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Vanity -- computer question
Self

Posted on 06/12/2012 2:57:35 PM PDT by saminfl

I have a new Dell desktop with Windows 7 operating system. There are certain features about that system i hate, such as Windows Live mail. Can I install the hard drive from my old Dell Desktop with XP Professional into a vacant slot and boot from that when i want to?


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1 posted on 06/12/2012 2:57:45 PM PDT by saminfl
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To: saminfl

Why not just disable WLM?


2 posted on 06/12/2012 3:03:31 PM PDT by PeaceBeWithYou (De Oppresso Liber! (50 million and counting in Afghanistan and Iraq))
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To: saminfl

Why not just disable WLM?


3 posted on 06/12/2012 3:03:31 PM PDT by PeaceBeWithYou (De Oppresso Liber! (50 million and counting in Afghanistan and Iraq))
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To: saminfl

This does not answer your question directly but I run Office 2003 including Outlook on my Windows 7 laptop. Works just fine.


4 posted on 06/12/2012 3:04:18 PM PDT by UB355 (Slower traffic keep right)
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To: saminfl

You can turn off features you don’t like in windows 7,don’t see Windows live mail in my version?


5 posted on 06/12/2012 3:04:55 PM PDT by mdittmar
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To: saminfl
Can I install the hard drive from my old Dell Desktop with XP Professional into a vacant slot and boot from that when i want to?

I don't think so. Windows is finicky about the boot sectors of the drives. It would be great if you could, though.

6 posted on 06/12/2012 3:05:18 PM PDT by Cyber Liberty (Obama considers the Third World morally superior to the United States.)
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To: saminfl

I believe that I saw something about booting from an auxiliary hard drive on Kim Komando’s website. Go to komando.com and do a search. You might get lucky.


7 posted on 06/12/2012 3:11:52 PM PDT by davisfh
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To: saminfl
"Can I install the hard drive from my old Dell Desktop with XP Professional into a vacant slot and boot from that when i want to?"

Unfortunately no, not without a lot of very hairy and very difficult tweaking.

But, you can, with little difficulty, uninstall or disable Windows live mail.

If you have not yet installed a second hard drive for backups, you should do so. Then back up the entire C drive, so you can restore it if you really mess up some day.

8 posted on 06/12/2012 3:14:07 PM PDT by Ron C.
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To: saminfl

Yes.

When the machine first starts after a boot, you’ll see some sort of Dell screen and somewhere on it you’ll which which function key (F1, F2, etc.) you need to press at that point (before it starts booting windows off the hard drive) in order to go into Setup mode. (something like F12=Setup).

If you’re not quick enough, the BIOS will finish doing it’s thing and start booting Windows from the hard drive. You’ve got to be pretty quick. If you miss it and Windows starts booting, you can usually hold down Ctrl-Alt-Delete simultaneously (3-finger salute) which will Reset the machine so it starts booting again without stopping the power going to the mother board so the disk drives will not spin down but just have their initialization routine called by the boot as they normally do.

Once you successfully hit the setup key during the BIOS boot routines, that will put you into the BIOS (firmware on a chip on the motherboard) setup program. It will be a fairly straightforward menu navigation. There will be a menu option that says something like Boot Options; you can select that and somewhere on that screen change the order in which boot devices are attempted.

Do a Save and Exit, which will do another system restart and boot off the devices as you directed it to in Setup.

Of course, you have to physically install the hard drive first for it to be seen by the BIOS Setup.


9 posted on 06/12/2012 3:15:54 PM PDT by PieterCasparzen (We have to fix things ourselves.)
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To: saminfl

I might be saying something you already know but never let Windows handle your e-mail. Presently, I am using Mozilla Thunderbird which is free and has enough functionality to serve most needs. Anytime I had crashes under Outlook or Outlook Express, the saved e-mails were no longer recoverable.

For older users, there is a freeware program called Calypso that did very well on my older Windows NT system.


10 posted on 06/12/2012 3:23:17 PM PDT by OrangeHoof (Our economy won't heal until one particular black man is unemployed.)
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To: saminfl
Can I install the hard drive from my old Dell Desktop with XP Professional into a vacant slot and boot from that when i want to?

You can do that, however, it may not work due to driver issues. Video is usually a problem, as well as audio, network, etc,etc. You may get a blue screen of death as well if you try it.

If it gives you problems try booting in safe mode with it, then install the correct drivers to match your new machine.

