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Carnivores - git yur knives, forks, and freezers ready!!

Posted on 07/09/2012 5:38:51 PM PDT by djf

I've seen two reports today that talked about the weather over the midwest and the corn.

The corn crop just about nationwide is a dismal failure due to droughts and prices are expected to climb by at least fifty percent.

For many products that use corn, that means BUY IT NOW!

Sadly, there is another outcome, farmers were interviewed and for them it means one thing - they can't feed their stock, so they end up going to the slaughterhouse.

So soon, there will be a glut of meat on the market, expect prices to plummet (before they rise almost exponentially), but it would be a good idea for anybody who enjoys a steak or roast to keep their eyes open and their freezer ready for bargains.


TOPICS: Agriculture; Food; Weather
KEYWORDS: agriculture; anwr; energy; ethanol; futures; keystonexl; mtba; ntsa; opec; speculation; stfu

1 posted on 07/09/2012 5:38:56 PM PDT by djf
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To: djf
Here in SW Pa. I see one corn field planted ... and it is pitifully short of the "knee high by th' fourth o' July"

Farmers just didn't plant.

2 posted on 07/09/2012 5:41:52 PM PDT by knarf (I say things that are true ... I have no proof ... but they're true)
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To: djf
Bargains? On meat? LOL

If anything, this might return prices to a level that is more reasonable.

3 posted on 07/09/2012 5:42:10 PM PDT by 1rudeboy
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To: AdmSmith; AnonymousConservative; Berosus; bigheadfred; Bockscar; ColdOne; Convert from ECUSA; ...

Thanks djf. Hey, I think I’m in before the “corn shortages are caused by ethanol” crap begins.

Record heat waves goodbye to area
The Washington Times | July 8, 2012 | Meredith Somers
Posted on 07/09/2012 5:37:05 PM PDT by Tolerance Sucks Rocks
http://www.freerepublic.com/focus/news/2904674/posts


4 posted on 07/09/2012 5:47:01 PM PDT by SunkenCiv (https://secure.freerepublic.com/donate/)
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To: djf
Here in Michigan I have seen a lot of fields of corn planted and it seems to be growing very well.
5 posted on 07/09/2012 5:56:19 PM PDT by Harmless Teddy Bear (Dragons don't have friends. The nearest they can get to the idea is an enemy who is still alive.)
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To: djf

Early warmth brought the Michigan fruit trees into bloom early but the blossoms froze and has devastated that crop. They’re saying 90% of the apple and tart cherry crops were wiped out with a 95% loss of the peach crop.

I know my apple trees don’t have a single apple but my pear trees are going to fall over from all the pears on them.


6 posted on 07/09/2012 6:01:56 PM PDT by cripplecreek (What does it profit a man if he gains the whole world but loses his soul?)
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To: Harmless Teddy Bear

Plenty of rain in Michigan, unfortunately none of it seems to be falling in my yard. Its a regular old drought for a radius of about 10 miles around my house.


7 posted on 07/09/2012 6:07:47 PM PDT by cripplecreek (What does it profit a man if he gains the whole world but loses his soul?)
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To: cripplecreek

Sounds like you’re in a rain shadow. Has it happened before?


8 posted on 07/09/2012 6:13:52 PM PDT by SatinDoll
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To: knarf

In my area of NC the rain has been so hit and miss that in some locations the corn is parched all to hell and 5 miles away it looks like a bumper crop.


9 posted on 07/09/2012 6:15:20 PM PDT by Rebelbase (The most transparent administration ever is clear as mud.)
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To: djf
I have been following this for a month. Updates to the map will be posted on Thursday. Here is the six week drought map in GIF format:



Here is a good site to monitor US drought conditions. What a perfect storm.
10 posted on 07/09/2012 6:16:28 PM PDT by PA Engineer (Time to beat the swords of government tyranny into the plowshares of freedom.)
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To: djf

Here in the Pacific Northwest we had a cold, wet June. Finally, on the 5th of July we began to see sunshine.

I don’t know how well this helps orchardists in Wahsington and Oregon, but cherries are now in the markets and look really delicious. Hopefully the wheat crops in eastern Washington and Oregon will have benefited from the rainy weather, too, and yield bountifully this fall.


