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Collision Suspected In Yacht Mishap That Killed 3
AP) ^

Posted on 04/29/2012 9:48:12 AM PDT by BenLurkin

NEWPORT BEACH (AP) — A yacht involved in a race off the coast of California and Mexico apparently collided at night with a much larger vessel, leaving three crew members dead and one missing, a sailing organization said early Sunday. It was the state’s second ocean racing tragedy this month.

The 37-foot Aegean carrying a crew of four was reported missing Saturday during a 125-mile Newport Beach, Calif. to Ensenada, Mexico yacht race, the U.S. Coast Guard said.

The Newport Ocean Sailing Association, the race organizer, said the accident occurred late Friday or early Saturday several miles off the coast near the ocean border of the two countries.

“It appeared the damage was not inflicted by an explosion but by a collision with a ship much larger than the 37-foot vessel,” association spokesman Rich Roberts said in a news release early Sunday.

Race officials believe there are few other possibilities for what caused the accident, Roberts later told The Associated Press, speaking by phone from Ensenada.

He said details were still scarce but it was possible that if the smaller boat was bobbing around in light wind, the crew might not have been able to get out of the way of a larger ship, perhaps a freighter. The race goes through shipping lanes and it’s possible for a large ship to hit a sailboat and not even know it, especially at night, he said.

Roberts said a race tracking system indicated that the boat disappeared about 1:30 a.m. PDT Saturday.

A Coast Guard search turned up the boat’s wreckage, including the rear transom with the boat’s name on it, the association release said.

Three crew members of the sailboat were found dead and a search was under way early Sunday for the fourth.

(Excerpt) Read more at losangeles.cbslocal.com ...


TOPICS: Sports
KEYWORDS: mystery; mysterycrash; yacht
Hmmm....
1 posted on 04/29/2012 9:48:18 AM PDT by BenLurkin
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To: BenLurkin

One thing I learned from my boat owning days is that any body of water will try very, very hard to kill you. Oftentime in very unexpected ways.


2 posted on 04/29/2012 9:55:50 AM PDT by Lurker (The avalanche has begun. The pebbles no longer have a vote.)
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To: BenLurkin
A glass boat doesn't give much of a radar return, even if a ship has a full time radar watch.

A lot of racers don't like a radar reflector, up high on the mast, since it might offer wind resistance.

3 posted on 04/29/2012 10:03:37 AM PDT by jonascord (Any Democrat = Classic examples of the Downing Effect.)
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To: BenLurkin

I know morons here in Texas that have large fishing boats who set their auto pilots and gps gear up such that they go out in the dark at 55mph plus to their fishing spots. This may not sound all that bad to some people familiar with boating until you understand that they do this while they are sleeping.


4 posted on 04/29/2012 10:22:03 AM PDT by isthisnickcool (Sharia? No thanks!)
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To: jonascord
A lot of racers don't like a radar reflector, up high on the mast, since it might offer wind resistance.

So does my bicycle helmet BUT I NEVER ride without it and I have 2 cracked ones that demonstrate my good sense.

It is hard to aim away from anything when there is no way to see it. Shall I say that old bromide about these unfortunates; that they probably died doing what they loved?

R.I.P.

5 posted on 04/29/2012 10:30:20 AM PDT by SES1066 (Government is NOT the reason for my existence!)
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To: jonascord
You would think, doing the math, that a corner reflector for 3GHz and 10Ghz wouldn't be that big.

/johnny

6 posted on 04/29/2012 10:39:51 AM PDT by JRandomFreeper (Gone Galt)
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To: jonascord

Well, “ intelligent”, jonascord
I have a nice little airplane I bought from a guy who would remove the tie down I bolts from beneath the wings.
Said they added to the drag.
Plane can go flat out 165mph and he’s worried about the 1/100th of a mph from some damn “tie down I bolts”?
Folks are foolish, a radar reflector can be made with little resistance.


