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Future USS IOWA Museum
Pacific Battleship Center ^ | 4/2012 | Pacific Battleship Center

Posted on 05/12/2012 9:47:50 AM PDT by bigbob

Future USS IOWA Museum

The ship will be presented as a “living” ship, which provides “at sea” experiences. Auditory and visual backgrounds, interactive exhibits, and commemorative information will help visitors to understand the history and function of the USS IOWA over 50 years of service.

Key exhibits include:

The History of Gunner Ships from the Year 1400 to Present

History of the USS IOWA

History of U.S. Battleships

History of Allied and Axis Battleships

Rotating exhibits of particular interest

Battleship Research Library

Containing the most comprehensive library of every battleship built in the world, the library will be useful for students of battleship history as well as research scholars and enthusiasts. This will also be the center of our Oral History program, capturing the personal experiences of the service personnel who served on these ships.


TOPICS: History
KEYWORDS: battleship; iowa; ussiowa; ussiowamuseum
Leaving Richmond for Southern California May 20, 2012!

Great to see this historic ship being preserved in this way. A little USS Iowa history via Wikipedia:

Iowa is the last lead ship of any class of United States battleships, and was the only ship of her class to have served in the Atlantic Ocean during World War II.

During World War II, she carried President Franklin D. Roosevelt across the Atlantic to Casablanca en route to a crucial 1943 meeting in Tehran with British Prime Minister Winston Churchill and Soviet leader Josef Stalin. She has a bathtub — an amenity installed for Roosevelt, along with an elevator to shuttle him between decks. When transferred to the Pacific Fleet in 1944, Iowa shelled beachheads at Kwajalein and Eniwetok in advance of Allied amphibious landings and screened aircraft carriers operating in the Marshall Islands. She also served as the Third Fleet flagship, flying Adm. William F. Halsey's flag at the Japanese surrender in Tokyo Bay. During the Korean War, Iowa was involved in raids on the North Korean coast, after which she was decommissioned into the United States Navy reserve fleets, better known as the "mothball fleet." She was reactivated in 1984 as part of the 600-ship Navy plan, and operated in both the Atlantic and Pacific Fleets to counter the recently expanded Soviet Navy. In April 1989, an explosion of undetermined origin wrecked her #2 gun turret, killing 47 sailors.

Iowa was decommissioned for the last time in 1990, and was initially struck from the Naval Vessel Register in 1995. She was reinstated from 1999 to 2006 to comply with federal laws that required retention and maintenance of two Iowa-class battleships. In 2011, Iowa was donated to the Los Angeles-based non-profit Pacific Battleship Center and will be permanently moved to the Port of Los Angeles to serve as a museum and memorial to battleships.

1 posted on 05/12/2012 9:48:00 AM PDT by bigbob
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To: bigbob

My understanding is that the 1989 gun turret explosion was caused by a lovers’ quarrel between two homosexual sailors. I can’t supply details on that, so don’t ask ‘cause I can’t tell.


2 posted on 05/12/2012 9:57:42 AM PDT by ClearCase_guy (Like Emmett Till, Trayvon Martin has become simply a stick with which to beat Whites.)
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To: ClearCase_guy

Your understanding is the Navy’s official version. There have been other things that have come out over the years. The most damning is a report that the propellent bags in that turret came from a bad lot. Nothing has ever been proven that any of the sailors assigned to that turret were invoved in a sexual relationship. I believe that the propellent bags were the cause of the tragedy.


3 posted on 05/12/2012 10:18:32 AM PDT by sean327 (God created all men equal, then some become Marines!)
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To: ClearCase_guy

Your understanding is the Navy’s official version. There have been other things that have come out over the years. The most damning is a report that the propellent bags in that turret came from a bad lot. Nothing has ever been proven that any of the sailors assigned to that turret were invoved in a sexual relationship. I believe that the propellent bags were the cause of the tragedy.


4 posted on 05/12/2012 10:22:26 AM PDT by sean327 (God created all men equal, then some become Marines!)
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To: bigbob

I have applied for a job to work on developing the museum when it gets to So Cal. Say a prayer for me, I really need work!


5 posted on 05/12/2012 10:23:08 AM PDT by SoCal Pubbie
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To: bigbob

If you getto Wiliongton, go see the North Carolina./

I have visited many of the ships on display and the North Carolina is definitely the best.