11 posted on 06/12/2012 3:23:36 PM PDT by unixfox (Abolish Slavery, Repeal The 16th Amendment!)
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To: saminfl

Usually there’s a place in the BIOS Boot Options to tell it

a) whether or not to present a menu of boot devices (this will make the machine wait for the user to select a boot device)

b) also how long to wait on the boot menu for the user to select a boot device when booting. Once the wait time has expired, the machine will simply boot off the default device.

Typically you make the wait time pretty sure to save time at boot time and you select the default device you really want to be the default. This way you don’t have to do anything during the boot and it avoids a long wait for user input.


12 posted on 06/12/2012 3:26:22 PM PDT by PieterCasparzen (We have to fix things ourselves.)
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To: PieterCasparzen

bump. There’ll never be another XP.


13 posted on 06/12/2012 3:30:26 PM PDT by the invisib1e hand (they have no god but caesar)
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To: PieterCasparzen

Not necessarily. While it is possible to set up a system to boot from alternate boot devices, the problem is going to be the drivers. I am sure there will be different hardware in the new system than was in the old system - just how different will determine if you will be successful. And even if you can get it to boot, you would probably not have full functionality.

You would be better off doing a clean install of XP on the new system, assuming that you can find the XP drivers for the hardware on the new system.


14 posted on 06/12/2012 3:30:51 PM PDT by CA Conservative (Texan by birth, Californian by circumstance)
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To: saminfl

Here is a decent article for setting up a dual boot.
http://www.sevenforums.com/tutorials/8057-dual-boot-installation-windows-7-xp.html
Adding a hard drive from another machine is a bit trickier.
You’ll need to remove all system drivers, video, sound, etc. then boot off your XP disc and do a repair.
With that completed, you simply reinstall all the system drivers.
Of course, this assumes you have a bootable XP installation CD.
As it’s a Dell, chances are you only have a recovery CD.


15 posted on 06/12/2012 3:31:47 PM PDT by astyanax (Liberalism: Logic's retarded cousin.)
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To: saminfl

There are some work arounds.

You might consider running XP on a virtual machine in your Win7 system.


16 posted on 06/12/2012 3:34:14 PM PDT by dadgum (Overjoyed to be the Pariah.)
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To: saminfl

I feel your pain. XP is a wonderful thing.
But why do major fiddling with a machine when you can just tool around in basic tool functions and disable what you don’t like?
Get Thunderbird (free and easy email program from Mozilla) and avoid Live mail, hotmail, and any other Windows thing you can avoid easily.

Windows7 will grow on you. It’s Windows8 you should fear and loathe!


17 posted on 06/12/2012 3:37:54 PM PDT by Lady Lucky (God-issued, not govt-issued.)
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To: saminfl

Probably not.

You would need to be sure that you have the proper drivers for your new hardware installed on your XP drive. And depending on the age of your old system, they might very well be incompatible. More to the point, and older ATA drive is not hardware compatible with a SATA system, without some sort of adapter.

It is possible that if you have a new system that Dell would offer a “downgrade” to XP - They will do that on certain business class systems. Dell may also have XP hardware drivers that you could install on the old drive to allow you to boot to it, but that’s fairly complicated. However, if you do that, you may be able to set up a “Dual Boot” system.

Another thing to consider is that if you have more than 4GB of RAM, it won’t be usable on an XP (32bit) system.

Mark


18 posted on 06/12/2012 3:40:44 PM PDT by MarkL (Do I really look like a guy with a plan?)
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To: Cyber Liberty; saminfl
Can I install the hard drive from my old Dell Desktop with XP Professional into a vacant slot and boot from that when i want to?
I don't think so. Windows is finicky about the boot sectors of the drives. It would be great if you could, though.


I did exactly what you're talking about Sam, not on a Dell system mind you, but on an ASUS motherboard, here's how you should be able to do it:

- assuming that your hard drives are SATA and not IDE (thereby requiring NO 'master' or 'slave' jumper settings), slide that XP drive into a slot, run the SATA cable to the motherboard, be sure the power coupling is connected as well.

- after you button everything up, when you first power up your system, be SURE to hit the 'DEL' (delete) key to go into the BIOS setup function.

- once you're into the BIOS, look for the hard drive/boot configuration menu, and select your XP drive as 'boot', hit 'escape' and 'save' and leave the BIOS menu, wait for the system to boot back up. When it does, you SHOULD see your old XP boot screen and desktop after everything is up and running. When you click on 'My Computer' you should see the Windows 7 drive designated as either 'D' (or perhaps 'E', if XP assigns your optical drive to the next available letter).

