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These Are The Places In America Where Alcohol Is Still Banned (Ghosts Of Prohibition)
IO9 ^ | March 23, 2012 | Robert T. Gonzalez

Posted on 03/24/2012 8:56:57 AM PDT by DogByte6RER

These are the places in America where alcohol is still banned

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The year was 1933. America's fourteen-year experiment in sobriety was over; the federally mandated ban on the sale and manufacture of alcohol had been lifted. All across the U.S., people welcomed the repeal of prohibition with open arms and flowing taps.

Or rather, most of them did. Meet the counties where America's "noble experiment" never died.

When prohibition lifted almost eighty years ago, many communities (particularly in the Bible Belt) voted to keep alcohol bans in place at the local level. Today, there are still more than 200 "dry" counties nationwide with what most would consider excessively stringent liquor laws. There are even more that remain partially dry (or "moist," to those familiar with the particulars of prohibition legislation).

It's interesting to compare the effects of early 20th century prohibition against those of 2012. America's first experiment with alcohol regulation was a failure on many fronts. Alcohol consumption remained rampant. Thousands died from poorly prepared bathtub liquor. But on the other hand, it also fueled a pretty badass culture of back-alley science and innovation. Smugglers looking to bootleg booze had to come up with innovative ways of eluding the law. Sometimes this involved coming up with creative ways to hide cargo; other times all it meant was being able to outrun whoever was chasing you.

In many ways, prohibition was the catalyst for the first (and arguably biggest) large-scale Do-It-Yourself science movement in the nation's history; home-brewing became extremely popular during prohibition, with magazines like Popular Science publishing how-to guides for assembling DIY distilleries, and measuring your alcohol to keep it within the ABV standards outlined by the eighteenth amendment.

Today, however, it seems like the only real benefit to prohibition is the sense of moral superiority that it instills in those who support it — and that's a reality many of the country's driest regions are having to face up to. According to the BBC, many communities that have been dry for decades have been forced to re-evaluate their non-alcoholic standards in light of hard economic times. If you look at the map, you'll notice that many of the dry and moist counties are interspersed with wet ones. With establishments in dry communities losing business to those in counties that permit alcohol, there are many who feel that the prohibition model cannot hold.

"I hope that we can move into the 21st Century and take advantage of a lot of the things that other communities have," explained Paul Croley, a local lawyer who recently led a campaign to change the status of Williamsburg Kentucky from dry to moist. (The tiny community voted on Tuesday — by a margin of just 14 votes — to finally allow the sale of alcohol in restaurants).

"It is time to wake up and realise that our standard of living can be as good as our neighbours."


TOPICS: Chit/Chat; Miscellaneous; Reference; Society; Weird Stuff
KEYWORDS: abc; alcohol; beer; bluelaws; boozeban; cheers; drycounties; liquor; nannystate; prohibition; sobriety; temperance; wine
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Yikes! The ghost of the original battleaxe, Carrie Nation, lives on!

Bio - Standing at nearly 6 feet tall and weighing 180 pounds, Carry Amelia Moore Nation, Carrie Nation, as she came to be known, cut an imposing figure. Wielding a hatchet, she was downright frightful. In 1900, the target of Nation's wrath was alcoholic drink. Between 1900 and 1910 she was arrested some 30 times after leading her followers in the destruction of one water hole after another with cries of "Smash, ladies, smash!"

1 posted on 03/24/2012 8:57:02 AM PDT by DogByte6RER
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To: Slings and Arrows

Ping

(I hate to say it, but I think I may avoid some of these highlighted red state areas on this map.)


2 posted on 03/24/2012 9:01:25 AM PDT by DogByte6RER ("Loose lips sink ships")
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To: DogByte6RER
Today, however, it seems like the only real benefit to prohibition is the sense of moral superiority that it instills in those who support it

The same will be said of the current drug prohibition. It fuels organized crime to the point that entire continents are destabilized, it finances terrorism, and all for nothing as it doesn't stop addicts from spending their last dime on their drug of choice. Prohibition is utterly counterproductive.

3 posted on 03/24/2012 9:03:18 AM PDT by Gluteus Maximus
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To: DogByte6RER

That red splotch in South Dakota is the Pine Ridge Reservation, where the ban on alcohol is moot since the unincorporated White Clay, Nebraska (pop 14) lies 2 miles south, and sells over 5 million cans of beer each year. Go figure.


