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Can You Pass the Basic Preparedness Test?
Activist Post ^ | 8/25/12 | Gaye Levy

Posted on 08/25/2012 4:56:33 PM PDT by Kartographer

Periodically, I like to perform what I call a “walk around” inventory. In the simplest of terms, what that means is that I walk around my home, garage and yard with an eye peeled to deficiencies that need to be corrected to insure my safety in the event of a natural disaster.

Here where I live, that primarily means an earthquake or winter storm but in fact, it could mean anything that disrupts a normal way of life.

In addition to my walkaround inventory, I go over my preparedness checklist so that I can re-familiarize myself with the things that need to be in place at all times – things that I may have allowed to go slack for one reason or another.

With hurricane season upon us, I thought it would be a good idea to uncork the preparedness test as a reminder that even though a it has been almost seven years since the last major hurricane in North America, we still need to be aware of the supplies and skills we need to have at hand to stay safe.

(Excerpt) Read more at activistpost.com ...


TOPICS: Miscellaneous
KEYWORDS: preparedness; preppers; prepperstest; survival
I encourage you to test yourselves. Take yourself off grid for a week either to your bug out location or bug in. Make it as real as you can. See where your holes are. Better now than latter.
1 posted on 08/25/2012 4:56:41 PM PDT by Kartographer
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To: appalachian_dweller; OldPossum; DuncanWaring; VirginiaMom; CodeToad; goosie; kalee; ...

Preppers’ PING!!


2 posted on 08/25/2012 4:58:24 PM PDT by Kartographer ("We mutually pledge to each other our lives, our fortunes and our sacred honor.")
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To: Kartographer
"Take yourself off grid for a week either to your bug out location or bug in. Make it as real as you can. See where your holes are. Better now than latter."

Been there done that. At the beginning of July our town was shutdown by a storm for almost a week.

No electricity, Water was unusable (the Water Works couldn't run properly due to the power outage.)No gas stations worked. Stores were closed. We managed fine with our stores of food and water and used my "water still" to get us drinkable water and we had enough stored water to wash with. We didn't activate our rain storage system but we were getting close.

3 posted on 08/25/2012 5:05:58 PM PDT by Mad Dawgg (If you're going to deny my 1st Amendment rights then I must proceed to the 2nd one...)
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To: Kartographer
Still actually living the life. 3rd month on stored rations and forage. It does look like the personal financial disaster will be over early next month, though, Praise God.

And the large outdoor woodburning adobe oven is coming along nicely. I have spent exactly $0 on it so far. All materials are off the property, plus my labor.

I can't wait for the first loaves of bread out of it.

/johnny

4 posted on 08/25/2012 5:08:14 PM PDT by JRandomFreeper (Gone Galt)
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To: Mad Dawgg

What state are you in?


5 posted on 08/25/2012 5:16:36 PM PDT by mkmensinger
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To: Kartographer

I’m in better shape than most people, but I fall short in this test.

Sigh, back to work.

But, I think this test is missing something vital. Security. Can you protect your family if law enforcement is unavailable for 72 hours or more? If you have any weapons, are you properly trained in their use? Do you periodically use them to maintain your proficiency?

I was living in Central Florida when Andrew hit. The news reports of Dade County afterwards were ugly. A few smart people saved themselves a lot of grief by sitting on their front porches holding shotguns.


6 posted on 08/25/2012 5:19:08 PM PDT by ChildOfThe60s (If you can remember the 60s....you weren't really there)
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To: JRandomFreeper
I did such an inventory test this past week and couldn't believe it. I still had 56 food items I need to get and 10 nonfood items. Rats.

I did purchase a portable oven that uses the 1 lb. propane bottles but can be hooked to a large one. I can bake bread or anything with that. I guess compare that to your adobe oven. I spent $120 and you spent nothing.

I can't compare myself with you as you are the master.

7 posted on 08/25/2012 5:25:19 PM PDT by Marcella (Conservatism is dead. PREPARE)
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To: Kartographer
It's stock up for winter here in NYS. My parents did it way back in the 40's and they learned it from their parents.

Keep the car filled up, too. We're near a nuclear power plant.