Now if you're REALLY REALLY lucky, when you first boot up the system after installing the XP drive, you MIGHT see a message during bootup that says 'hit F*' key for boot menu' (with '*' being the corresponding number of the function key designated), if you hit that function key, you may very well see a little menu pop up that lets you choose from whatever drive devices are present in the hardware configuration to boot from, i.e., you may be able to boot from 'C' (Windows 7), from 'D' (Windows XP), etc. If you choose 'D', Windows 7 will be seen as 'D', and likewise if you choose 'C' for Windows 7, the XP drive will (or should be) designated as 'D'.

Both Windows 7 and XP use a common file system, 'NTFS' although I have heard that there are some subtle differences but I've never discovered them and I run both Win7 and XP on a daily basis.

Anyhow, hope this helps some, FReepmail me if there is anything else I might help with.


Important PS: be aware that depending upon the hardware/motherboard configuration of your old Dell desktop, there may be a conflict in drivers if you're using that drive in a newer system. Even if that is the case, you should be able to select the appropriate drivers that will work with your older XP operating system and the newer hardware that you have now. It can be tricky, but it is doable.
19 posted on 06/12/2012 3:50:50 PM PDT by mkjessup (Eternal Vigilance (aka FReeper Tom Hoefling) has my vote for President in 2012.)
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To: ShadowAce

PING for the Tech list...


20 posted on 06/12/2012 3:52:29 PM PDT by CedarDave (Voted for Newt last Tuesday in New Mexico -- too bad he's thrown in with Mittens)
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To: saminfl

If the old drive is SATA you could do it but things could get ugly. It won’t have drivers for any of the new stuff, which probably includes the network adapter, which makes it difficult to get the drivers. Just turn off the stuff you don’t like, with the search that’s in 7 finding things and killing them is easier than ever.


21 posted on 06/12/2012 3:58:48 PM PDT by discostu (Listen, do you smell something?)
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To: saminfl

Find another mail client..try Thunderbird mail.


22 posted on 06/12/2012 4:13:37 PM PDT by The Great RJ
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To: saminfl

“Can I install the hard drive from my old Dell Desktop with XP Professional into a vacant slot and boot from that when i want to?’

You could probably put your windows XP on a thumb drive and boot off of that.


23 posted on 06/12/2012 4:14:10 PM PDT by babygene (Figures don't lie, but liars can figure...)
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To: CedarDave
PING for the Tech list..

Speaking of computers and Tech help, I wonder if it'd be possible to have a computer help forum---or maybe we do and I just haven't seen it?

24 posted on 06/12/2012 4:14:24 PM PDT by mupcat
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To: discostu

Exactly. XP is obsolete and I’m sure this guy has a SATA drive. Just get rid of Windows Live Mail.


25 posted on 06/12/2012 4:17:24 PM PDT by gura (If Allah is so great, why does he need fat sexually confused fanboys to do his dirty work? -iowahawk)
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To: saminfl
Take a real leap and try linux, maybe "Fedora"
26 posted on 06/12/2012 4:22:45 PM PDT by st.eqed
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To: saminfl

You can’t just put the drive from one computer into another and have it boot from that because of the differences in motherboards, chip sets, drivers, etc. unless the systems are totally identical. You could put it in and access the data on it as a secondary drive, though.


27 posted on 06/12/2012 4:31:05 PM PDT by bamagirl1944 (That's short for Alabama, not Obama)
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To: saminfl
I struggled with bloatware on Windows systems for years when I bought a MacBook Pro just over a year ago. The system came completely clean and I got to only add what I wanted. As a result, the computer is still lightning fast and runs incredibly fast with zero bloatware.

I downloaded an application I wasn't too crazy about and when I moved the icon to the trash can, it disappeared without a trace leaving zero remnants behind.

I know I sound like an Apple fanboy but there you go. This is my experience with my first Apple system.

28 posted on 06/12/2012 4:41:11 PM PDT by SamAdams76
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To: CA Conservative; saminfl
Not necessarily. While it is possible to set up a system to boot from alternate boot devices, the problem is going to be the drivers. I am sure there will be different hardware in the new system than was in the old system - just how different will determine if you will be successful.