4 posted on 03/24/2012 9:04:10 AM PDT by bigbob
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To: DogByte6RER
I grew up in a dry township in Ohio. No alcohol was sold or served, anywhere. Of course every main highway in and out of town had taverns right at the township line...
5 posted on 03/24/2012 9:04:54 AM PDT by hinckley buzzard
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To: DogByte6RER

There is a lot of history here. If you went back to 1888...the vast majority of men in America were consuming a fair amount of booze on a daily basis. Wives were buying the medicinal bottles loaded with alcohol and narcotics. We were a vast society consumed with ease of purchase and acceptance by society.

So this clean-up period in the 1900’s did some good. It made everyone stand back and reflect on what we were doing. But I’d admit that any county that remains dry today....is losing millions on tax revenue to surrounding counties that accept liquor sales. I grew up in a dry county, which still remains dry today. They’ve lost at least $50 million over the past thirty years since I left the county as a kid....which went to their neighbors instead.


6 posted on 03/24/2012 9:05:41 AM PDT by pepsionice
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To: DogByte6RER
Odd that the whiskey producing region is moist or dry.

I went to college in a city that was dry long after prohibition. One of its suburbs, a small town only a few blocks long was just across the street. To this day that suburb is composed entirely of bars.

7 posted on 03/24/2012 9:06:51 AM PDT by Vince Ferrer
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To: DogByte6RER
Last night a new episode of “Who Do You Think You Are?” was on NBC. It featured the ancestors of actress Helen Hunt. At first the actress was disturbed that her great-great-grandmother lead the fight for prohibition in Maine. Once she was enlightened about the issue, her opinion changed. During that time frame, there were more alcoholics per ca pita that at any other time in our nations history, even among children. According to the program, the people who bore the brunt of widespread alcoholism were women who were physically and sexually abused. So, until I look into the issue further, I will withhold my judgment.
8 posted on 03/24/2012 9:08:01 AM PDT by shatcher
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To: DogByte6RER

Incidentally, Kansas (home of Carrie Nation) still hasn’t ratified the 21st Amendment, and continues to have some of the screwiest alcohol laws in the country.


9 posted on 03/24/2012 9:08:57 AM PDT by bigbob
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To: DogByte6RER

She doesn’t look like Whitney Houston.


10 posted on 03/24/2012 9:09:55 AM PDT by blueunicorn6 ("A crack shot and a good dancer")
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To: DogByte6RER

Any study like this should also include MADD laws, since there are other means to prohibition.


11 posted on 03/24/2012 9:10:28 AM PDT by Vince Ferrer
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To: DogByte6RER

If I would have saw that hateful old bitch coming into my business, I might have cut her in half with a shotgun. (the bouncer sure as hell wouldn’t be able to handle her lol)


12 posted on 03/24/2012 9:11:42 AM PDT by KoRn (Department of Homeland Security, Certified - "Right Wing Extremist")
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To: DogByte6RER

Has anybody noticed that Carrie Nation looks like Barney Frank in drag?


13 posted on 03/24/2012 9:14:19 AM PDT by SamAdams76 (I am 49 days away from outliving Phil Hartman)
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To: DogByte6RER

Has anybody noticed that Carrie Nation looks like Barney Frank in drag?


14 posted on 03/24/2012 9:14:25 AM PDT by SamAdams76 (I am 49 days away from outliving Phil Hartman)
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To: pepsionice
My own opinion on alcohol in the past is that it was probably a good thing, as alcohol kills bacteria in water. Drinking beer and wine was probably better than drinking water. Prohibition comes at a time when sanitation was improving and water became safer to drink, and alcoholism became an avoidable problem rather than a necessary evil.
15 posted on 03/24/2012 9:15:40 AM PDT by Vince Ferrer
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To: DogByte6RER

The churches still dictate local laws in some of these parts. Saving us from ourselves I suppose.


16 posted on 03/24/2012 9:16:51 AM PDT by GunRunner (***Not associated with any criminal actions by the ATF***)
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To: DogByte6RER

Why is Utah not highlighted anywhere? I was up there snowboarding once and my buddy and I couldn’t find a bar or any place that sold liquor anywhere near Orem or Provo.