8 posted on 08/25/2012 5:25:25 PM PDT by Sacajaweau
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9 posted on 08/25/2012 5:28:51 PM PDT by onyx (FREE REPUBLIC IS HERE TO STAY! DONATE MONTHLY! IF YOU WANT ON SARAH PALIN''S PING LIST, LET ME KNOW)
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To: Marcella
LOL! I'm just broke right now. Poverty is the true mother of invention.

Besides, building the oven gives me something to do while I wait.

I expect I'll be selling some bread from it in the future. It's big enough to do a dozen loaves without crowding.

Probably cook 6 pizzas at one time.

/johnny

10 posted on 08/25/2012 5:32:00 PM PDT by JRandomFreeper (Gone Galt)
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To: mkmensinger
"What state are you in?"

The 51st...

11 posted on 08/25/2012 5:58:19 PM PDT by Mad Dawgg (If you're going to deny my 1st Amendment rights then I must proceed to the 2nd one...)
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To: Mad Dawgg

I asked because I met a Mad Dawg (one g) in NJ and we did have such a storm recently.


12 posted on 08/25/2012 6:02:07 PM PDT by mkmensinger
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To: JRandomFreeper

If we would all learn how to make really good bread; that would go a long way on our food list. Simplify. Simplify. Simplify. - I’m sort of tired of those we get at the supermarket, even the whole grain ones. - My homemade yeast bread has always turned out like a brick; but I make cornbread, whole grain pancakes and sometimes biskits.


13 posted on 08/25/2012 6:02:32 PM PDT by Twinkie (John 3:16)
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To: Twinkie
I do have the advantage of culinary school background.

It takes a mentor that is good to really teach you how to make bread. I can teach the basics in a 10-12 hour session.

I make all of my own bread; loaf bread for sammiches, baguettes, bread sticks, cinnamon rolls, all of it. I haven't bought bread in years.

/johnny

14 posted on 08/25/2012 6:07:58 PM PDT by JRandomFreeper (Gone Galt)
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To: Mad Dawgg

I tried going without electricity and it sucks. The AC doesn’t work. Satellite TV? fuhgettaboutit. However,like you, I have my back-up “water still” and can make creek water into potable water if needed. It makes the hobby more palatable to the missus.


15 posted on 08/25/2012 6:20:45 PM PDT by BipolarBob (Biden: "HOPE and CHAINS for all 57 states".)
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To: BipolarBob
Your local school zone flashing lights don't have the solar panels on the pole above them?

Foraging, not just for nettle soup. ;)

/johnny

16 posted on 08/25/2012 6:33:44 PM PDT by JRandomFreeper (Gone Galt)
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To: JRandomFreeper

Now that’s a good idea.


17 posted on 08/25/2012 6:41:37 PM PDT by BipolarBob (Biden: "HOPE and CHAINS for all 57 states".)
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To: Twinkie

“My homemade yeast bread has always turned out like a brick;”

Don’t tell Johnny, but I cheat. I have a big bucket (like the Amish use) with a manual handle and you turn the handle for 3-5 miinutes and the bread is kneaded. Then, leave it in there to rise. See, I couldn’t knead worth a darn, so I got the Amish dough bucket. There are manual kneading machines now, but they are modern looking.

Johnny is an expert with anything food, but I have to cheat.


18 posted on 08/25/2012 6:46:47 PM PDT by Marcella (Conservatism is dead. PREPARE)
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To: Marcella
Heck, I use a commercial KitchenAid(tm) mixer with a dough hook (8 minutes for my standard loaf). I'm not kneading that stuff by hand. That's why generators were invented.

/johnny

19 posted on 08/25/2012 6:52:15 PM PDT by JRandomFreeper (Gone Galt)
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To: JRandomFreeper

If I ever break out of my reclusiveness again, my next companion will be better at making bread than I am. Bread has a spiritual quality to it when it is made right and just out of the oven. My first wife grew up walking past a local bakery every day from school. She was given a nickle by her mother, to buy a personal loaf of fressh baked bread, which she would eat on the walk home. ... What a woman! She was one heck of a cook, too.


20 posted on 08/25/2012 7:15:17 PM PDT by MHGinTN (Being deceived can be cured.)
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As an aside, our son from thet first marriage makes the best biscuits you will ever wrap your motuh around! He has the kneading technique down to a science ... he’s very science oriented.