Well, the drive will be the same, it will be the same O/S and same drive that ran fine on the old machine. What are the other basics - keyboard, mouse, video. Should be fine, IMHO.

If video looks ugly, use XP Control Panel, Display to select the right settings (kick the soda machine till it works).

IMHO, XP was always fine for me with it figuring out hardware on it's own or with a little tweak. I never had a monitor that was so odd that it needed special drivers downloaded under XP.

If the video is still a problem - take the old card out of the old machine, install it in the new one. Plug the old monitor into it. Now you've got the same video hardware on the new machine.

I lost track of Windows a while back, I'm just on CentOS now. Industrial strength, same simpleton "windowsy" look and feel, and free. OpenOffice gives me access to all the Word docs, Excel sheets, etc. Blows the doors off of messing with M$. And I can search around, do a little homework and figure out how to turn off and uninstall unnecessary services and other software, and turn off cookies, etc., in Mozilla/Firefox, so the dang machine IGNORES any and all hack attempts as long as I don't open any unknown emails. Evolution works fine for email. IMHO...
29 posted on 06/12/2012 4:42:57 PM PDT by PieterCasparzen (We have to fix things ourselves.)
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To: astyanax; saminfl
Adding a hard drive from another machine is a bit trickier.

Dual booting with 2 physical drives sitting in the same PC, is I think what he's talking about. I've done it with CentOS and XP. one physical drive is XP, one physical drive is CentOS.

At startup, the PCs BIOS prompts you for which physical drive you want to boot from.

Whichever drive you booted from, that's the O/S that's running. The other drive just sat there spinning, uselessly. XP could not understand the CentOS drive. CentOS could have enabled me to do stuff with the XP drive but I did not want to.
30 posted on 06/12/2012 4:50:00 PM PDT by PieterCasparzen (We have to fix things ourselves.)
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To: CedarDave
While there is so much tech genius visiting this thread, may I ask a laptop question? ...

I have a Toshiba laptop that I really used a lot. Unfortunately the slot into which the hard drive slit broke and now the hard drive will not make full contact with the slot tabs. I tried to use an external that has a UBS cable but the laptop will not boot from the USB port. Is it possible to solder a new slot onto the laptop in the pocket or does t require a whole new mother board? Blasted Toshiba set up seems to have this weak point where the hard drives are connected to their motherboards ...

31 posted on 06/12/2012 5:17:51 PM PDT by MHGinTN (Being deceived can be cured.)
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To: PieterCasparzen

“Yes.

When the machine first starts after a boot, you’ll see some sort of Dell screen and somewhere on it you’ll which which function key (F1, F2, etc.) you need to press at that point (before it starts booting windows off the hard drive) in order to go into Setup mode. (something like F12=Setup).”

That will let him physically boot off the drive, but the drivers installed on that copy of Windows will all be for the old machine. It almost certainly won’t work. If it (by some miracle) manages to boot, there will be no telling regarding crashes and corrupted data.


32 posted on 06/12/2012 5:20:16 PM PDT by PreciousLiberty (Pray for America!!!)
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To: PieterCasparzen; saminfl

I think it’s much easier than what Pieter said. Newer Dell computers all have a boot selection ability built-in to the BIOS (I believe it is the F12 Key, labeled “Selective Startup” or something of that nature. Just press that during Startup, I believe you need to do it at the time the “Dell” screen displays, but before the Windows logon screen appears. Then, it will allow you to select the drive you want to boot from, overriding the default boot option on a one-time basis without editing the regular BIOS settings.

I know for certain you can use this to tell it to boot from a CD or a floppy, but I have not actually tried it to boot from a second hard drive with its own boot sector, but I think it should work just fine.


33 posted on 06/12/2012 5:47:15 PM PDT by Boogieman
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To: bamagirl1944

Hmmm, I don’t think it would be as difficult as you think. I just did a clean Windows install on a Dell, and it boots up fine without the chipset, video, etc drivers installed. You install all of those from the resource CD after you boot to Windows. Until then, it operated on default drivers included in Windows. I’d imagine it would be a similar operation with the old HD, but he might have to boot the old drive in safe mode the first time in order to get the default drivers to function instead of the ones from his old system.

Of course, he will need to make sure the drivers on his resource CD include the XP drivers. Dell resource CD’s usually have drivers for multiple similar models included on the same disk, so they might include drivers for legacy OS’s as well, but I can’t say for certain.


