Free Republic
Browse · Search
General/Chat
Topics · Post Article

Skip to comments.

The Children of Linux
Unixmen ^ | 18 March 2012 | Chris Jones

Posted on 03/19/2012 7:37:40 AM PDT by ShadowAce

Linux. It’s really not a hard operating system to learn. In fact, that very first statement is wrong. Linux is not an operating system. Linux is a kernel which is used as the very core to build an operating system around. But these are the things that children of today are not learning. Not in public school systems anyway.

When I was a teenager, I was very interested in computers. I looked forward to and really enjoyed my Information Technology classes. But it wasn’t just the computers that I was interested. The more I got involved with them, the more I wanted to know about what goes on to make them work. Or to be precise, the operating system.

It’s a long time ago now, but I remember when I was talking to my teacher one day he briefly said something about Unix. A term that I had never heard until then. But after that one time, nothing more was ever mentioned. At the time, I really didn’t know anything about it. But I was intrigued of what this ‘Unix’ could be. It was some years later before I got my first glimpse of anything to do with Linux-The accepted modern alternative to Unix. My first encounter with Linux was SUSE 8, which came free on a magazine at the time. I might mention, the magazine was not actually meant to be giving the OS away on the front cover as they were. But anyway, that’s a story for another day. But ever since my first experience with SUSE 8, I never let go of Linux and have always been involved with it in one form another.

Now as you all know and are well aware, Windows is basically the only operating system taught in our public schools these days. I understand that Windows is the industry standard and I can accept that. But I don’t believe teaching children how to use Windows, solely, is the way forward to a positive IT future. Or if Linux even got a mention, it would be progress. My high school years were well into 15 years ago and it is now 2012 and nothing has changed. Public schools are still teaching children Windows and (unintentionally) presenting it as the only operating system you’ll ever need to learn and use.

There arises many issues and setbacks with the aforementioned. One of the primary reasons, being the IT teachers themselves having no concept of how to use Linux or even being aware of it. There are many issues from many different angles.
We are very lucky in some ways that we live in a world of fast broadband access where anyone can download and install Linux for free. When I was in high school, a 56k dial-up internet connection was a true privilege and there was only one computer in the whole school that had internet access. I’m probably still on that list to use that computer as the list was always a mile long.

But all my 10 years Linux experience that I have today has all been self-taught. I have put myself through free courses and done plenty of tinkering, configuring and certainly my fair share of breaking systems. And my wife yelling at me because I’ve broken the computer once again! And that continues to this day. Why? Because Linux offer endless learning capabilities. And despite being a 10 year Linux user, I am still learning things on Linux on a daily basis and still intentionally break things to see how they work in detail. In fact, I am currently experimenting with Arch Linux. A very different experience from the usual mainstream Linux distributions like Ubuntu and Fedora. But that is my point. There’s endless possibilities of learning when it comes to Linux. And perhaps that’s the problem when it comes to public schools and teaching Linux. It is such a large scale eco-system with so many different facets, where would one begin to teach. I see that as an excuse for not teaching it. And not a valid reason. Because even giving children a glimpse of Linux in their high school studies will no doubt have a flow-on effect to further private studies and courses.

Linux must be taught to future high school students. Otherwise we are going to experience a severe shortage of knowledgeable Linux administrators in the near future. We are already seeing the first signs of this problem. And unless we start arming the young nerds of today with the knowledge they require to make up their own mind, we are going to have problems. If things don’t change soon, I can only hope that today’s students come out of schooling as open-minded as I did and choose to at least give Linux a try and see for themselves the true raw power of free and open-source computing that is modern Unix, Linux.


TOPICS: Computers/Internet
KEYWORDS: linux
Navigation: use the links below to view more comments.
first 1-5051-100101-110 next last

1 posted on 03/19/2012 7:37:46 AM PDT by ShadowAce
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | View Replies]

To: rdb3; Calvinist_Dark_Lord; Salo; JosephW; Only1choice____Freedom; amigatec; stylin_geek; ...

2 posted on 03/19/2012 7:38:48 AM PDT by ShadowAce (Linux -- The Ultimate Windows Service Pack)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

Comment #3 Removed by Moderator

To: ShadowAce

The most interesting flavor for many people might be Puppy Linux. That’s the super fast flavor for people who need a computer for basic things including email, browsing, and office automation type tasks.


