Free Republic
Browse · Search
General/Chat
Topics · Post Article

Skip to comments.

Weekly Gardening Thread -- Vol. 14, April 6, 2012
free republic | April 6, 2012

Posted on 04/06/2012 7:46:05 AM PDT by dennisw

Open for business...ready for your recent gardening adventures


TOPICS: Gardening
KEYWORDS: gardening

1 posted on 04/06/2012 7:46:16 AM PDT by dennisw
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | View Replies]

To: dennisw

Went to the supermarket, and bought 4 bunches of spring onions. Stuck ‘em in the ground. They’re doing just fine! Not much of an adventure.


2 posted on 04/06/2012 7:57:56 AM PDT by Dr. Bogus Pachysandra ( Ya can't pick up a turd by the clean end!)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: dennisw

Bought two peony plants yesterday and some tomatoes and peppers. I am looking for a bridal wreath spirea but can’t find it anywhere. I’m in SC anyone know where I can get one?


3 posted on 04/06/2012 8:00:20 AM PDT by estrogen (don't let the media pick our candidate)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: dennisw

Been watering my heirloom tomatoes for 6 weeks now exclusively with rainwater from my barrels...

Some of my tomatoes are already 3’ tall...

I’m near Houston


4 posted on 04/06/2012 8:11:52 AM PDT by Former MSM Viewer
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: dennisw; All

We have been drying some of the gorgeous spring flower blooms in the garden for later use in craft projects - cards, bookmarks, etc. What we are using to dry the flowers is the 'Microfleur' Flower Press Kit for Microwave Ovens. It works very well - you can dry flowers in minutes rather than weeks. We have been quite pleased ..... here's a link:

Microfleur Flower Press

5 posted on 04/06/2012 8:17:17 AM PDT by MissMagnolia (Being powerful is like being a lady. If you have to tell people you are, you aren't. (M.Thatcher))
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: dennisw
 

Thailand-Vietnam mango variety. Coming along.... maybe ripe in two months

Below is different tree. Another Thailand-Vietnam mango variety. You can see four mangoes developing. One is black and will drop off. No disease here .... the tree is just selecting what mangoes to carry.

 


6 posted on 04/06/2012 8:28:33 AM PDT by dennisw (A nation of sheep breeds a government of Democrat wolves!)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: dennisw

Putting in first spring seeds this weekend here in SE PA, looks like we had our last freeze overnight.


7 posted on 04/06/2012 8:36:50 AM PDT by dirtboy
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: dennisw

The ping list is at the bottom of JustaDumbBlonde home page. I can ping the list if you would like.


8 posted on 04/06/2012 8:40:39 AM PDT by Red_Devil 232 (VietVet - USMC All Ready On The Right? All Ready On The Left? All Ready On The Firing Line!)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: Red_Devil 232

oh yeah please do!!! (she must be on Good Friday sabbatical)


9 posted on 04/06/2012 8:42:02 AM PDT by dennisw (A nation of sheep breeds a government of Democrat wolves!)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 8 | View Replies]

To: Diana in Wisconsin; gardengirl; girlangler; SunkenCiv; HungarianGypsy; Gabz; billhilly; Alkhin; ...

Ping to all the Gardeners


10 posted on 04/06/2012 8:45:51 AM PDT by Red_Devil 232 (VietVet - USMC All Ready On The Right? All Ready On The Left? All Ready On The Firing Line!)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 9 | View Replies]

To: dennisw; All

Question: My spirea (little princess and firelight) is not leafing out on all the old wood. On some shrubs the leafing out is very spotty. Should I cut them them to the ground? The shrubs are 4-5 years old and have never been trimmed back.


11 posted on 04/06/2012 8:54:36 AM PDT by KansasGirl
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: dennisw

My squash plants, planted SEED on March 9th, are already a foot tall and blossoming!...................Cukes, planted same day, are starting to climb and tomatoes are blooming!............


12 posted on 04/06/2012 8:55:04 AM PDT by Red Badger (Think logically. Act normally.................)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: Red_Devil 232
Here in eastern NC I've got a slew of greens coming up (various leaf lettuces and swiss chard) not to mention beets, peas, and radishes. Give it another three weeks and we'll be eating fresh salad.

I started an asparagus patch this year for the first time ever; we'll see how it goes. No signs of life yet, but the roots have only been in the ground for about a week now so it's clearly too soon to tell.

Wife reported a dozen white potates sprouting in the bin in the kitchen. You guessed it... into the garden they went. Never had much luck with white potatoes in NC for whatever reason, but maybe this year will be the one.