34 posted on 06/12/2012 5:58:42 PM PDT by Boogieman
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To: astyanax

Luckily, you usually can make a bootable installation CD from a machine where XP is already loaded:

http://www.howtohaven.com/system/createwindowssetupdisk.shtml


35 posted on 06/12/2012 6:01:24 PM PDT by Boogieman
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To: MHGinTN

I’m sure it’s “possible”, after all, someone soldered those parts to the motherboard in the first place. Whether it’s something advisable to try on your own is another matter.

But, look at it this way. You’ve got a pretty much useless computer sitting there. At worst, if you try to replace the slot and screw up and damage the motherboard, you will just have to replace the motherboard anyway. You’d only be out the cost of the spare slot. At best, you succeed and save the price of the new motherboard.


36 posted on 06/12/2012 6:06:58 PM PDT by Boogieman
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To: PreciousLiberty; saminfl

Many folks seem to think that XP won’t detect new hardware an allow reconfiguration as necessary. Knowing M$ there may be some problem or another. I’m no windows expert.

I was working with a new drive that was a clean install; the old drive was still in the original machine, where you’re asking about putting the old drive in a new machine.

To be safe, you of course need backup copies of everything you want off your old XP drive first. I would always test the backups prior to trusting them and make at least two. Both new and old machines are Dell. I’m curious if the network would work.

Then you need a clean XP bootable install on media that the new machine can handle (DVD, etc.) (I’d boot from it to make sure the install starts ok, then reboot before I got too far).

As far as video drivers, I’m assuming you can get it to use the standard VGA driver and that your hardware will support that. XP is a little over 10 years old - is your old machine older than that ?

If you have good backups, and your new XP install media, you could attempt sticking the old drive in the new machine and booting from it.

If that fails too badly to continue, and you can’t get it set up nicely, you could install XP fresh over top of the old drive then copy your files from your backup onto the new XP install.


37 posted on 06/12/2012 6:29:53 PM PDT by PieterCasparzen (We have to fix things ourselves.)
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To: saminfl
I have a new Dell desktop with Windows 7 operating system.


38 posted on 06/12/2012 7:53:53 PM PDT by martin_fierro (< |:)~)
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To: rdb3; Calvinist_Dark_Lord; Salo; JosephW; Only1choice____Freedom; amigatec; stylin_geek; ...

39 posted on 06/13/2012 4:18:58 AM PDT by ShadowAce (Linux -- The Ultimate Windows Service Pack)
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To: rdb3; Calvinist_Dark_Lord; Salo; JosephW; Only1choice____Freedom; amigatec; stylin_geek; ...

40 posted on 06/13/2012 4:19:19 AM PDT by ShadowAce (Linux -- The Ultimate Windows Service Pack)
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To: OrangeHoof

How does Mozilla Thunderbird compare with Gmail?


41 posted on 06/13/2012 4:41:54 AM PDT by PapaNew
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To: the invisib1e hand

Wasn’t XP conceived and created while Bill Gates fingerprints were still all over Microsoft?


42 posted on 06/13/2012 4:44:31 AM PDT by PapaNew
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To: martin_fierro

That’s funny.


43 posted on 06/13/2012 4:48:25 AM PDT by PapaNew
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To: saminfl

Why not use Mozilla Thunderbird as your default mail client? Or just eschew a local mail client altogether and use the online interfaces? Going back to WinXP will open you up to a host of compatibility and security issues. Win7 is a good OS.


44 posted on 06/13/2012 4:52:36 AM PDT by Future Snake Eater (CrossFit.com)
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To: mupcat
Speaking of computers and Tech help, I wonder if it'd be possible to have a computer help forum---or maybe we do and I just haven't seen it?

You're on it. Shadowace is the keeper of the list. Freepmail him and ask to be added. My post was to notify him of this thread so he could make the rest of the list aware of it so they could join in the discussion if they wish.

45 posted on 06/13/2012 7:07:34 AM PDT by CedarDave (Voted for Newt last Tuesday in New Mexico -- too bad he's thrown in with Mittens)
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To: saminfl
Trying to boot Windows on different hardware from an old disk is problematic and IMO ultimately futire. Even if Windows does succeed and reconfigure itself and come up, it will run slower after it manages to rejigger everything. And you'll have continuing issues with activation and licensing, on Windows and any apps that key off the old hardware.

I've done it in the past. It's painful, not pretty, and overall it's a lot easier to just bite the bullet and deal with the new system as such. At least in my experience.