11 posted on 07/09/2012 6:18:02 PM PDT by SatinDoll
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To: SatinDoll

Evey so often we’ll fall into a pattern were the rain fades as it gets here of forms just east of us. Its not really unusual just irritating because I like rain. We need the rain to come from a more southwesterly direction for us to get it good.

Its been drier than dust and they’ve had long rain delays at Comerica park 70 miles away.


12 posted on 07/09/2012 6:21:31 PM PDT by cripplecreek (What does it profit a man if he gains the whole world but loses his soul?)
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To: SatinDoll

Weather this year is vastly improved over last year.

Many, many days, even in the summer last year, temps were in the 50’s and it rained.

All of my garden is doing hugely better. I picked a boatload of pea pods this morning.


13 posted on 07/09/2012 6:26:00 PM PDT by djf ("There are more old drunkards than old doctors." - Benjamin Franklin)
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To: djf

Interesting beef market hypothesis but you’re a year too late as ranchers sold off herds last year during that drought and haven’t had time to restock to a level for another sell-off.


14 posted on 07/09/2012 6:30:31 PM PDT by T-Bird45 (It feels like the seventies, and it shouldn't.)
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To: SatinDoll
I don’t know how well this helps orchardists in Wahsington and Oregon, but cherries are now in the markets and look really delicious.

That's why its good to have cops spread all over rather than growing them all in one area. We have no cherries in Michigan this year but it sounds like west coast cherries are doing well. I'm assuming the apples out that way are doing OK as well.
15 posted on 07/09/2012 6:32:52 PM PDT by cripplecreek (What does it profit a man if he gains the whole world but loses his soul?)
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To: djf

Big part of Mn they are talking about record yields.


16 posted on 07/09/2012 6:33:29 PM PDT by DManA
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To: cripplecreek; SatinDoll

We’re having the same problem. The storm clouds gather, it gets black as night outside, and they rain themselves out before they get here, or they pass north or south of us.

It’s frustrating, and some of our trees are turning brown and dropping their leaves from the heat and lack of rain. Forget the lawn. What’s wrong with the lawn? It’s dead.


17 posted on 07/09/2012 6:35:45 PM PDT by TheOldLady
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To: PA Engineer
I'm sorry P A but this is just not true.

I travel extensively from Colorado to Ohio and North Dakota/Minnesota to Louisiana and work in the Ag industry.

There is still a drought in southern Kansas/south east Colorada and one getting started in Central Illinois and Indiana.

BUT, the corn crop in Arkansas, Nebraska, Iowa, South Dakota, and Louisiana is going great guns this year.

I am speaking from first hand observation.

18 posted on 07/09/2012 6:36:15 PM PDT by Just another Joe (Warning: FReeping can be addictive and helpful to your mental health)
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To: djf

Here in Kentucky our corn crop is taking a real hit. Ironically, it was the largest planting in 25 years. I hope we don’t lose a lot of farmers because of it.


19 posted on 07/09/2012 6:39:17 PM PDT by ChildOfThe60s (If you can remember the 60s....you weren't really there)
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To: djf

SW Va: haven’t had to mow for a month, hallelujah!
Hay may be going up for the farmers.

http://www.cpc.ncep.noaa.gov/products/predictions/long_range/seasonal.php?lead=1
NOAA predicts above average temps across the country through this summer, and average rainfall in most parts.


20 posted on 07/09/2012 7:09:30 PM PDT by mrsmith (Dumb sluts: Lifeblood of the Media, Backbone of the Democrat Party!)
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To: cripplecreek

I believe so.


21 posted on 07/09/2012 7:13:19 PM PDT by SatinDoll
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To: Just another Joe

Three weeks of sustained hot, dry weather across much of the United States has propelled the grain complex higher with corn leading the way.

After the markets closed, the Department of Agriculture reported that 40 percent of the U.S. corn crop was rated in good to excellent condition, a drop of 8 percentage points from the previous week and the biggest weekly decline in nine years.

