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Canning Question Vanity

Posted on 07/15/2012 3:03:11 PM PDT by goodwithagun

Are home canned potatoes tasty? I can't stand store bought canned potatoes, but I have a good crop this year and little freezer space. Thanks!


TOPICS: Agriculture; Chit/Chat; Food; Gardening
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Also, do they whip up nicely?
1 posted on 07/15/2012 3:03:20 PM PDT by goodwithagun
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To: goodwithagun

The traditional way of storing potatoes doesn’t involve canning or freezing —

*don’t wash the dirt off after you dig them up
*store in a cool, dark, space (if you don’t have a cellar, an inside closet should do)
*store in layers in wooden crates or baskets, with newspaper between each layer

This method should keep your potatoes most of the way through the winter, and the bottom layers should be suitable for seed for next season...

HTH


2 posted on 07/15/2012 3:10:45 PM PDT by Uncle Ike (Rope is cheap, and there are lots of trees...)
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To: Uncle Ike

Thanks!


3 posted on 07/15/2012 3:14:42 PM PDT by goodwithagun (My gun has killed fewer people than Ted Kennedy's car.)
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To: goodwithagun

i love canned potatoes!


4 posted on 07/15/2012 3:15:09 PM PDT by Mr. K (OBAMA MUST BE STOPPED ROMNEY/GINGRICH)
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To: goodwithagun
Back in the day folks would build a drawer system under and behind the cellar steps. Make sure the drawers are slated for air to get through and don't let the spuds touch each other. Single layers.
5 posted on 07/15/2012 3:28:28 PM PDT by 4yearlurker (No matter who you elect,the government eventually gets in.)
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To: goodwithagun

If you are canning spuds to prevent a scenario where starvation is a distinct possibility why worry about taste or whipability?

And it probably depends on the spud variety as to how well they can.

You do know you should kill the vines 7-14 days before you dig them?


6 posted on 07/15/2012 3:29:35 PM PDT by bigheadfred (MY PET TAPEWORM OBIWAN IS AN INSANE MILITARY HATING LEFTIST)
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To: goodwithagun

We canned a bunch once, and they were great! For gosh sakes, don’t freeze them!


7 posted on 07/15/2012 3:39:46 PM PDT by Cyber Liberty (Obama considers the Third World morally superior to the United States.)
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To: goodwithagun

Take this from someone who has zero experience canning but has seen grandma and mom do it thousands of times.

Try canning diced up potatoes with garlic cloves or some herb sprigs.

Or,

Dehydrate and store dry in sealed cans.


8 posted on 07/15/2012 3:46:45 PM PDT by mnehring
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To: Uncle Ike

Do you know if that works in areas of high humidity? I live in South Carolina, 60-80% humidity is common, and I would like to be able to store potatoes.


9 posted on 07/15/2012 3:49:36 PM PDT by Former Fetus (Saved by grace through faith)
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To: Former Fetus

” Do you know if that works in areas of high humidity? “

As far as I know (and someone more knowledgable can certainly correct me), humidity isn’t as much a factor as light and heat - one article I read about the subject (I’m growing potatoes for the first time, myself, so I did some reading up) indicated that leaving the layer of dirt on ‘em helped to protect them from humidity...

YMMV... ;)


10 posted on 07/15/2012 3:55:56 PM PDT by Uncle Ike (Rope is cheap, and there are lots of trees...)
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To: goodwithagun

My wife and I started canning a year ago; beef, chicken, pork,fish and some vegetables but haven’t tried potatoes yet. My mom used to can the smaller potatoes whole and they were good. My suggestion would be to can a few pints of diced and whole ones. Let them set for a few days then try them and decide which you like best. Even if you couldn’t use them for mashed potatoes you could use them in soups etc and use the dry stored ones for the other purposes. Since they will be cooked you want to make sure to add them to the soup late in the cooking process.


11 posted on 07/15/2012 4:04:15 PM PDT by Ab Alius Domitor ("In the end; the winner")
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To: goodwithagun

I don’t know about how well they would whip up—they might be lumpy—but I will put a word of caution out there.

I presume you know this already, but just in case—any time you can potatoes or any other low-acid food, make sure you cook them at boiling temperature for 20 minutes before eating them. You can’t see or smell botulinum toxin, but that cooking step should destroy it if it’s there. Also, low-acid foods should be pressure-canned.

Anyway, good luck.


12 posted on 07/15/2012 4:12:29 PM PDT by exDemMom (Now that I've finally accepted that I'm living a bad hair life, I'm more at peace with the world.)
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To: goodwithagun

Dry your spuds. Don’t can them.