4 posted on 03/19/2012 7:42:36 AM PDT by varmintman
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: ShadowAce

It is wrong to say Windows is ‘the industry standard’. A very high percentage of web servers, database servers, and application servers run on Linux, Solaris, or AIX. If you want to work in IT, you need to know these operating systems.


5 posted on 03/19/2012 7:43:08 AM PDT by proxy_user
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: ShadowAce
When I was in high school, a 56k dial-up internet connection was a true privilege and there was only one computer in the whole school that had internet access.

N00b.

6 posted on 03/19/2012 7:46:06 AM PDT by martin_fierro (< |:)~)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: ShadowAce

vi forever. $rm -rf /* Ping.


7 posted on 03/19/2012 7:47:38 AM PDT by central_va ( I won't be reconstructed and I do not give a damn.)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: ShadowAce

bump for later


8 posted on 03/19/2012 7:47:46 AM PDT by SouthernBoyupNorth ("For my wings are made of Tungsten, my flesh of glass and steel..........")
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: varmintman

It almost seems that the supporters of the different variants are at each other like windows vs. mac devotees.

How does puppy linux compare to ubuntu?


9 posted on 03/19/2012 7:48:29 AM PDT by brownsfan (Aldous Huxley and Mike Judge were right.)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 4 | View Replies]

To: proxy_user
It is wrong to say Windows is ‘the industry standard’.

People are going to come on here and claim that the article was talking about desktop computing. However, backend computing is a much larger market, and is much more varied, with Windows actually having a smaller share.

10 posted on 03/19/2012 7:49:03 AM PDT by ShadowAce (Linux -- The Ultimate Windows Service Pack)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 5 | View Replies]

To: ShadowAce

Principles of computer technology should be taught to those students taking such courses. I hung out at a school with a Digital PDP-8 running the almost unknown ETOS system. Others were running punch cards on systems with EBCDIC. Others were learning on Apple IIs and Commodore PETs.

These experiences did not hinder my later becoming a Mac/Windows administrator.

Many of the important programming languages (e.g. Java) are not tied to a single platform.

Operating system administrator is not so broad a job category that it ought to be taught in high school to most students. The Windows instruction students receive today is largely transferrable to the Macbook Airs, iPads and Linux Netbooks the students already have.

No one knows what the landscape will look like in ten years, when these students are though with high school and post-secondary education and hitting the job market.

Any modern OS on an decent computer will do these days. The principles are what’s important.


11 posted on 03/19/2012 7:49:35 AM PDT by Dr. Sivana (May Mitt Romney be the Paul Tsongas of 2012.)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: central_va

quit!

oops, forgot to save, next time I will

ZZ


12 posted on 03/19/2012 7:51:32 AM PDT by Explorer89 (And now, let the wild rumpus start!!)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 7 | View Replies]

To: Dr. Sivana

Driver’s ed teaches only how to (hopefully) safely operate the car;little or nothing is taught of what goes on under the hood.

Most people could care less whether it is Windows,Mac,Linux, or BongBoola(tm) as long as it is affordable,reliable and gets the desired task done well and easily.

And that is probably a very rational attitude to have.


13 posted on 03/19/2012 7:55:39 AM PDT by hoosierham (Freedom isn't free)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 11 | View Replies]

To: Dr. Sivana
Any modern OS on an decent computer will do these days. The principles are what’s important.

The best classes I had in school focused on theory, rather than application. My "Computer Architecture" class instructor didn't care what language we used to write our labs as he wouldn't even look at the code. All he cared about was results. With those labs, you couldn't really cheat, anyway. Best class I ever took. Cost me 200 hours in the lab that quarter.

14 posted on 03/19/2012 7:57:10 AM PDT by ShadowAce (Linux -- The Ultimate Windows Service Pack)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 11 | View Replies]

To: brownsfan

Ubuntu would be more for developers and/or power users. Puppy is terribly fast even on late 90s or early 2000s computers. Only Microsoft knows how to make the computers of the last 15 years or thereabouts look slow.


