10/2012 9:59:44 AM PST by dragnet2 (Diversion and evasion are tools of deceit)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: SunkenCiv

Great post. Thanks.


9 posted on 03/10/2012 10:02:42 AM PST by Barnacle (Is treason a high crime or misdemeanor?)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: dragnet2

Please pardon my ignorance, but how in the hell did YOU manage to take a picture like that???!! Do you own a satellite that orbits the Moon or something? lol


10 posted on 03/10/2012 10:06:19 AM PST by KoRn (Department of Homeland Security, Certified - "Right Wing Extremist")
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 8 | View Replies]

To: dragnet2

Thanks dragnet2, nice photo and info.


11 posted on 03/10/2012 10:13:29 AM PST by SunkenCiv (I come to bury Caesar, not to praise him)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 8 | View Replies]

To: KoRn
I built a small backyard observatory, which houses a Schmidt Cassegrain, catadioptric telescope. It uses a series of mirror and lenses.

Here a shot below of the scope, which is now about 11 years old.

You'll note the twin leveling steel plates I scrounged from the scrap yard, as well as the steel pier, which I filled with fine sand to help eliminated tiny vibrations caused from tracking motors. Almost the entire mount was junkyard material

The camera can be seen at the center right of the image.


12 posted on 03/10/2012 10:16:09 AM PST by dragnet2 (Diversion and evasion are tools of deceit)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 10 | View Replies]

To: illiac; Rio; left that other site; mikrofon; Barnacle

Thanks!


13 posted on 03/10/2012 10:16:29 AM PST by SunkenCiv (I come to bury Caesar, not to praise him)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 3 | View Replies]

To: Mike Darancette

When the Days Were Shorter
Alaska Science Forum (Article #742) | November 11, 1985 | Larry Gedney
Posted on 10/04/2004 10:31:59 AM PDT by SunkenCiv
http://www.freerepublic.com/focus/chat/1234919/posts


14 posted on 03/10/2012 10:17:31 AM PST by SunkenCiv (I come to bury Caesar, not to praise him)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 6 | View Replies]

To: KoRn
I'm sorry, the camera can be seen at the center left of the image.
15 posted on 03/10/2012 10:18:01 AM PST by dragnet2 (Diversion and evasion are tools of deceit)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 10 | View Replies]

To: KoRn; dragnet2

I’m glad you asked! :’) Nice job (again)!


16 posted on 03/10/2012 10:18:37 AM PST by SunkenCiv (I come to bury Caesar, not to praise him)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 10 | View Replies]

To: SunkenCiv

Beautiful. Brings back memories, I used to hang out there as a teen. Mt. Hamilton, not the moon.


17 posted on 03/10/2012 10:23:52 AM PST by Duchess47 ("One day I will leave this world and dream myself to Reality" Crazy Horse)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: null and void

Picture is great, since I will never take that ride again. LOL


18 posted on 03/10/2012 10:32:07 AM PST by Shimmer1
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: dragnet2

Very impressive!!!


19 posted on 03/10/2012 10:50:51 AM PST by KoRn (Department of Homeland Security, Certified - "Right Wing Extremist")
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 12 | View Replies]

To: SunkenCiv; 2Fro; all_mighty_dollar; Arkat Kingtroll; Battle Hymn of the Republic; Betis70; ...

>> PING <<
Click for San Jose, California Forecast
Send FReepmail if you want on/off SVP list
The List of Ping Lists

20 posted on 03/10/2012 11:38:52 AM PST by martin_fierro (< |:)~)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: SunkenCiv

Welcome, and thanks for posting this APoD thread

I always try to stop by..


21 posted on 03/10/2012 11:42:55 AM PST by dragnet2 (Diversion and evasion are tools of deceit)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 11 | View Replies]

To: KoRn
Thanks. As I mentioned earlier, the scope/camera was not setup for planetary/lunar, but for more distant deep space objects, like this below. I was surprised and happy with this shot after processing out the image data.

Eastern Vail Nebula NGC6960

Veil Nebula is an old supernova remnant in the constellation Cygnus. It is the remains of cataclysmic explosion of star which exploded between 5,000 and 8,000 years ago.

This nebula is about 1,860 light-years distance.

16x150 seconds @ISO800- CLS filter w6.3 Focal reducer SCT/10"

22 posted on 03/10/2012 12:00:30 PM PST by dragnet2 (Diversion and evasion are tools of deceit)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 19 | View Replies]

To: SunkenCiv
Thanks for posting! Great photo. The history of James Lick and the Observatory are really fascinating. He was quite the entrepreneur and became very wealthy. The drive up to Lick is spectacular and it's a lot of fun going the 50 miles from Lick over to Livermore -- it's like you stepped back 150 years with the remote high plateau ranches and miles between houses. All within spitting distance of Silicon Valley.


23 posted on 03/10/2012 12:08:38 PM PST by ProtectOurFreedom
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: dragnet2

Bewdy, mate.


24 posted on 03/10/2012 12:38:10 PM PST by Utilizer (What does not kill you... -can sometimes damage you QUITE severely.)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 12 | View Replies]

To: SunkenCiv; All

Whoa! Thanks! Awesome stuff...


25 posted on 03/10/2012 12:54:25 PM PST by Monkey Face (If you think health care is expensive now, wait til it's free.)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: SunkenCiv

Very nice! I used to work at Lick, as an observing assistant. I operated the 120” Shane telescope.


26 posted on 03/10/2012 12:55:33 PM PST by shorty_harris
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: dragnet2

Wow! That’s an incredible image. I wish you were my next door neighbor! LOL

(you could make a small fortune charging admission for this stuff)


27 posted on 03/10/2012 6:45:24 PM PST by KoRn (Department of Homeland Security, Certified - "Right Wing Extremist")
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 22 | View Replies]

To: KoRn; SunkenCiv
Thanks!

It's a lot of fun, but with a rather steep learning curve regarding obtaining the images, maintaining precise tracking and processing the raw data. In fact processing the data is a field unto itself and is really addictive trying to squeeze all the existing data.

BTW, I find galaxies fascinating. Here is one of the more recent shots of M51. I'm still learning techniques to shoot these objects, as they are extreme low light objects, and not easy for me to process the data.

M-51 Whirlpool Galaxy and NGC 5195 - Estimated at about 37 million light years from Earth. It's diameter is about 100 thousand light years.

In 2005 a star exploded into a supernova within the galaxy. The total mass of M51 is estimated the equivalent of 160 billion suns.

By all accounts, it's believed a black hole exists at the core of this galaxy.

To put things in perspective, most of the stars seen in the image, those that are not part of the galaxy, seen surrounding the galaxy, are much closer to us. The Galaxy itself is unbelievably further away than most of those surrounding stars...Deep back in time, so to speak.

35x120 second exposures @ISO 800-6.3 focal reducer, w/Astonomik LP filter.

28 posted on 03/10/2012 9:02:25 PM PST by dragnet2 (Diversion and evasion are tools of deceit)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 27 | View Replies]

Disclaimer: Opinions posted on Free Republic are those of the individual posters and do not necessarily represent the opinion of Free Republic or its management. All materials posted herein are protected by copyright law and the exemption for fair use of copyrighted works.

Free Republic
Browse · Search
General/Chat
Topics · Post Article

FreeRepublic, LLC, PO BOX 9771, FRESNO, CA 93794
FreeRepublic.com is powered by software copyright 2000-2008 John Robinson