7 posted on 04/29/2012 10:41:25 AM PDT by Joe Boucher ((FUBO) Hey Mitt, F-you too pal)
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To: Joe Boucher
Yeah, since I replied the first time, I've been working on a design for a foil paper oragami reflector for those frequencies that can be put inside a transparent (at 3 and 10 Ghz) lightweight housing with low drag.

I'm fresh on the RF equations, but the Reynolds numbers/aerodynamic stuff is rusty.

/johnny

8 posted on 04/29/2012 10:46:29 AM PDT by JRandomFreeper (Gone Galt)
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To: Lurker
One thing I learned from my boat owning days is that any body of water will try very, very hard to kill you.

I still remember falling into a pool at 5 years old, unable to swim. Nobody saw me. I was lucky I was next to the ladder, saw it, and just climbed up and out like nothing happened. I was more worried about getting in trouble with parents than anything else.

After being out on an 18 ft skiboat in Little Traverse Bay when a storm started to hit (Lake Michigan), I have a real healthy respect for water.

9 posted on 04/29/2012 11:22:16 AM PDT by Darren McCarty (The Republican Party is bigger than the presidency.)
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To: BenLurkin

AIS would have helped. A radar reflector *could* have helped, but even good ones don’t really give a sailing yacht a good signature. I would not be surprised if the bridge on the freighter was unoccupied.


10 posted on 04/29/2012 11:28:02 AM PDT by dinodino
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To: BenLurkin

And why was there no lookout on the sailboat? Or maybe they thought it was the oceangoing ships responsibility to look out for them and avoid them. Everyone in their bunks and the boat on autopilot? If you’re going to sea, you need to have a watch 24 hours per day. Please don’t tell me about the ones who have done it single-handed and made it around the world. They were idiots.


11 posted on 04/29/2012 11:30:43 AM PDT by navyblue (<u>)
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To: dinodino

I would be very surprised if there was nobody on the bridge of the ship. It just is not done with professional seamen on big ships. There is an officer on the bridge 24/7 and a lookout at night. I don’t think you know much about big ships.


12 posted on 04/29/2012 11:39:30 AM PDT by navyblue (<u>)
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To: Joe Boucher
Boaters and pilots aren't always intelligent. Particularly wealthy ones. They didn't call the 310 Twin Cessna the "doctor killer" for nothing. They couldn't yell their way out of IFR conditions, and the artificial horizon didn't care that they had been to Harvard Med School.

Someone, I forget who, once said that if you treat the sea with contempt, it will quickly kill you.

I'm not willing to say that they didn't have a reflector hoisted. Most race rules require them, for ocean racing, as well as EPIRBs and full life rafts. However, all you have to do is look at Hollywood to see that massive wads of cash does not automatically impart Total Knowledge.

Remember the Mark Twain story in "Life On The Mississippi" when,as a pilot, he ran over a log raft, because the crew had taken the required lantern into the shelter? Stupid is forever.

13 posted on 04/29/2012 11:43:25 AM PDT by jonascord (Any Democrat = Classic examples of the Downing Effect.)
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To: isthisnickcool

We used to have big boats and fished far off the Texas coast in the Gulf. We would NEVER do that, some one was awake and at the helm every minute! When we planned a trip 100+ miles off shore we left about 3 AM went slowly until it was light and then hooked ‘em up. Same if we were after dark coming home. You can hit a floating tree trunk or a barrel or any manner of floating junk. I am surprised to hear that your moron friends are still alive.


14 posted on 04/29/2012 11:48:42 AM PDT by Ditter
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To: navyblue

I’m not saying there was nobody *physically* on the bridge, I’m saying that whomever was on watch was not paying attention. Perhaps you are unaware, but it’s common knowledge amongst yachtsmen that freighters often run us over without stopping.


15 posted on 04/29/2012 12:20:46 PM PDT by dinodino
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To: Joe Boucher
Well, “ intelligent”, jonascord
I have a nice little airplane I bought from a guy who would remove the tie down I bolts from beneath the wings.
Said they added to the drag.
Plane can go flat out 165mph and he’s worried about the 1/100th of a mph from some damn “tie down I bolts”?
Folks are foolish, a radar reflector can be made with little resistance.