21 posted on 08/25/2012 7:17:46 PM PDT by MHGinTN (Being deceived can be cured.)
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To: Kartographer

Wow, we scored about a 66% on that one.

In fairness, we don’t have a gas-fired house, so some of the questions came out N/A. But we were slacking in some places...


22 posted on 08/25/2012 7:18:43 PM PDT by Old Sarge (We are now officially over the precipice, we just havent struck the ground yet)
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To: Marcella

Thank you. - I’m 66 yrs. old; and seem to be getting weaker as we speak. Come to think of it, though, even in my twenties and thirties I couldn’t knead bread worth a flip. The loaves they have at the bakery depts. in the supermarkets that are supposed to be “homemade” have so many additives in them that it’s scary.


23 posted on 08/25/2012 7:35:25 PM PDT by Twinkie (John 3:16)
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To: ChildOfThe60s

>A few smart people saved themselves a lot of grief by sitting on their front porches holding shotguns.

I have some friends who were there for that. Luckily their family has a class 3 weapons permit and a couple Mac-10s because they used to said to the Bahamas and Pirates of the Caribbean isn’t just a Disney ride. They stood watch with those and had no troubles.


24 posted on 08/25/2012 7:38:03 PM PDT by drbuzzard (All animals are created equal, but some are more equal than others.)
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To: Marcella

Thank you. - I’m 66 yrs. old; and seem to be getting weaker as we speak. Come to think of it, though, even in my twenties and thirties I couldn’t knead bread worth a flip. The loaves they have at the bakery depts. in the supermarkets that are supposed to be “homemade” have so many additives in them that it’s scary.


25 posted on 08/25/2012 7:41:16 PM PDT by Twinkie (John 3:16)
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To: Twinkie

“I’m 66 yrs. old; and seem to be getting weaker as we speak.”

You are a youngster - I am 78. I have to do things differently, use gadgets to perform tasks my hands are not strong enough to do anymore.


26 posted on 08/25/2012 8:24:06 PM PDT by Marcella (Conservatism is dead. PREPARE)
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To: Kartographer
I have a hurricane advancing on my neighborhood and I look around and discover that I don't need ANYTHING.

Pick up the loose stuff in the yard and (Maybe) put up the shutters...done/ready!

27 posted on 08/25/2012 9:39:35 PM PDT by blam
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To: Kartographer

Good Stuff Kart! We had a snow storm a few years ago that shut the entire city down for a week. We did good but one thing I didn’t prepare for was that with no electricity we had to eat every thing in the freezer. Some still spoiled.


28 posted on 08/25/2012 10:04:11 PM PDT by djone
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To: blam

We live in a flood area. The neighbors never understand how I know when to start hauling stuff up from the river to higher ground. Funny, I never understand why they can’t look up at the sky for dark clouds. It took years for me to finally figure out if stuff wasn’t down there, stuff didn’t need to be brought up, duh.

I passed the test with about 75%. Failed simple things like the radio and shoes. Have the radio but I don’t think the solar battery recharger takes 9 volt batteries.


29 posted on 08/26/2012 7:50:28 AM PDT by bgill
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To: djone

The more freezers are packed, the longer they stay cold. If you have a few hours before big storm hits, pack in containers with water so they’ll freeze in case the electricity goes off. Also, pull out a big roast or two and cook them up so at least those are ready to eat. If it’s a snow storm - there’s your ready made refrigeration. First day with no electricity is ice cream day! After that is meat because that’s more expensive than vegetables.


30 posted on 08/26/2012 7:57:46 AM PDT by bgill
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To: Twinkie; Marcella; MHGinTN
Can't make bread? Make tortillas! Super simple, versatile, doesn't require yeast or kneading and only takes a minute or so of heat to cook compared to baking a loaf for 45 minutes of controlled heat.
31 posted on 08/26/2012 8:44:03 AM PDT by bgill
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To: bgill; Twinkie; Marcella; MHGinTN

Navajo Fry Bread History - Indian Tacos History

http://whatscookingamerica.net/History/NavajoFryBread.htm


32 posted on 08/26/2012 9:24:41 AM PDT by Kartographer ("We mutually pledge to each other our lives, our fortunes and our sacred honor.")
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To: bgill

I make scones and biscuits. My specialty is cheese biscuits with tabasco sauce and sharp cheddar ... Alabama Hot Cheese pones.