17 posted on 03/24/2012 9:18:49 AM PDT by GunRunner (***Not associated with any criminal actions by the ATF***)
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To: DogByte6RER
Alcohol consumption remained rampant

Just for accurate history's sake, this is a misleading statement. Alcohol consumption plummeted; all over the country, drying out places closed for lack of business. Liver disease fell.

Whether these were worth the black market that sprang up is a judgement call.

But Prohibition proved one thing very clearly: If you pass a law to control a certain behavior, most law-abiding citizens will respect the law and not do it.(That's what "law abiding" means, after all). When Prohibition was repealed consumption returned to former levels.

The facts suggest that legalizing marijuana will result in a significant rise in consumption as the law abiding people who eschew it now would feel free to indulge. Something to consider for the implications.

BTW America has a history of such laws going back to colonial times. Prohibition was in the grand tradition of "sumptuary laws" carried over from England, and which sought to enforce morality in all sorts of ways. Like Prohibition they were inconsistent, often repealed after elections, with little effect in the long run.

18 posted on 03/24/2012 9:22:12 AM PDT by hinckley buzzard
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To: DogByte6RER

I wouldn’t exactly call it prohibition here in Michigan. 5 hours per day you can’t buy alcohol is no big deal. (2AM to 7AM) Just buy what you need before 2AM.

An old girl who has been running one local party store since 1938 won’t sell till 5PM on Sundays.


19 posted on 03/24/2012 9:22:45 AM PDT by cripplecreek (What does it profit a man if he gains the whole world but loses his soul?)
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To: GunRunner

As I understand it Utah has odd laws regarding alcohol sales. Seems like I read that you have to buy a membership kinda like belonging to the Elks or Moose.


20 posted on 03/24/2012 9:27:13 AM PDT by cripplecreek (What does it profit a man if he gains the whole world but loses his soul?)
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To: hinckley buzzard

Same here, and I loved those taverns!
Best chow around!


21 posted on 03/24/2012 9:27:27 AM PDT by mylife (The Roar Of The Masses Could Be Farts)
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To: DogByte6RER
These Are The Places In America Where Alcohol Is Still Banned

Probably not a coincidence that these are areas Rick Santorum seems to do best.

22 posted on 03/24/2012 9:28:36 AM PDT by Longbow1969
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To: DogByte6RER
Binge drinking fuelling liver deaths in UK
23 posted on 03/24/2012 9:29:22 AM PDT by Berlin_Freeper
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To: DogByte6RER
The map needs more work. North Carolina allows local governments to permit liquor by the drink (many do) and operate municipal liquor stores for hard liquor (most do). Ok, it's marked yellow.

But Minnesota has a similar local option for towns to operate liquor stores and even bars (e.g. http://www.cityofsavage.com/how-it-started ) and Minnesota is all blue.

24 posted on 03/24/2012 9:31:41 AM PDT by RightGeek (FUBO and the donkey you rode in on)
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To: hinckley buzzard

As a matter of fact, the town is still dry and everyone that lives there frequents the taverns in the next town.

http://www.thebluewolftavern.com/

It makes no sense.


25 posted on 03/24/2012 9:32:22 AM PDT by mylife (The Roar Of The Masses Could Be Farts)
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To: Berlin_Freeper
Binge drinking fueling liver deaths in UK

I saw a report on the BBC yesterday about that. Naturally the only solution they can find is to set a minimum price on alcohol.
26 posted on 03/24/2012 9:34:40 AM PDT by cripplecreek (What does it profit a man if he gains the whole world but loses his soul?)
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To: DogByte6RER

That map is a little misleading, at least it is as far as the Carolinas are concerned.

NC is largely yellow because the ABC stores are all state run. You can’t buy a bottle of anything stronger than wine in a private store. Also, these state run ABC stores are closed on Sunday.

Then, you have SC, which from all appearances on the map is wide open “wet.”. Wrong. It’s a heavily tourist dependent state, but like most tourist areas there are traps designed to relieve you of money. SC requires all mixed drinks to be poured in precise measure, from those little airplane bottles. Last I knew, they were all you could get there, in a bar or a store.

So, it’s misleading, as I said.

So’s Virginia, really. They’re very law and order, and as favorably as i tend to look upon maintenance of public order, they’re a little too hardassed about it. I don’t understand the Commonwealth very well, and the county police forces are not something with which I’d want to tangle very often, over anything. A speeding ticket can leave you feeling as if you’ve just had a brush with a tad too much authoritarianism.