15 posted on 03/19/2012 7:57:57 AM PDT by varmintman
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 9 | View Replies]

To: Explorer89

:%s/windows/unix/g


16 posted on 03/19/2012 7:58:56 AM PDT by central_va ( I won't be reconstructed and I do not give a damn.)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 12 | View Replies]

To: martin_fierro
N00b.

Agreed, unless you have used a 150 baud acoustic modem and have had to play with stop bits and parity settings, you can't really appreciate what we have today.
17 posted on 03/19/2012 7:58:56 AM PDT by Dr. Sivana (May Mitt Romney be the Paul Tsongas of 2012.)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 6 | View Replies]

To: ShadowAce

When I graduated from High School (1964) There were no computers in the school. A offsite mainframe with punch cards was used for administrative work. Even as an EE student in college (RPI 1964-68), There were no computer related courses required. After graduation, I started working as an engineer and ended up teaching myself about computer hardware and how to write programs in order to design the new products the company desired.


18 posted on 03/19/2012 8:01:15 AM PDT by AMiller
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 10 | View Replies]

To: Dr. Sivana
Yep.

I recently came across a box of my old bunch card programs. Nostalgia...

This is the second school District I've worked for as a Net Admin. Predominantly OSX with a few Win labs in the HS and Middle schools. Currently building out a ten seat Linux lab. Looking at SuSE Live for Education, Edbuntu, Mint (just because of the clean user interface), etc...

Was tempted to just set them up as kiosk's for Internet only. Lock 'em down with Iceweasel and use the Lightspeed box to restrict them to only Google Docs. I'll pilot the interface first and see what the teachers think...

19 posted on 03/19/2012 8:03:29 AM PDT by Dead Corpse (Steampunk- Yesterday's Tomorrow, Today)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 11 | View Replies]

To: hoosierham

THere are so many advantages to UNIX. No more anti virus software etc. Unless a hacker gets the root password, unix is virtually non hackable. Windows is so slow and clunky, sucks.


20 posted on 03/19/2012 8:03:31 AM PDT by central_va ( I won't be reconstructed and I do not give a damn.)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 13 | View Replies]

To: central_va

When I learned LISP (does that even still exist?) in college, the % was key to finding the matching parentheses. I seem to recall using it often at work when my C nesting got a bit out of control, as well :)


21 posted on 03/19/2012 8:05:29 AM PDT by Explorer89 (And now, let the wild rumpus start!!)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 16 | View Replies]

To: Dr. Sivana
Agreed, unless you have used a 150 baud acoustic modem and have had to play with stop bits and parity settings, you can't really appreciate what we have today.

I always thought it was like alchemy, pounding on lead trying to make gold. You never got very far but it did build character. You learned how to deal with frustration, disappointment and failure. Success was fleeting but the small rewards were appreciated.

22 posted on 03/19/2012 8:08:04 AM PDT by DeFault User
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 17 | View Replies]

To: martin_fierro

No kidding. My “first” computer was half a building.

If you haven’t dropped a tray of cards, you haven’t lived.

Internet....ha ha ha ha


23 posted on 03/19/2012 8:10:13 AM PDT by Vermont Lt (I just don't like anything about the President. And I don't think he's a nice guy.)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 6 | View Replies]

To: varmintman

“Only Microsoft knows how to make the computers of the last 15 years or thereabouts look slow.”

I’m an old timer, computer wise.

I’ve messed around with Linux from the time where the install was near torture, to now, when it’s almost painless.

Windows is brutal at times, and packed with mistakes. I can see the huge task that Windows is for Microsoft, given the need for usability for novices, backward compatibility, and device support. Windows 7 is fairly impressive. One day they may get it right!


24 posted on 03/19/2012 8:10:36 AM PDT by brownsfan (Aldous Huxley and Mike Judge were right.)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 15 | View Replies]

To: ShadowAce

Remember also that the present Apple OS system is run on a unix system, OS X, in all the various wild cats versions.


25 posted on 03/19/2012 8:12:03 AM PDT by Biggirl ("Jesus talked to us as individuals"-Jim Vicevich/Thanks JimV!)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: ShadowAce

Played around with Linux (Ubuntu, Mint) a few years ago. Gave up pretty quickly due to its inability to easily detect network settings and wireless routers. Also, the need to use command line instructions to install some software was ridiculous.