46 posted on 06/13/2012 7:56:00 AM PDT by dayglored (Listen, strange women lying in ponds distributing swords is no basis for a system of government!)
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To: saminfl

Install Windows Virtual PC and Run XP Mode. Outlook express is there, however I have no problems with Windows Live. I do use XP Mode for a couple of apps that won’t run in Windows 7.


47 posted on 06/13/2012 8:36:37 AM PDT by w1andsodidwe (Barrak has now won the contest. He is even worse than Jimmah.)
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To: saminfl
While what you are asking is technically possible, it is not advisable.

Understand that if your machine is a 64bit box, and your old XP system is 32bit (which is likely), you will certainly lose performance, and that in a very noticeable way, as XP will not be able to use the full capability of the CPU, and will only be able to use 3 gigs of RAM - This is not necessarily a game-changer, but it is certainly not the best scenario - You will want to be able to use the machine to it's full capacity.

If you still want to move forward, it would certainly be best to pay a service tech to do the retrofit, and it will probably save you a lot of headaches. This is not an easy thing to do.

Before even beginning, do the research to figure out whether XP drivers are available for that specific machine... You can do that by looking the machine up on dell to see if Dell provides legacy drivers for it. I will bet you dollars to donuts that XP drivers are not available, as that is most often the case. If the drivers are not available, you are just boned.

Then one must be sure that the old drive will fit the new slot - one may be a PATA (old) style drive, while the new box will certainly be a SATA (new style drive) - If your old drive doesn't fit, the work is doubled... still technically possible, but one would have to obtain a drive that would work, and image your old drive onto it - A pretty technical adventure for one who is uninitiated.

Lastly, while one can hack the registry from Safe Mode to remove the vestiges of your old machine drivers, allowing the box to detect new hardware on boot, it is never the best way to do it - A clean install is proper, and most likely to be a successful process. So IF you do decide to retrograde the system, starting from scratch install would be my recommendation. You will need the XP key from your old machine, and an XP setup disk (probably OEM, must know if XP64 or XP32)... and if your old hard drive will not bolt, another hard drive to use.

DO NOT use the current (new) hard drive in any circumstance (unless of course, you are continuing to use it as a WIN7 box), as it contains the information to put the machine back to it's original factory package - something you will probably want, at least to restore it to pristine for resale purposes.

And finally, I would encourage you to move forward with Win7 as XP is now a legacy system - Even if you can shoehorn it into the present box, the next box you get will almost certainly not be able to use XP, and you may well be on an even steeper learning curve with Windows 8 (or 9, 10, etc) than you already have with Win7. Time waits for no man.

Try moving your mail to Mozilla Thunderbird, which will be more likely to remain relatively unchanged between windows iterations, and even between operating system platforms (works in Linux too). In any case, it is not a good idea to stay in Outlook Express (which you probably used in XP), as it has known exploits, and is not able to defend against some viruses.

If you used Outlook rather than Outlook Express, then all this is for naught, as all you need to do is install Office and move your .pst file from the old to the new, and you will be right where you were, but on the new machine and in Win7 :)

48 posted on 06/13/2012 8:40:12 AM PDT by roamer_1 (Globalism is just socialism in a business suit.)
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To: saminfl

My work just gave me a new computer w/ Win 7 Pro.
Hate it. Esp Office Outlook.

Yesterday I logged off the network back to my C drive. Black screen w/ icons.
My pretty desktop gone. Down in the tray was a notification..
‘The Windows you are running is not genuine’. Huh ??
Rebooted. A panel appears ‘ The Copy of Windows is counterfeit.”
That is baloney ! Took the IT guy about an hour to get it going.
Long for XP.
But then I come home, fire up the Mac and all is well.


49 posted on 06/13/2012 8:44:58 AM PDT by Vinnie (A)
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To: saminfl
No, you cannot. The WinXP must be installed on the PC so that drivers for your particular devices can be loaded and installed.

If the XP on the drive you want to use was installed on a different PC then your devices will not work properly. Even if it did, you would have an issue with XP wanting to re-activate because all you hardware has changed.

You would be better off running XP in a virtual machine from within Win7. I believe Win7 has Microsoft Virtual PC already on it. Just make a VM and install your WinXP on it. You may have to re-activate. That's a much slicker solution.

50 posted on 06/13/2012 8:55:19 AM PDT by Bloody Sam Roberts (My dog, yes. My wife, maybe. My gun....NEVER!)
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