27 posted on 03/24/2012 9:34:59 AM PDT by RegulatorCountry
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To: everyone

I live in a dry county in Kentucky. There are several bootleggers and clubs where alcohol is served. Word is the Bootleggers and Baptists keep the county dry.


28 posted on 03/24/2012 9:37:10 AM PDT by chittlin (chittlin)
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To: GunRunner

“Eat, Drink and Be Merry....for tomorrow, ye may be in Utah.”


29 posted on 03/24/2012 9:38:01 AM PDT by dfwgator (Don't wake up in a roadside ditch. Get rid of Romney.)
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To: DogByte6RER

Funny ! places in ole kentucky are dry as a bone but you can get booze in just about any dance hall and state park brand name from the back of a pickup truck or the trunk of a car things aren’t as dry as you would think ....


30 posted on 03/24/2012 9:38:39 AM PDT by ATOMIC_PUNK (Any man may make a mistake ; none but a fool will persist in it . { Latin proverb })
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To: RegulatorCountry

Seems to me that the fact that the laws do appear to be very much up to the individual counties, indicates a great deal of freedom.


31 posted on 03/24/2012 9:40:44 AM PDT by cripplecreek (What does it profit a man if he gains the whole world but loses his soul?)
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To: chittlin

That’s what they do in Texas.
It’s a scam


32 posted on 03/24/2012 9:41:31 AM PDT by mylife (The Roar Of The Masses Could Be Farts)
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To: DogByte6RER

Alaska has quite a few dry Indian villages - for good reason.


33 posted on 03/24/2012 9:43:52 AM PDT by dainbramaged (OMG - Obama Must Go)
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To: cripplecreek
Funny we had to do just that. On our way back from Park City to Orem, we found a log cabin bar and walked in and ordered some beers. The bartender asked if we were "members", and we said no. He said someone had to sponsor you to be a member, and the crusty old lady next to us volunteered to "sponsor" our membership.

Then we had to pay $20 membership fee. Then drank two beers and left. Silly stuff.

34 posted on 03/24/2012 9:46:25 AM PDT by GunRunner (***Not associated with any criminal actions by the ATF***)
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To: GunRunner

No cover charge?


35 posted on 03/24/2012 9:48:43 AM PDT by mylife (The Roar Of The Masses Could Be Farts)
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To: cripplecreek

That’s a funny concept of freedom. Luckily the tyranny of the local majority is easier to escape than the tyranny of the national majority.


36 posted on 03/24/2012 9:49:07 AM PDT by GunRunner (***Not associated with any criminal actions by the ATF***)
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To: GunRunner

The unicard is dead here.

http://www.unicardsystems.com/

It used to be that we had to buy a unicard, buy a club membership AND pay a cover charge LOL

Its a scam.


37 posted on 03/24/2012 9:51:42 AM PDT by mylife (The Roar Of The Masses Could Be Farts)
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To: All

Here is a list of places to avoid in Texas that participate in this Bull puckey.

http://www.unicardsystems.com/clublist.asp


38 posted on 03/24/2012 9:55:43 AM PDT by mylife (The Roar Of The Masses Could Be Farts)
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To: GunRunner
That’s a funny concept of freedom. Luckily the tyranny of the local majority is easier to escape than the tyranny of the national majority.

VS the federal government dictating for all, in my opinion it is very free. Even if its a restriction, if the control is local, its always better.
39 posted on 03/24/2012 9:57:10 AM PDT by cripplecreek (What does it profit a man if he gains the whole world but loses his soul?)
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To: dfwgator
“Eat, Drink and Be Merry....for tomorrow, ye may be in Utah.”

Yet Utah isn't dry.

Go figure...

40 posted on 03/24/2012 10:02:28 AM PDT by null and void (Day 1159 of America's ObamaVacation from reality [Heroes aren't made, Frank, they're cornered...])
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To: cripplecreek

It’s a matter of public vote, county by county, as to whether mixed drink sales will be permitted. It’s also a matter of public vote on a municipal level, whether an ABC store will be allowed there, and what sort of drinking establishments as well as permitted hours of operation.