Has that changed? If I had an old PC, I might give it another look. But my Windows 7 machines run well, and I can’t see a reason for changing.


26 posted on 03/19/2012 8:14:37 AM PDT by bcsco
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: varmintman

“Only Microsoft knows how to make the computers of the last 15 years or thereabouts look slow.”
That is by design and agreement with Intel. Intel gives tons of money to developers of slow software (CPU intensive). They call it taking adInstead of square corners on frames and windows, use curved, instead of solid opaque use transparent. (Aero anyone?) All of this costs cycles. When was the last time you heard of someone optimizing code for a general purpose program? Look at the slow Visual Studio. It is full of neat tricks and whiz-bang programmer assists...all of which takes tons of disk and cpu cycles.

The problem MS and Intel face today is the proliferation of alternatives to their strategic alliance of the 90’s. It used to be everyone waited with baited breathe for the next great CPU so your computer would be faster. Today...well I don’t even know what or when the next processor is coming and neither do 90+% of all users....whereas a decade ago a much larger percentage knew and cared what Mhz or Ghz they had.
With cloud computing, most used apps being at least partially web based, the speed of the connection or the server farm tends to be more important than your laptop/desktop/handheld.
It will be interesting to see where we will be in the next decade.


27 posted on 03/19/2012 8:15:48 AM PDT by An American! (Proud To Be An American!)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 15 | View Replies]

To: ShadowAce

A co-worker and I just had this very conversation because of a question posed at a User Group meeting. It really boiled down to getting students at the HS and College level more Unix/Linux exposure. I really think that Unix/Linux has been the bedrock of a 24/7 business operation forever (in computer terms) and it is a crying shame it isn’t being taught more in academia.

We were also talking about all this because the database we use that runs on AIX is called Universe and it is a very solid and fast/flexible database that needs more exposure in academia in order to make a run at a larger market share.

What ends up happening is that the “new generation” business leaders are easily swayed by the “new shiny object” and do not give system stability enough weight not realizing the cost of downtime at all levels.


28 posted on 03/19/2012 8:17:49 AM PDT by copaliscrossing (Progressives are Socialists)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: central_va
There is no OS that is immune from the #1 virus/malware vector...

The End User Keyclick.

Linux is just as vulnerable to "click here for your malware embedded e-card/tax return/bank warning/cute puppy" type attacks. For that reason, even Linux users should still run a scanner.

Also, depending on driver support for your hardware, Linux can be "klunky" too. Win 7/8 run a lot better than their predecessors. OSX Snow Leopard/Lion run well on newer hardware, but bog out older Intel iMacs.

Too bad Mac's idiotic EFI won't let me drop Linux on those old Intel XServs. Even with rEFIt on it. The hardware would be perfect for running a VM cluster.

29 posted on 03/19/2012 8:20:04 AM PDT by Dead Corpse (Steampunk- Yesterday's Tomorrow, Today)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 20 | View Replies]

To: bcsco

“Has that changed? If I had an old PC, I might give it another look. But my Windows 7 machines run well, and I can’t see a reason for changing.”

Very much. You can make a bootable cd of ubuntu, fire it up, see if you like it. It won’t touch your hard drive. Then, you can install it if you like it.

An even more fun and painless option is to get VirtualBox and install the distribution of your choice in a virtual machine.


30 posted on 03/19/2012 8:22:32 AM PDT by brownsfan (Aldous Huxley and Mike Judge were right.)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 26 | View Replies]

To: ShadowAce

These are products. Might as well advocate teaching kids to drive various cars or to learn to use different toasters.


31 posted on 03/19/2012 8:24:36 AM PDT by CodeToad (I'm so right-wing if I lifted my left leg I'd go into a spin.)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: brownsfan

VBox works great on a Win 7 machine. I’ve been using it to go through a bunch of Linux distros and seeing how far I can tweak them before they break.

Even worked well for a Win 8 test virtual machine. I was surprised it ran so well. I still hate the new interface in 8, but it ran really smoothly.


32 posted on 03/19/2012 8:27:57 AM PDT by Dead Corpse (Steampunk- Yesterday's Tomorrow, Today)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 30 | View Replies]

To: proxy_user
Knowing a variant of Unix is always going to be a good thing when looking for a job, and in fact Unix administrators command more money although their job is signifantly less complex that that of a Windows administrator IMO. Regardless of percentages of Operating systems within a business, virtually all fortune 1000 companies are running on a Windows Domain using some combination of DHCP, DNS, AD, and Exchange so Windows admin experience is helpful too.