One day the Wisconsin at Virginia Beach may be a good display ,but right now it isn’t worth the trip.


6 posted on 05/12/2012 10:31:25 AM PDT by Venturer
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To: Venturer

I haven’t been since a kid but what few times I have ever been at the coast in SC or near NC, never could swing it. I’d like it.

I sometimes go to Patriot’s Point with the carrier and other ships.


7 posted on 05/12/2012 10:40:34 AM PDT by wally_bert (It's sheer elegance in its simplicity! - The Middleman)
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To: SoCal Pubbie

Good luck.


8 posted on 05/12/2012 11:04:26 AM PDT by fieldmarshaldj (If you like lying Socialist dirtbags, you'll love Slick Willard)
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To: Venturer
I am very disappointed the the Iowa like the Wisconsin will be berthed in a state far far from Iowa or Wisconsin. I cannot think of a single reason the Iowa cannot be on permanent display in downtown Des Moines and Wisconsin in Green Bay.
9 posted on 05/12/2012 11:07:08 AM PDT by Tupelo (GARY JOHNSON FOR PRESIDENT)
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To: Tupelo
The Wisconsin can't make it onto the Great Lakes and into Green Bay because the Welland Canal is too narrow and the ship's draft too deep.

The USS Iowa couldn't take it up the Mississippi to Davenport, let alone up the Des Moines River due to draft issues.

10 posted on 05/12/2012 11:21:00 AM PDT by Eric in the Ozarks
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To: sean327

Didn’t the Navy retract the homosexual crew story a few years after the explosion ?


11 posted on 05/12/2012 11:23:39 AM PDT by Eric in the Ozarks
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To: bigbob

When I think of the Iowa, I think of Larry and Carla Sequist... which in turn make me want to barf. Larry’s not too bad (but still a raging leftist), but Carla makes Pelosi look like a conservative.


12 posted on 05/12/2012 11:31:48 AM PDT by Cementjungle
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To: Eric in the Ozarks
When People said the gasoline engine was not dependable, did that stop Henry Ford?
When people said no one would ever go faster than the speed of sound, did that stop Chuck Yeager?
When people said no one would ever break Hank Aaron's homerun record, did that stop Barry Bonds?
No to all. So to get the Wisconsin to Wisconsin and the Iowa to Iowa, all that is required is for bright industrious people to come up with ideas. And a couple of hundred billion dollars. Or maybe a couple of trillion. We need to stop thinking small here folks.
13 posted on 05/12/2012 11:44:46 AM PDT by Tupelo (GARY JOHNSON FOR PRESIDENT)
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To: Tupelo

>>>I cannot think of a single reason the Iowa cannot be on permanent display in downtown Des Moines

Other than how in the sam hell would you get it here? Cut it up and weld it back together???


14 posted on 05/12/2012 11:49:06 AM PDT by Keith in Iowa (Willard Romney, purveyor of the world's finest bullmitt. | FR Class of 1998 |)
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To: Keith in Iowa

I bet many would say that is indeed the only option.

But we really need to keep our battleships ready, you never know when they will need to same mankind from an alien invasion when the hi tech ships fail.


15 posted on 05/12/2012 12:00:02 PM PDT by Eye of Unk (Liberals need not reply.)
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To: Keith in Iowa

Can’t we just put rockets on it and jump it from the Gulf? Nothing bad ever happens when a big ramp is around.


16 posted on 05/12/2012 12:11:53 PM PDT by gura (If Allah is so great, why does he need fat sexually confused fanboys to do his dirty work? -iowahawk)
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To: Keith in Iowa
>>>I cannot think of a single reason the Iowa cannot be on permanent display in downtown Des Moines

Other than how in the sam hell would you get it here? Cut it up and weld it back together???


17 posted on 05/12/2012 12:13:13 PM PDT by Talisker (He who commands, must obey.)
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To: Keith in Iowa

“Other than how in the sam hell would you get it here?”
Well, that is one reason.

You gotta think big.
Where is The London Bridge?
ARIZONA!


18 posted on 05/12/2012 1:07:02 PM PDT by Tupelo (GARY JOHNSON FOR PRESIDENT)
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To: Tupelo

The only thinkin’ I’m doing is you are nuttier than squirrel poop in a pecan grove... and that’s as big of thinkin’ as I’m gonna do on this subject.