Sizzling temperatures abated in the Corn Belt over the weekend, but rains this week were expected to miss the areas that need moisture most. Forecasts indicate that Iowa and Illinois, the two biggest U.S. corn and soybean producing states, should be mostly dry for the next 10 days...

http://www.reuters.com/article/2012/07/09/us-markets-grains-idUSBRE8681BN20120709


22 posted on 07/09/2012 7:13:19 PM PDT by free me (Roberts killed America)
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To: djf

If you do get a bargain on bulk beef, I highly recommend the following: vacuum pack, sous vide cook, ice water bath and freeze.

Home vacuum packing is very reasonable these days. If you buy beef in bulk, cheaper cuts taste better than steak cuts with sous vide cooking. And once cooked and frozen can last up to a year. Sous vide really holds on to the beefy flavor and odor.

To start with, here is a primer on how to cook sous vide meat.

http://www.seriouseats.com/2010/03/how-to-sous-vide-steak.html

Since most people aren’t going to shell out for a cooker to keep their water temperature at 135F for a couple of hours, it’s best just to use a candy thermometer and check your water every 5 minutes.

If you figure your stored meat is to last for more than six months, you might salt it or add a few drops of rosemary extract prior to sealing.

Cook - Chill - Freeze - Reheat

Season and vacuum several batches of food and cook them all together to save time. Beef, pork and lamb all cook at 135F.

When they’ve finished cooking, quick chill the pouches in an ice water bath (half ice/half water) for at least 30 to 45 minutes.

Label with contents and date and freeze for up to one year.
Reheat the cooked food from a thawed or chilled state at the sous vide temperature for 45 minutes per inch of thickness. If reheating from frozen, allow an additional 30 minutes.

Sear or sauce the food, as usual, if desired.

A personal favorite of mine is stew beef, a 5lb bulk tray split into 1lb vacuum bags. After cooking it still looks rare, but is very tender and flavorful, as well as being ready for many beef recipes.


23 posted on 07/09/2012 7:14:24 PM PDT by yefragetuwrabrumuy
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To: djf
Looking out my back door. Looks the same for about a 100 miles in all directions. Not saying it isn't bad in some areas. But it sure looks good here.


24 posted on 07/09/2012 7:22:36 PM PDT by SolidRedState (I used to think bizarro world was a fiction.)
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To: free me
I can tell you from first hand observation that much more than 40% of the corn crop is in, at least, good to excellent condition.

In the past 4 weeks I have been in Nebraska, South Dakota, Iowa, Kansas, Arkansas, Louisiana, and Missouri.

The only place I have seen less than good condition is in Southern Kansas and much has been in excellent condition.

I can't say anyhting, yet about Illinois, Indiana, or Ohio in the past 4 weeks except what I have heard in passing and that is that central Illinois and Indiana are hurting right now.

Believe me, I pay attention to grain and bean crops as I drive the roads. My job depends on them.

25 posted on 07/09/2012 7:33:42 PM PDT by Just another Joe (Warning: FReeping can be addictive and helpful to your mental health)
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To: SolidRedState

Oh my, you live in Eden!


26 posted on 07/09/2012 7:35:58 PM PDT by MHGinTN (Being deceived can be cured.)
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To: SolidRedState

Ever hear old baseball players whispering in your ear?


27 posted on 07/09/2012 7:37:04 PM PDT by cripplecreek (What does it profit a man if he gains the whole world but loses his soul?)
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To: SolidRedState

Lookin good!

I grew up in upstate NY (western), and even though NY isn’t widely known as a producer, there is one heck of a lot of field corn there.

To a young kid wandering the fields, 8, 9, or 10 foot corn plants is pretty darn impressive!


28 posted on 07/09/2012 7:40:45 PM PDT by djf ("There are more old drunkards than old doctors." - Benjamin Franklin)
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To: yefragetuwrabrumuy

Thanks! Might try that.

What I usually do is buy like roasts (or sometimes steaks). If it’s a roast or two, cut it into strips then wrap it in saran wrap getting ALL the air out.

That way I’m all set up for like stir fry or even take them out the night before and charBq em.

I’ve used meat frozen for 2 years or more and as long as the air didn’t get to it, it’s good. Toss a tsp of horseradish in there and nobodys gonna know the difference.