I have decided to plant my peppers directly into the garden this year instead of starting the plants indoors. I always have high mortality due to poor hardening-off when I start them inside, and I'm thinking that growing them from seed in the garden will solve that problem.

13 posted on 04/06/2012 8:58:36 AM PDT by Oberon (Big Brutha Be Watchin'.)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 10 | View Replies]

To: Red_Devil 232

Thank you!


14 posted on 04/06/2012 9:01:05 AM PDT by trisham (Zen is not easy. It takes effort to attain nothingness. And then what do you have? Bupkis.)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 10 | View Replies]

To: dennisw
Home garden coming along nicely - 12 of 14 raised beds planted - everything but 1 type of watermelon up and happy.

This is a bit of a tangent, but it is garden related and it is Good Friday.

I am raising $500 to help a small Christian orphanage in Pakistan start a chicken farm and vegetable garden - so they can feed and support themselves.

The Facebook page is: ‘Love and Hope Christian Orphanage’.

50 X $10 buys 50 chickens and everything they need to make this dream a reality.

You can ‘buy’ a chicken via PayPal: loveandhopeproject@gmail.com.

18 chickens raised so far - only 32 to go.

Thank you!

50 X $10 buys a chicken and everything they need. 18 chickens raised so far - 32 to go.

If you'd like t

15 posted on 04/06/2012 9:13:53 AM PDT by ImProudToBeAnAmerican
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: dennisw

Not a regular here, but visit often. My bamboo stand (70ft x 15 ft plot) is doing great, in it’s (I think) 4th year. Last year I had some get around 10 ft tall. This year, I’m hoping some will get close to 15ft. Hundreds of new shoots - lovin it!

Oh, the Mrs. and I have a garden too :-) Nothing started here yet (Eastern Nebraska).

Anyone have suggestions on Blueberries? Our soil is sooo alkiline. Last week, I sprinkled ammonium sulfate around them. I’ve got 7 plants, and they’re just so spindly. They’re about 5 years old.

God Bless and Happy Easter!
Gregg


16 posted on 04/06/2012 9:25:31 AM PDT by pitviper68
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: Former MSM Viewer
Here in Kalifornia's Coachella Valley (Palm Springs area), we plant tomatoes sometime after mid-September, and they're pretty much totally harvested by late January.

I yanked ours around February 1, and planted some watermelon and cuke seeds immediately....the seedlings are around 4 inches tall as of now.

17 posted on 04/06/2012 9:29:48 AM PDT by ErnBatavia (A conservative, a liberal and a moderate walked into a bar; barkeep said "Hi Mitt")
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 4 | View Replies]

To: dennisw

I’m one of those people I love to grow just about anything I can grow. Have a 1/5 acre so have the room to grow alot of different things, and I don’t tend to grow alot of any one things.

Probably if I had to list the companies that are my favorite sources for different stuff, it would have to be Fedco, Baker Creek, Seed Savers Exchange, Bountiful Gardens, and Horizon herbs. Some of the new stuff being tried this year:

Kamut Wheat
Hulless Barley
Magentaspreen lambsquarters
Fiber flax
Amole
Quinoa
Pipian for Tuxpan seed squash
Toraziroh
Fiskeby soybean


18 posted on 04/06/2012 9:30:09 AM PDT by Free Vulcan (Election 2012 - America stands or falls. No more excuses. Get involved.)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: dennisw

Enjoying my home grown lettuce and Swiss chard very much. Plenty of pansies and other spring flowers to decorate the house with. Happy Easter to all. Happy Passover as well.


19 posted on 04/06/2012 9:35:21 AM PDT by tob2 (November can't come soon enough for me.)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: ErnBatavia
I'm into my second round of tomatoes (pulled first in January here in LA county).
But, I've always just let them grow as they want...I've been told to pinch off the 'suckers' to limit unnecessary vines and such.

Sadly, I forgot how to identify a sucker from any other growth.

Can anyone out there set me straight?

Also harvesting radish, onion, several type peppers, and turnips while Cukes and green beans develop.

20 posted on 04/06/2012 9:47:49 AM PDT by norton (I will transmit this information to Vladimir.)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 17 | View Replies]

To: norton
I only pinch the suckers on my tomatoes until they have a really strong stem system, usually two or three sets of blooms up, then I let them go wild.