Bad comparison.

The tie down rings do nothing in flight and can be easily screwed in for tie down on the ground.

A radar reflector is a safety issue while moving. I bet the pane owner you mention never removed his transponder to save weight or the transponder antenna to reduce drag.

But in this case the yacht was being tracked by the race officials, and since all large boats require tracking systems, I would think that the collision must have be recorded in some way.

16 posted on 04/29/2012 12:39:54 PM PDT by az_gila
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To: BenLurkin

Was a Kennedy at the helm of the yacht? They have a history of getting their boats run over by slower ships.


17 posted on 04/29/2012 12:47:38 PM PDT by eartrumpet
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To: Joe Boucher
a radar reflector can be made with little resistance

Agreed, put it inside a glass ball and call it a Christmas tree ornament...

Regards,
GtG

18 posted on 04/29/2012 3:33:56 PM PDT by Gandalf_The_Gray (I live in my own little world, I like it 'cuz they know me here.)
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To: dinodino
but it’s common knowledge amongst yachtsmen that freighters often run us over without stopping

I always thought that "the laws of the sea" gave right of way to the sail boat over the power boat. Of course that can get problematical when the "power boat" is an oil tanker that takes a half mile to change direction.

Regards,
GtG

19 posted on 04/29/2012 3:42:51 PM PDT by Gandalf_The_Gray (I live in my own little world, I like it 'cuz they know me here.)
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To: BenLurkin
Here is a link with a picture of the boat in question:

Daily Breeze

I can't see up the mast far enough to see if they had radar, but I would be surprised if they didn't. This is a newish Hunter 376 and from the look of the size of the helmsman station console it was probably fully equipped. I've transited the Ensenada to San Diego area at night on a radar equipped sailboat and it can get crowded with fishing boats and who knows what. With a four man crew they probably had two crew on watch at all times during the night.

20 posted on 04/29/2012 3:47:50 PM PDT by Dan Cooper
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To: Dan Cooper; All
Many thanks Dan Cooper!


21 posted on 04/29/2012 3:54:14 PM PDT by BenLurkin (This is not a statement of fact. It is either opinion or satire; or both)
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To: Gandalf_The_Gray

When I was an officer in the Navy, we followed what my Captain called the “steel, wood, fiberglass” rule. We were steel and the top of the chain and the concept is based on the “Rule of Gross Tonnage”. I was on a submarine and when we came into port we were pretty much limited to the channel. Many pleasure boats would come over to take a look and there was no way we could maneuver even if we wanted to.


22 posted on 04/29/2012 4:00:22 PM PDT by wfu_deacons
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To: BenLurkin

Another thing is that I don’t see the crew wearing any life vests. That usually is required at all times on deck in a race.


23 posted on 04/29/2012 11:04:48 PM PDT by Dan Cooper
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To: Gandalf_The_Gray

Generally true, but not if the other vessel is constrained by maneuverability or draft. Anyway, if a sailboat is struck by a freighter, the sailors will be lucky to survive to make their case in maritime court.


24 posted on 04/30/2012 12:41:51 PM PDT by dinodino
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To: BenLurkin

Lots of very large cruise ships in those waters. Could make a mess of a small sailing vessel.


25 posted on 04/30/2012 12:48:47 PM PDT by Churchillspirit (9/11/2001. NEVER FORGET.)
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To: navyblue

Maybe not, but I know that there are three sailors dead due to a collision with commercial shipping, and the commercial vessel didn’t stop.

The yacht in question had a radar reflector, by the way.


26 posted on 04/30/2012 1:06:33 PM PDT by dinodino
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To: navyblue

Maybe not, but I know that there are three sailors dead due to a collision with commercial shipping, and the commercial vessel didn’t stop.


27 posted on 04/30/2012 1:07:51 PM PDT by dinodino
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