The majority of Desktops are still Windows and those that support them don't require Unix experience. Desktop support is typically a good percentage of IT departments.

33 posted on 03/19/2012 8:28:30 AM PDT by Durus (You can avoid reality, but you cannot avoid the consequences of avoiding reality. Ayn Rand)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 5 | View Replies]

To: proxy_user
Knowing a variant of Unix is always going to be a good thing when looking for a job, and in fact Unix administrators command more money although their job is signifantly less complex that that of a Windows administrator IMO. Regardless of percentages of Operating systems within a business, virtually all fortune 1000 companies are running on a Windows Domain using some combination of DHCP, DNS, AD, and Exchange so Windows admin experience is helpful too.

The majority of Desktops are still Windows and those that support them don't require Unix experience. Desktop support is typically a good percentage of IT departments.

34 posted on 03/19/2012 8:28:35 AM PDT by Durus (You can avoid reality, but you cannot avoid the consequences of avoiding reality. Ayn Rand)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 5 | View Replies]

To: ShadowAce
I've often compared OS's to cars.

If you want an everyday driver, don't care about maintenance, and will take it to an "expert" when things break, Widn0ze is for you.

If you want to get under the hood, tinker, and see how stuff really works in varying degrees of difficulty, go with the Linuxen.

If you want to mess around high performance engines, use the BSDs

Gates and the Teachers' Unions are in bed with our current Marxist regime of traitors, no surprise which OS will be part of the indoctrination.
35 posted on 03/19/2012 8:28:45 AM PDT by ct_libertarian (W.W.J.G.D? What would John Galt do?)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: ShadowAce

I installed Xubuntu on this Thinkpad 390E PII300, 256mb ram a few years ago replacing Win 2000 , it installs and updates(every day) like windows, it found all my hardware ,I don’t use an anti virus, runs great. It has a software centre Where I can click and install tons of free software. Linux is now a geeks OS anymore .


36 posted on 03/19/2012 8:29:00 AM PDT by molson209
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 2 | View Replies]

To: central_va

ee used here...noob on FreeBSD,but making progress

Arch is simple by comparison


37 posted on 03/19/2012 8:29:50 AM PDT by Harold Shea (RVN `70 - `71)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 7 | View Replies]

To: bcsco
Has that changed? If I had an old PC, I might give it another look.


Network mouse??

Yeah, I've found Ubuntu to be much improved. Maybe go with 10.04 LTS, which is still available (no Unity interface).

38 posted on 03/19/2012 8:30:35 AM PDT by martin_fierro (< |:)~)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 26 | View Replies]

To: ShadowAce

A knowledge of Linux or Unix will also be helpful if you use OSX (Apple Mac), which is itself, a Unix derivative.


39 posted on 03/19/2012 8:33:19 AM PDT by reg45 (Barack 0bama: Implementing class warfare by having no class!)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: martin_fierro
I had to work on an Ubuntu 11.10 box at my last contract.

I don't think I can find adequate words to express just how much the Unity interface BLOWS.
40 posted on 03/19/2012 8:38:16 AM PDT by ct_libertarian (W.W.J.G.D? What would John Galt do?)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 38 | View Replies]

To: ShadowAce

Windows is taught in schools because it IS the only OS you NEED to learn and use. Sure if you get into the business you MIGHT wind up in front of a different OS, but only a small percentage of the kids will wind up in the business, and thanks to Windows’ dominance most of the jobs in the business are on Windows, if they go to a non-Windows shop they can learn it there (really once you’ve been around a while you learn an OS is an OS is an OS, specific commands might change but the core concepts have remained the same for a long time on many platforms). Kind of like how they don’t teach kids how to drive in right hand cars, because in America they don’t need to know unless they get a job with the Post Office or travel to a handful of countries, in which case they can figure it out there.


41 posted on 03/19/2012 8:38:28 AM PDT by discostu (I did it 35 minutes ago)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: martin_fierro

Unity is t3h sux... Gnome3 on other distros is a huge step in the right direction IMO.