There are really 2 different schools of thought on the pinching of suckers; one that insists it must be done and those that don't. lol

It used to be that the oldtimers swore you HAD to pinch suckers to get the best fruit and with some open pollinated varieties, that may still be true. I have grown tomatoes both ways, and have some to the conclusion that it isn't necessary.

The size of the fruit may be slightly larger on pruned tomato plants, that depends more on the fertility of your soil than the pruning. There is no doubt that you will grow more fruit if you do not prune heavily.

The website for Bonnie Plants, probably the largest plant supplier in the South at least, indicates that the plants they sell do not require pinching. It is really a matter of personal preference. Do what works for you.

21 posted on 04/06/2012 12:43:36 PM PDT by JustaDumbBlonde (Don't wish doom on your enemies ... plan it.)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 20 | View Replies]

To: Red_Devil 232; dennisw

Thanks for the ping Red, and the thread dennisw.


22 posted on 04/06/2012 2:12:16 PM PDT by fanfan (This is not my Father's Ontario. http://www.ontariolandowners.ca/)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 8 | View Replies]

To: JustaDumbBlonde
There are really 2 different schools of thought on the pinching of suckers; one that insists it must be done and those that don't. lol

None of my 140 varieties of tomatoes will have their suckers pinched this year...I get enough tomatoes as it is.

My wife pinches suckers when I'm not looking, but she has a mean streak. G-d forbid if you're a hornworm and she finds you before me...

23 posted on 04/06/2012 2:19:29 PM PDT by who knows what evil? (G-d saved more animals than people on the ark...www.siameserescue.org.)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 21 | View Replies]

To: pitviper68

You need to seriously acidify your soil for blueberries. IIRC, they grow best in a soil pH of 4.0-6.0.


24 posted on 04/07/2012 9:00:49 AM PDT by Sarajevo (Money cannot buy happiness, but it's more comfortable to cry in a Mercedes than on a bicycle.)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 16 | View Replies]

To: dennisw
The hoophouse and greenhouse plants are coming along well. I have several types of tomato, squash, melon, okra, peanuts, radish, and peppers; plus potato, zukes, cukes, and a small corn patch. The cabbage was hit by insects and the leaves look like they were shot with buckshot.

I'm experimenting with hydroponics this year. I have 2- 10ft long troughs circulating through a 600gal stock tank where I'm trying to grow more tomato's and peppers. The tomato are doing well (so far), but the peppers seemingly failed to germinate.

25 posted on 04/07/2012 9:09:44 AM PDT by Sarajevo (Money cannot buy happiness, but it's more comfortable to cry in a Mercedes than on a bicycle.)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: pitviper68

I know I am late to the thread, but I thought I would tell you how a friend who owned a nursery told me to plant blueberries.

She said dig a really big hole, and put a big bag of sphagnum moss next to it; Cut an x in the bag and stick a hose in it and let it soak all night. Next day, plant the blueberry in the hole with the wet moss. Don’t use any dirt, just the moss. That makes it acid enough.


26 posted on 04/08/2012 6:54:31 PM PDT by Grammy
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 16 | View Replies]

To: dennisw
We had another week of nice weather here in Central Missouri. I've never seen a spring quite like this one.

I planted a row of mixed lettuces and a row of kale/collards, and re-potted my peppers and tomatoes. It's still too early to set those out.

Brought home a dozen chicks and got them set up in the brooder house.

Image and video hosting by TinyPic

27 posted on 04/09/2012 6:28:11 AM PDT by Augie
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: Sarajevo

I’m planning to do some work with greenhouses and hydroponics in years to come when I have my own home. Would you be able to post some pictures of your setup?


28 posted on 04/09/2012 9:53:42 AM PDT by stefanbatory (Insert witty tagline here)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 25 | View Replies]

To: Red_Devil 232; JustaDumbBlonde; All
We just got the grand-kids computer back from the shop today. Mine is still in the shop. So I am stealing a few minutes.

We had salad from the winter garden for Easter. Only have one head left. Perennial bed is almost finished. I have stevia, french tarragon, lavender, and rosemary to put in so far. Hope to get that done this week.

We made flower pots out of newspaper and started a bunch more of tomatoes. All heirlooms. Hubby likes the big tomatoes so that one slice covers the bread on a sandwich. I also like smaller tomatoes for salads so that I don't have to put them in the fridge which ruins the texture. So we have several sizes. LOL.

Have a good week. God bless.