19 posted on 05/12/2012 1:11:03 PM PDT by Keith in Iowa (Willard Romney, purveyor of the world's finest bullmitt. | FR Class of 1998 |)
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To: Tupelo
I am very disappointed the the Iowa like the Wisconsin will be berthed in a state far far from Iowa or Wisconsin. I cannot think of a single reason the Iowa cannot be on permanent display in downtown Des Moines and Wisconsin in Green Bay.

Iowa Class Battleship length: 890 ft

Iowa Class Battleship beam: 108 ft

Iowa Class Battleship draft: 36 ft

St. Lawrence Seaway maximum length: 740 ft

St. Lawrence Seaway maximum beam: 78 ft

St. Lawrence Seaway maximum depth: 30 ft

Do you see a problem, Sparky?

On the Mississippi you have issues of bridge heights, channel depth less than 36 ft., turns in the river which an 890 ft. ship cannot maneuver, etc. In short, no way.

20 posted on 05/12/2012 1:11:12 PM PDT by Cheburashka (It's legal to be out at night in spacesuits, even carrying a rag dolly. Cops hauled us in anyway.)
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To: sean327
No, it was not a gay lover's suicide by GMG2 Clayton Hartwig. That's the Bravo Sierra story the Navy tried to sell in their botched first investigation of the 19 April 1990 accident aboard USS IOWA (BB-61).

The second investigation was done by Sandia National Labs and points to the most likely cause. Sandia determined that a significant overram of the powder bags into the gun had occurred as they were being loaded and that the overram could have caused the explosion.

A subsequent test by the Navy of the overram scenario confirmed that an overram could have caused an explosion in the gun breech. Sandia’s technicians also found that the physical evidence did not support the Navy's theory that an electronic or chemical detonator had been used to initiate the explosion.

In response to the new findings, the Navy, with Sandia’s assistance, reopened the investigation. In August 1991, Sandia and the GAO completed their reports, concluding that the explosion was likely caused by an accidental overram of powder bags into the breech of the 16-inch gun.

The Navy, however, disagreed with Sandia’s opinion and concluded that the cause of the explosion could not be determined. The Navy expressed regret to Hartwig’s family and closed its investigation.

21 posted on 05/12/2012 1:28:58 PM PDT by MasterGunner01 (11)
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To: MasterGunner01

Thanks for the info. I forgot about the Sandia Labs tests. The Navy still screwed the pooch with their gay love cover story.


22 posted on 05/12/2012 1:36:47 PM PDT by sean327 (God created all men equal, then some become Marines!)
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To: Cheburashka

>>>Do you see a problem, Sparky?

You’re not thinking enough... how ‘bout flocks of Nyan cats and unicorns all tethered to the ships picking them up, and flying them in to their destinations...


23 posted on 05/12/2012 1:53:58 PM PDT by Keith in Iowa (Willard Romney, purveyor of the world's finest bullmitt. | FR Class of 1998 |)
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To: bigbob; mad_as_he$$

Heads up!
Thanks, D.


24 posted on 05/12/2012 6:51:27 PM PDT by sasquatch
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To: sean327

I am still burned up by the Navy’s attempt to blame a deadman for this accident, GMG2 Clayton Hartwig. What the Navy did to the Hartwig family at their time if grief is unconscionable and despicable. The Navy brass who authored this attempted cover-up should be hunged from a yardarm.


25 posted on 05/12/2012 7:51:31 PM PDT by MasterGunner01 (11)
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To: MasterGunner01

Scandia did not determine the gun was over rammed. That was obvious from the first day of the investigation. Scandias test methodology used to create a spontanious detonation of a powder bag cannot be duplicated in a MK VII gun. They tinkered the with trim layer in a powder bag then hoisted it to various heights with crane then dropped the bag onto a concrete slab. they got one bag to detonate out of over a hundred tests. The Navy’s conclusion that Hartwig intentionally over rammed the load, was circumstantian at best, and could not be proven. However, he was the gun captain, and he was the man that controlled the ramming of the projo and powder.


26 posted on 05/13/2012 3:25:41 AM PDT by X Fretensis
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To: Tupelo

I can, how to you get it there?