33 posted on 08/26/2012 9:24:41 AM PDT by MHGinTN (Being deceived can be cured.)
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To: Kartographer; bgill

I have many recipes to make bread on the stove top and a number of those are American Indian recipes and old frontier recipes. I also have a heavy real torilla press (where did I put that?).

Because I have a Family Grain Mill and the hand bucket bread kneader, I decided to add a portable oven to bake bread and cakes/cookies/casseroles. I have long term storage Walton flour but no actual wheat. I’ll fix that and get long life wheat from Walton and that’s good for 30-35 years; flour doesn’t last nearly that long. That’s another back up to be sure I don’t run out of life saving food.

I’m a three ways to do something prepper and sometimes four ways. I’ve been doing this since 1998 and keep upgrading equipment as better products have become available.

Prepping is never finished.


34 posted on 08/26/2012 10:09:49 AM PDT by Marcella (Conservatism is dead. PREPARE)
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To: Kartographer; bgill

I have many recipes to make bread on the stove top and a number of those are American Indian recipes and old frontier recipes. I also have a heavy real torilla press (where did I put that?).

Because I have a Family Grain Mill and the hand bucket bread kneader, I decided to add a portable oven to bake bread and cakes/cookies/casseroles. I have long term storage Walton flour but no actual wheat. I’ll fix that and get long life wheat from Walton and that’s good for 30-35 years; flour doesn’t last nearly that long. That’s another back up to be sure I don’t run out of life saving food.

I’m a three ways to do something prepper and sometimes four ways. I’ve been doing this since 1998 and keep upgrading equipment as better products have become available.

Prepping is never finished.


35 posted on 08/26/2012 10:10:05 AM PDT by Marcella (Conservatism is dead. PREPARE)
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To: Kartographer; bgill

I have many recipes to make bread on the stove top and a number of those are American Indian recipes and old frontier recipes. I also have a heavy real torilla press (where did I put that?).

Because I have a Family Grain Mill and the hand bucket bread kneader, I decided to add a portable oven to bake bread and cakes/cookies/casseroles. I have long term storage Walton flour but no actual wheat. I’ll fix that and get long life wheat from Walton and that’s good for 30-35 years; flour doesn’t last nearly that long. That’s another back up to be sure I don’t run out of life saving food.

I’m a three ways to do something prepper and sometimes four ways. I’ve been doing this since 1998 and keep upgrading equipment as better products have become available.

Prepping is never finished.


36 posted on 08/26/2012 10:12:00 AM PDT by Marcella (Conservatism is dead. PREPARE)
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To: bgill

Tortillas are a good idea. We don’t really eat a whole lot of bread. - Of course, I can probably mess up tortillas, too. - Ha. “Tortillas, Too”. That’s cute, sounds like a song. :o)


37 posted on 08/26/2012 3:08:00 PM PDT by Twinkie (John 3:16)
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To: JRandomFreeper

I’m going to build one of those next spring. It’ll make some awesome pizzas.


38 posted on 08/26/2012 3:11:07 PM PDT by Lurker (Violence is rarely the answer. But when it is it is the only answer.)
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To: Lurker
It's a lot of work if you make your own adobe bricks. Since I have more time than money, that's the way I'm going.

Of course, the drizzle we've had today has put the kibosh on making bricks for the day.

/johnny

39 posted on 08/26/2012 3:19:45 PM PDT by JRandomFreeper (Gone Galt)
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To: JRandomFreeper

I plan on making mine from builders clay and concrete. We lack the material for adobe brick where we live.


40 posted on 08/26/2012 3:33:59 PM PDT by Lurker (Violence is rarely the answer. But when it is it is the only answer.)
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To: bgill; djone

Keep a few pounds of seasoning/cure on hand. If the freezer goes down you can make jerky.
http://www.basspro.com/webapp/wcs/stores/servlet/Navigation?storeId=10151&catalogId=10051&langId=-1&searchTerm=cure


41 posted on 08/27/2012 12:36:43 AM PDT by outofsalt ("If History teaches us anything it's that history rarely teaches us anything")
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To: djone
Good Stuff Kart! We had a snow storm a few years ago that shut the entire city down for a week. We did good but one thing I didn’t prepare for was that with no electricity we had to eat every thing in the freezer. Some still spoiled.

