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Digia Buys Out Qt From Nokia ( Implications for Android and Linux?)
Phoronix ^ | August 09, 2012 | Michael Larabel

Posted on 08/09/2012 10:23:35 AM PDT by Ernest_at_the_Beach

Digia has bought out Qt from Nokia. Uh oh?

Nokia has announced today that Digia is acquiring the Qt software technologies and Qt business from Nokia. Digia is completely taking over Qt. Digia is the open-core company that previously took over Qt Commercial and releases their special version of Qt to customers. Digia claims they will take care of the commercial and open-source versions of the new Qt and they also want to bring the popular tool-kit to Android, Apple iOS, and Windows 8.

With the Qt acquisition, a maximum of 125 people from Nokia will be joining Digia. Most of these people are from the Berlin and Oslo offices. This news comes just days after Nokia shut down their Qt Australia office, which already has made a negative impact on Qt 5.0. Lars Knoll of Qt said it was really sad to see this happen.

Around the same time is when I reported Nokia was looking to sell off Qt based upon comments made and my sources in Germany. It looks like that ended up being spot-on except for the fact this announcement was made prior to the Qt 5.0 release rather than afterwards. However, Digia says they'll be looking to ship Qt 5.0 as soon as possible.

Is Digia's acquisition of Qt from Nokia good or bad? Only time will tell. Obviously not everyone is happy with Digia's business model and their past Qt Commercial releases carrying large patch deltas against the open-source version. The focus on mobile platforms for Qt may also shift some of the paid development time away from the desktop version. For some Phoronix readers, they may be excited about Qt on iOS and Android, especially as that then presents some more competition for Mono. Meanwhile, other Phoronix readers are likely counting the days until Qt is forked. It will be interesting to see how a Digia-controlled Qt pans out in the coming months.

For more information on this acquisition, see today's press release and the Qt Commercial blog post.


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TOPICS: Business/Economy; Computers/Internet
KEYWORDS: android; hitech; linux

1 posted on 08/09/2012 10:23:40 AM PDT by Ernest_at_the_Beach
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To: rdb3; Calvinist_Dark_Lord; Salo; JosephW; Only1choice____Freedom; amigatec; stylin_geek; ...

2 posted on 08/09/2012 10:26:43 AM PDT by ShadowAce (Linux -- The Ultimate Windows Service Pack)
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To: rdb3; Calvinist_Dark_Lord; Salo; JosephW; Only1choice____Freedom; amigatec; stylin_geek; ...

3 posted on 08/09/2012 10:27:24 AM PDT by ShadowAce (Linux -- The Ultimate Windows Service Pack)
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To: ShadowAce
Also:

Qt Developers Work Out Plans For Time-Based Releases

*********************************

Posted by Michael Larabel on August 06, 2012

Following the Qt 5.0 release, developers of this open-source tool-kit will aim to issue feature updates on a six-month cycle.

Joao Abecasis reignited the discussion today concerning setting up time-based releases for Qt. "While releasing Qt 5.0.0 is an ongoing process, I think this is a good time to start planning future releases (5.0.1, 5.1.0, etc.) and, most importantly, we need to discuss *how* we'll get them out on time. With the setup we now have we should quickly move to a strict time-based release schedule. A predictable schedule allows all interested to align with the project and contribute to make the next release the traditional Best Release Ever (tm) of Qt."

The time-based release plan, which has been talked about in months past and reaffirmed today by the developers that responded thus far, would be to issue new minor releases (Qt 5.1, Qt 5.2, etc) on a six-month basis while new patch releases (Qt 5.0.1, Qt 5.0.2, etc) would happen about every two months. Each minor version would get three patch releases (5.x.0, 5.x.1, and 5.x.2) before maintenance is then dropped. Downstream distributors would be left to maintaining their own longer-term support versions of a Qt release stream should they choose.

This development would be coordinated via the use of three Git branches: fire-hose, leaky-faucet, and dripping-bucket, which would roughly coordinate to alpha, beta, and release candidate branches. All of the main development would go into Qt's "fire-hose" code-base (effectively their "Git master") while leaky-faucet would go for the patch release cycle with bug fixes for regressions and maintaining binary compatibility, and then dripping-bucket would only handle release critical bug-fixes.

The Qt time-based release plans are discussed in more detail via the project's development mailing list. Meanwhile, there's nothing new at the moment about Nokia's plans to sell Qt with the sad things they are doing and the impact is already harming the Qt 5.0 release.

Qt 5.0 is expected to go into beta very soon but the official release date prior to moving into this time-based release schedule has yet to be firmly decided.

4 posted on 08/09/2012 10:31:47 AM PDT by Ernest_at_the_Beach (The Global Warming Hoax was a Criminal Act....where is Al Gore?)
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