27 posted on 05/13/2012 8:32:32 AM PDT by thatjoeguy (MAYDAY! MAYDAY! We are so going in ! !)
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To: Cheburashka

You forgot 1 other important fact. The ship will draw even more depth from being in fresh water. It might even sink! j/k


28 posted on 05/13/2012 8:44:08 AM PDT by US_MilitaryRules (Unnngh! To many PDS people!)
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To: X Fretensis
The gun captain oversees the operation of the gun loading and firing. However, he does NOT control the actual ramming of the projectile and powder bags. Physical control and length of rammer stroke is done by the rammerman.

A 16-inch turret internally is divided into four sections: the turret officer's booth and three gun houses. The gun houses are separated from each other and the turret officer's booth by flameproof bulkheads and doors. Each gun house contains four men: gun captain (plugman), powder hoist operator, cradle operator, and rammerman.

Each gun house is its own world composed of the plugman (gun captain) who opens and closes the breech plug of the gun, wipes the face of the breech plug clean after each shot, and inserts the combination electric-percussion primer (they resemble a brass shotgun shell) in the plug's firing lock prior to firing, and is in overall charge.

The cradle operator controls the cradle and spanning tray for the projectile and powder bags.

The powder hoist operator controls the powder hoist and powder hoist door.

The rammerman controls the actual ramming of the projectile and powder bags (two loads of three 110 lb. bags) into the gun chamber for a total of 660 lbs. of powder.

To load, the gun goes to 5 degrees. The plugman (gun captain) lowers the breech plug and that initiates a blast of high pressure air into the gun chamber to physically blowout any residual embers or powder bag residue. After the gun captain visually verifies a clear bore and wipes the breech plug face of any firing residue, he orders the projectile loaded.

The projectile is at the top of the shell hoist and supported by the cradle. The cradle operator pushes the button to lower the cradle and extend the spanner tray. The gun captain orders the projectile rammed and the rammerman extends the rammer chain to push and seat the projectile into the end of the gun chamber. The rammerman retracts the rammer, ready for powder bag loading.

With the powder car loaded with six bags of powder and at the ready position (UP), the powder hoist operator opens the hoist door and three powder bags are ejected onto the tray. The hoist operator closes the door and the hoist cycles to bring the second set of powder bags for loading.

The hoist operator verifies the RED dyed end of each powder bag (ignition pad) all face way from the gun breech. The gun captain orders the first load of powder bags rammed. The rammerman extends the rammer to insert the first three bags of powder into the breech so the leading bag rests against the base of the projectile. The rammerman retracts the rammer.

The powder hoist operator opens the hoist door to eject the second set of powder bags onto the tray, closes the door and the hoist powder car returns to the powder handling room for reloading. The hoist operator visually checks the powder bags so each RED dyed pad on the powder bags face away from the breech.

The gun captain orders the second load of powder bags rammed. The rammerman extends the rammer to push the second group of three powder bags into the gun chamber. The stroke is adjusted so the top of the third bag touches the ignition pad of the fourth bag in the chamber (as referenced to the face of the chamber). The rammerman retracts the rammer.

The gun captain orders the cradle retracted and the cradle operator pushes the button to raise the cradle and retract the spanner tray. When the cradle is in its fully UP position, the projectile hoist brings a new projectile for loading. The gun captain inserts the combination primer into the breech plug firing lock and closes the lock to assure electrical contact by the firing pin. The 16-inch gun is now ready to fire when the trigger is closed in the turret officer's booth or by main battery fire control.

The rammerman controls the length of the rammer chain stroke to load the projectile, first and second sets of powder bags. The length of stroke is adjustable and the rammerman references an indicator that tells him the length of the stroke. If he misreads the indicator or slips up and does not remember the number of bags already loaded, he will get an over-ram of the powder bags. This can (and has) produced enough internal friction within the powder bags’ stacked propellant sticks to cause ignition of the powder. The result is a flash back of 660 lbs. of burning propellant and certain death for the gun house crew.

The Navy knew this condition was possible on the 16”/50 guns of the Iowa-class because they had duplicated the over-ram flashback condition on a Baltimore-class 8”/55 bag gun.

29 posted on 05/13/2012 9:13:45 AM PDT by MasterGunner01 (11)
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