29 posted on 04/09/2012 2:48:50 PM PDT by greeneyes (Moderation in defense of your country is NO virtue. Let Freedom Ring.)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 10 | View Replies]

To: Augie

At first glance I thought that was a picture of baby rabbits attacking your lettuces! LOL


30 posted on 04/09/2012 3:42:53 PM PDT by Red_Devil 232 (VietVet - USMC All Ready On The Right? All Ready On The Left? All Ready On The Firing Line!)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 27 | View Replies]

To: stefanbatory
I sure can!

You can find several different plans for the expanded dome greenhouse that I had built at WorldFlower Garden Domes They are easy to build and very strong. Mine is 20ft wide x 32ft long, and 13ft high. Here is a picture at night:

and a shot of the interior before it was fully covered:

The main problem I found with this greenhouse is the heat in the summer. When outside temps get in the 80's, the inside is easily pushing the mid-90's and the plants go dormant or grow long and leggy and won't produce.I run a large fan inside and had a misting system, but it's a losing battle, even after I added ventilation. Since you are up north, you shouldn't encounter those issues. On the flip side, it is an excellent place to protect many plants in the winter. The total price for this setup was in the neighborhood of $7000.

Another option you can look at are hoophouses. I set this one up last summer as an option for my raised beds: It's main purpose is to protect the raised beds from the marauding deer we have in the area. It is built from 1 3/8inch toprail, available at Lowes or Home Depot. They are easily bent with a Quick Hoops™ High Tunnel Bender and they also have a downloadable .pdf instruction file. The materials for my hoophouse came to approximately $400, but I used materials I had laying around the house for the raised beds and the manure I filled them with was free. I believe that it can be done for $700 if all materials are new. As you see, I built large square beds to avoid a lot of cutting. A better option is to build slimmer beds that extend along each side of the hoophouse. That will give easy access down the center. If you have good soil, you won't even need to construct raised beds.

If I had to do it all over again, I would have just built several hoophouses. I grew cold weather plants (cabbage, radish, brocolli, peas, and lettuce) in them by simply protecting the plants with plastic drop cloth when there was a freeze warning. You'll note that I used green 70% shadecloth on the top, which was inexpensive. If shading is needed, a 30% shadecloth is more suitable.

I'll have to wait until morning to take photo's of the hydroponic experiment. If I forget, ping me and I'll get on it. In the meantime, you can browse the Farmtek website. I used the GT80 series channel, lids, and end caps.

31 posted on 04/09/2012 7:43:18 PM PDT by Sarajevo (Money cannot buy happiness, but it's more comfortable to cry in a Mercedes than on a bicycle.)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 28 | View Replies]

To: Sarajevo

Thanks so much! I was leaning heavily towards the hoop house route. I will need end caps and sheeting that can stay in place over winter though...:)


32 posted on 04/09/2012 8:26:02 PM PDT by stefanbatory (Insert witty tagline here)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 31 | View Replies]

To: stefanbatory
Check out the downloadable .pdf that I linked to. It has just what you're looking for, and it's simple.

As I promised, here is a picture of the "experiment:

It's a real simple setup. The channels are 10ft each. The stock tank has fish in it. Water is cycled through 12hrs on/12hrs off with a 285gph pond pump using a timer. The water returns to the pond by gravity feed and provides aeration for the fish.

I'm not sure how the plants will do in the heat in the greenhouse. I previously used a misting loop and a fan for evaporative cooling, but that left a lot of calcium residue on the leaves of the plants I'm hoping that the plants will prosper by simply keeping the roots well watered and cool.

It's real difficult to see, but the channel in the foreground has tomato plants that were started from seed. The back channel was seeded with peppers, but I haven't seen any growth so far.

33 posted on 04/10/2012 11:14:52 AM PDT by Sarajevo (Money cannot buy happiness, but it's more comfortable to cry in a Mercedes than on a bicycle.)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 32 | View Replies]

To: Sarajevo

this looks like a sensible step 2 after I have gotten the hoop house part of things figured out...I also have a friend nearby from grade school who has been designing and building his own hydroponic systems...(for vegetables)


34 posted on 04/11/2012 5:49:50 AM PDT by stefanbatory (Insert witty tagline here)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 33 | View Replies]

Disclaimer: Opinions posted on Free Republic are those of the individual posters and do not necessarily represent the opinion of Free Republic or its management. All materials posted herein are protected by copyright law and the exemption for fair use of copyrighted works.

Free Republic
Browse · Search
General/Chat
Topics · Post Article

FreeRepublic, LLC, PO BOX 9771, FRESNO, CA 93794
FreeRepublic.com is powered by software copyright 2000-2008 John Robinson