42 posted on 03/19/2012 8:39:14 AM PDT by Dead Corpse (Steampunk- Yesterday's Tomorrow, Today)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 38 | View Replies]

To: ct_libertarian
"If you want an everyday driver, don't care about maintenance, and will take it to an "expert" when things break, Widn0ze is for you."

Oh, man, I just ride in 'em. I don't know what makes 'em work.

43 posted on 03/19/2012 8:40:52 AM PDT by BlueLancer (KOMEN PINK: The color of the water in the basin after Pilate finished washing his hands)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 35 | View Replies]

To: BlueLancer
Oh, man, I just ride in 'em. I don't know what makes 'em work.


WOOF-WOOF-WOOF!. . .
That's my other dog imitation.
44 posted on 03/19/2012 8:44:04 AM PDT by ct_libertarian (W.W.J.G.D? What would John Galt do?)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 43 | View Replies]

To: ShadowAce

It’s probably the rare high school teacher that is marginally clued in about Linux - not to mention principals, school boards and the like. If I were teaching a class, I’d give the kids computers with unformatted hard drives, a Fedora Live CD, and a network connection and tell them that by the end of the semester they need to have a fully functional server, a fully functional client (you name the service) and a bunch of C programs and shell scripts that they would write themselves (not to mention Python, Perl, Ruby and on and on and on).

Tell me those kids wouldn’t come out of that class knowing a thing or two LOL.


45 posted on 03/19/2012 8:53:53 AM PDT by 2 Kool 2 Be 4-Gotten
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: ShadowAce
This is some hilarious stuff.

1. It’s really not a hard operating system to learn.
2. Linux is a kernel which is used as the very core to build an operating system around.

There were two sentences between lines 1 and 2. Two little sentences separating two absolutely contradictory thoughts.

"It's very simple you see... you just have to actuate the fluxcapicitor with the turboencabulator and presto changeo, internets!

Yet another article by a linux fan explaining exactly why linux should have become more popular and ironically although unintentionally illustrating clearly to those gifted with sight exactly why linux never made it mainstream.

46 posted on 03/19/2012 8:56:07 AM PDT by douginthearmy (Obamagebra: 1 job + 1 hope + 1 change = 0 jobs + 0 hope)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: martin_fierro

Bell 103 mag-amp modem culled from the dumpster.


47 posted on 03/19/2012 8:58:20 AM PDT by Pecos (O.K., joke's over. Time to bring back the Constitution.)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 6 | View Replies]

To: 2 Kool 2 Be 4-Gotten
There was a school in my town which was given a VAX in the early 1980s.
It was set up and administered by the students.
The majority of the students which did the administration went on to very good careers in IT.
48 posted on 03/19/2012 9:06:32 AM PDT by ct_libertarian (W.W.J.G.D? What would John Galt do?)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 45 | View Replies]

To: Explorer89
When I learned LISP (does that even still exist?) in college (...)

Yes, it still exists in commercial use. Cadence, who makes programs for electronics design automation (EDA), uses it in the control and GUI layer on top of (some of) their C/C++/Fortran core programs.

That's on programs based on their long-term legacy database, at least. Newer EDA programs - from Cadence and others - tend to use tcl, which I hate.

49 posted on 03/19/2012 9:07:07 AM PDT by Yossarian ("All the charm of Nixon. All the competency of Carter." - SF Chronicle comment post on Obama)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 21 | View Replies]

To: Dead Corpse
Too bad Mac's idiotic EFI won't let me drop Linux on those old Intel XServs.

Have you seen this?

50 posted on 03/19/2012 9:11:45 AM PDT by Yossarian ("All the charm of Nixon. All the competency of Carter." - SF Chronicle comment post on Obama)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 29 | View Replies]


Navigation: use the links below to view more comments.
first 1-5051-100101-110 next last

Disclaimer: Opinions posted on Free Republic are those of the individual posters and do not necessarily represent the opinion of Free Republic or its management. All materials posted herein are protected by copyright law and the exemption for fair use of copyrighted works.

Free Republic
Browse · Search
General/Chat
Topics · Post Article

FreeRepublic, LLC, PO BOX 9771, FRESNO, CA 93794
FreeRepublic.com is powered by software copyright 2000-2008 John Robinson