Why didn't you bring the food outside once the freezer stopped being cool enough? If it was cold enough to snow, it was cold enough to freeze food (or at least keep it colder than in your house, which you presumably tried to keep warmer than it was outside).

Unfortunately, I will almost never have that option, being in South Texas. Of course, there's some advantage to the heat - we have a long growing season, and solar ovens are very practical (if I ever get around to buying or making one, that is).

42 posted on 08/27/2012 7:26:06 AM PDT by Ancesthntr (Bibi to Odumbo: Its not going to happen.)
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To: Kartographer

Below is my comment to the writer of the subject article, but it applies equally to you, Kartographer:

Gee, thanks a lot for showing me how UNprepared I am, and how much stuff I have to buy.

Seriously, thank you! We all have holes in our preps, and this article illustrates them for anyone who cares to read it. This is a big wake-up call.

For those that find this article insufficient motivation to do more (especially getting in shape and storing more food & water), I’d suggest a read of “One Second After.” I just re-read it this weekend, and it produced that same punch-in-the-gut feeling that I had after the first time I read it.


43 posted on 08/27/2012 7:59:48 AM PDT by Ancesthntr (Bibi to Odumbo: Its not going to happen.)
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To: drbuzzard
Luckily their family has a class 3 weapons permit and a couple Mac-10s...

First, there is no such thing as a "class 3 weapons permit", there are class III FFLs for dealers and class III licenses for manufactures of Class III items but no permit or license for people who buy them. You fill out an ATF Form 4, which requires mug shots, fingerprints, personal information, a sign-off from the chief law enforcement officer of your county/parish, location and name of class III dealer you are buying from with a signature of the owner of the business along with the weapon's serial number. The application will trigger background checks at local and federal levels. When the Form 4 is submitted to the ATF it must be accompanied by a $200.00 certified check to cover the "transfer tax" of the weapon. That's about it, except you must always have the "transfer tax" documentation in your possession when taking your weapon away from your registered home address. You may not take it across state lines nor can you move your residence with out notifying the ATF.

There are a few quirky things about ATF classifications of weapons, for instance if you want to buy a select fire rifle (semi/fully automatic) with a short barrel and a sound suppressor. The ATF considers each feature as a weapon. Therefore you are buying three weapons not just one assembly and must make an application to cover the semi/full auto feature, another for the short barrel, and still another for the suppressor. Each item will have a serial number traceable back to the transfer tax document(s) and each requiring a $200.00 tax stamp.

As to "standing watch" with a legal machine gun, there are likely legal pitfalls to such activity. First, taking your legal class III weapon on board is legal as long as you are within the boundaries of the state you reside in. If not and you get caught (Coast Guard Inspection???), you are looking at heavy fines and/or jail time. If you manage to get out into international waters with your goodies you are now on a par with all the rest of the pirates. And if you do make port in the Bahamas (or any other sovereign nation) you will be in deep kimchi if you start flashing the hardware around. That is also true of non class III stuff as well unless other arrangements have been made with the Harbormaster.

Regards,
GtG

PS Class III stuff is so damned expensive and so tightly regulated, most people consider it an "investment" and keep it locked away in their gun safe.

44 posted on 08/28/2012 6:09:01 PM PDT by Gandalf_The_Gray (I live in my own little world, I like it 'cuz they know me here.)
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To: Marcella

I might have to add that to my Christmas list. I used to make my own breads quite often, but a few years ago I messed up my shoulders and now kneading or rolling out dough is a painful experience.


45 posted on 09/01/2012 9:12:55 AM PDT by Ellendra ("It's astounding how often people mistake their own stupidity for a lack of fairness." --Thunt)
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To: Ellendra

“I messed up my shoulders and now kneading or rolling out dough is a painful experience.”

I know about painful shoulders. Right now, my left one is too painful to use other than pick up something very light. It’s hard to “rest” a shoulder, since one has to use his/her arms all the time and that’s shoulder movement.

I looked for the bread knead buckets for someone who contacted me, and they appear to be considered “antiques” now. I found two listed and one of those was on Ebay. That may be the best place to look first.


46 posted on 09/01/2012 10:52:06 AM PDT by Marcella (Conservatism is dead. PREPARE)
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