Maybe I’m biased, but I tended bar in a dry county, and everyone involved managed to enjoy themselves. The private bar was in a very old hunting lodge-cum-resort. There were liquor lockers for individual safekeeping. Patrons had their own personal cases for locked storage as well as a touch of style, with sometimes very fine ones, leather, monogrammed.

It was another world, and not necessarily a bad one.


41 posted on 03/24/2012 10:05:15 AM PDT by RegulatorCountry
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To: RegulatorCountry
You are wrong about SC. They repealed the mini-bottle laws some time ago. You can buy and drinks can be poured from regular bottles. Plus, having lived all over this country, liquor prices in SC are very competitive as it is a free market, not like the state stores in NC.
42 posted on 03/24/2012 10:05:50 AM PDT by burghguy
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To: mylife

The Goverment-Prohibitionist Complex. Puritans (including conservative Puritans) love big government when it meets their “moral” standards.


43 posted on 03/24/2012 10:07:16 AM PDT by GunRunner (***Not associated with any criminal actions by the ATF***)
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To: cripplecreek

Local government control is better, but it’s still government control.


44 posted on 03/24/2012 10:08:48 AM PDT by GunRunner (***Not associated with any criminal actions by the ATF***)
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To: GunRunner
Luckily the tyranny of the local majority is easier to escape than the tyranny of the national majority.

That's why I am a conservative. I am willing to accept people wanting these kinds of laws if they are done at a local level, where people can choose to escape them if they wish. It is liberals that feel if it is a good idea, it is a great idea if it is mandatory and forced on the whole country, if not the whole world.

45 posted on 03/24/2012 10:09:14 AM PDT by Vince Ferrer
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To: DogByte6RER

Just to note, many of the ‘dry’ counties in Kansas do have Taverns. 3.2 beers available...


46 posted on 03/24/2012 10:09:29 AM PDT by Dust in the Wind (U S Troops Rock)
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To: GunRunner
Why is Utah not highlighted anywhere?

Good question, I was there for a job interview some years ago and could not find a "bar" in my hotel. It turns out that locals can buy hard liquor, beer or wine at state controlled stores. There are "drinking" clubs which you can join which look just like bars except they are BYOB. The "club" also provided members with individual storage lockers to keep their booze, their contribution to the party being glasses, ice, and mixers. Utah has (had?) very restrictive drunk driving regulations which called for a six month suspension if caught driving drunk which was raised to a full year if you had an open container (seal broken) in the car (even in the trunk!). The result being that people who brought a bottle of wine to a friends house for a party tended to drink the whole bottle rather then risk driving with an "open" bottle, this was also the reason for lockers at the private clubs.

I believe Oklahoma had a similar accommodation although it did extend to actual bars in hotels. I have hazy memories of "The Impact Zone" in a Fort Sill hotel...

Regards,
GtG

47 posted on 03/24/2012 10:09:58 AM PDT by Gandalf_The_Gray (I live in my own little world, I like it 'cuz they know me here.)
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To: GunRunner

When I first moved to Texas some 20 years ago, some friends to me out for a night on the town.

We went to the local watering spot in the dry town..

“do you have a club mebership?” they asked. No
“thats $5 but its a lifetime membership” I ponied up.

“there’s a 5 dollar cover charge” I ponied up

We get in and i order a beer.

“do you have a unicard?” No.
“its $5 but its a lifetime membership” I ponied up and order a Bud...

“that’ll be $5 hon” here’s your tip.. LoL

I take a sip and one of my friends says “its dead in here, let’s go someplace else”

LoL lather rinse repeat!

Now the place is wet and we can dispense with this BS robbery.
We found that during voting for wet or dry, that the local bible thumpers that said in circulated flyers it was going to bring crime and vice to the area actually were the people that had liquor clubs.

They just didnt need anyone cutting in on the action LoL


48 posted on 03/24/2012 10:14:13 AM PDT by mylife (The Roar Of The Masses Could Be Farts)
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To: GunRunner
Local government control is better, but it’s still government control.

Local government is representative of local desires. Anything less would be anarchy.
49 posted on 03/24/2012 10:14:45 AM PDT by cripplecreek (What does it profit a man if he gains the whole world but loses his soul?)
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To: burghguy

Well, that’s a relief. It was a bizarre law.

Can a bartender still be given a citation for a heavy pour?


50 posted on 03/24/2012 10:15:13 AM PDT by RegulatorCountry
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