29 posted on 07/09/2012 7:47:22 PM PDT by djf ("There are more old drunkards than old doctors." - Benjamin Franklin)
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To: cripplecreek

My house too. Rain looks like it is going to arrive and at the last minute it either breaks north or south.


30 posted on 07/09/2012 8:02:20 PM PDT by Harmless Teddy Bear (Dragons don't have friends. The nearest they can get to the idea is an enemy who is still alive.)
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To: djf

We’ve been running cows on this ranch for over 100 years, hundreds of thousands have grazed this land during that time and not once have we ever fed corn, nor have any of the other ranches in the area. The only corn these cows ever get is when they knock over my damn deer feeders. Anybody that has to feed daily wasn’t going to stay in business long anyway. We run the feed truck once a week with rangecubes not because they need it but because thats the best way for us to gather them and take count. Last year here in West Texas was the worst I’ve seen in 60 years so we gatherd the boys and went on a prickly pear burning mission. Not only did we save the cows but we cleared allot of cactus out at the same time.


31 posted on 07/10/2012 4:45:16 AM PDT by Dusty Road
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To: djf

I highly recommend cooking beef the sous vide style. I got a 5 lb rack of stew beef, vacuum packed and cooked it that way, with just a couple of tsp of chopped garlic added. I brought the water up to temperature with a candy thermometer and watched it at five minute intervals to keep it right around 135F for an hour and a half.

When I opened the package I got this huge “beef!” smell, and for the next several days I cooked boeuf Bourguignon, beef Stroganoff, and Hungarian goulash, and all of them were much tastier than usual. Typically, I would fry the stew beef then pressure cook it for tenderness, but this was much better.

As one of those websites mentioned, a lot of restaurants are doing this today, so their meat is good to go and just needs searing before serving, and comes out just right every time.

For long term storage I mentioned adding salt or rosemary extract because both are very effective antibacterials, and rosemary also acts as a preservative, about as good as BHA and BHT, while giving a pleasant herb flavor to the beef. It has long been used specifically for that purpose.

Rosemary extract contains an enormous number of medicinal chemicals and has long been used to preserve beef (though it is toxic to dogs.)


32 posted on 07/10/2012 7:59:57 AM PDT by yefragetuwrabrumuy
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To: MHGinTN; djf; cripplecreek

yes, yes and yes.

:)


33 posted on 07/10/2012 9:10:09 AM PDT by SolidRedState (I used to think bizarro world was a fiction.)
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To: SolidRedState
Wow, looks exactly like the corn fields in that Mel Gibson movie "Signs."
34 posted on 07/10/2012 9:13:32 AM PDT by DTogo (High time to bring back the Sons of Liberty !!)
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To: DTogo
Wow, looks exactly like the corn fields in that Mel Gibson movie "Signs."

Last year, just prior to harvest, I was tending to the remnants of a brush fire to make sure no faggots went flying where they shouldn't.

I heard a loud crash and then steps coming through the corn toward me. I thought of that movie. LOL

I think it was just our resident white tail buck we nicknamed Bullwinkle because of his size and huge rack. He must have stumbled crossing through the corn field. But you can bet I kept one eye on the fire and one on the field.

35 posted on 07/10/2012 9:22:44 AM PDT by SolidRedState (I used to think bizarro world was a fiction.)
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To: SolidRedState

Around here, you usually see the does way before you see the buck. They kinda hang out in the background under cover and keep an eye on things. (and a nose!)

Had two doe munching on my green bean plants late night last fall. The buck was back in the woods, and he made this weird coughing noise. Man, they took off like they was struck by lightning or something!


36 posted on 07/10/2012 5:13:07 PM PDT by djf ("There are more old drunkards than old doctors." - Benjamin Franklin)
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To: djf

Bump!

In spite of what some folks say on this thread, I am still hearing predictions of falling meat prices. Except probably not chicken, which is expected to rise, time from hatching to market for chicken is under 50 days, so they will immediately be affected by rising grain prices.


37 posted on 07/20/2012 3:44:14 PM PDT by djf ("There are more old drunkards than old doctors." - Benjamin Franklin)
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