13 posted on 07/15/2012 4:17:51 PM PDT by Jacquerie (I want my America back.)
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To: mnehring

Wouldn’t adding garlic to the spuds cause botulism?


14 posted on 07/15/2012 4:43:48 PM PDT by Copenhagen Smile (Ask me no questions, I"ll tell you no lies)
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To: goodwithagun

We canned a bunch once, and they were great! For gosh sakes, don’t freeze them!


15 posted on 07/15/2012 4:47:06 PM PDT by Cyber Liberty (Obama considers the Third World morally superior to the United States.)
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To: Uncle Ike

A little bit off the subject but sorta in line with the thought. Can anyone reccommend the best food saver on the market. (in low to medium price range)


16 posted on 07/15/2012 4:50:13 PM PDT by depenzz (A)
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To: Jacquerie
Dry your spuds. Don’t can them.

With the availability of potato chips and ketchup, why go to all the trouble of canning them?

17 posted on 07/15/2012 4:52:25 PM PDT by aimhigh
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To: exDemMom

I thought 10” of boiling killed botulism?.....


18 posted on 07/15/2012 4:56:22 PM PDT by cherry (/)
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To: goodwithagun

I would freeze some for french fries and hash browns. Dehydrate some for casseroles. Finally leave the rest whole in cool storage for fresh potatoes. If the fresh ones start going soft, dehydrate the remaining ones.


19 posted on 07/15/2012 5:03:30 PM PDT by Kirkwood (Zombie Hunter)
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To: goodwithagun

White potatoes are definitely supposed to be pressure canned, if you should decide to can them.

http://nchfp.uga.edu/how/can_04/potato_white.html


20 posted on 07/15/2012 5:31:04 PM PDT by Will88
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To: goodwithagun; cherry; Copenhagen Smile

Pressure can the potatoes - boiling at 212F will not safely preserve the spuds from botulism potential because these are low acid vegetables.

Ask questions here: http://www.freshpreserving.com/tools/faqs.aspx


21 posted on 07/15/2012 5:35:30 PM PDT by WorkingClassFilth (I'm for Churchill in 1940!)
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To: goodwithagun
Yes potatoes can nicely. Use a pressure canner not a water bath.

I have never whipped them but I see no reason why they shouldn't.

22 posted on 07/15/2012 5:44:54 PM PDT by Harmless Teddy Bear (Dragons don't have friends. The nearest they can get to the idea is an enemy who is still alive.)
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To: Former Fetus

White and sweet potatoes can keep beautifully in a basement. I have read that you should keep all produce in the basement far away from apples.


23 posted on 07/15/2012 6:05:28 PM PDT by Mamzelle
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To: goodwithagun

I have heard the burying them with a layer of straw between them will help preserve them also.


24 posted on 07/15/2012 6:39:37 PM PDT by phockthis (http://www.supremelaw.org/fedzone11/index.htm ...)
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To: cherry

I thought that, too, but I looked it up right before posting. It could be that the website I looked at recommended 20 minutes to allow for the interior of the food to reach boiling temperature.


25 posted on 07/15/2012 6:43:34 PM PDT by exDemMom (Now that I've finally accepted that I'm living a bad hair life, I'm more at peace with the world.)
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To: goodwithagun

My suggestion: Go to the grocery store and buy a bag of potatoes when you need them. I just bought a ten-pound bag for two dollars and they taste great.

Why take unnecessary risks (bacteria) and hours of time, plus heating the house up, with canning? I can’t believe anyone can save money doing it yourself when you can buy a can of fruit or vegetables for under one dollar at most grocery stores.


26 posted on 07/16/2012 5:10:39 AM PDT by dupree
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To: dupree

Well the tater sets were free; I traded with a neighbor. The seeds I traded to her were free for me because I raise all heirloom plants. Each free tater plant will yield between three and five pounds of spuds. Right now I’m at an average of 50 pounds for nothing but the time for me to plant and hill them. This I do while my kids are playing on their nearby jungle gym. Even if I do can them I will wait for a cool day, and I get all my lids on clearance. The jars and rings I use again and again. At this rate if I can them, which I’m leaning against doing, I will be out 75 cents for every 12 quarts. That’s not 75 cents each quart, but 75 cents for every dozen quarts. This is for pesticide free spuds. My mom learned to can from her mom, and I from my mom. I have literally never had an issue with the quality I’ve canned, and neither have mom or grandma. Then when you add the fact that my children are learning from where food really comes, the whole experience becomes invaluable. Even if I would save money at the sore, which I won’t in the case of my garden and home canned produce, my children will not be obama zombies if hard times really do hit.


27 posted on 07/16/2012 4:47:15 PM PDT by goodwithagun (My gun has killed fewer people than Ted Kennedy's car.)
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