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Neil Armstrong
26 August 2012 | moonshot925

Posted on 08/26/2012 10:36:50 AM PDT by moonshot925

A great American hero has died. RIP.


TOPICS: Chit/Chat; History; Science
KEYWORDS: apollo; apollo11; moon; nasa; neilarmstrong; vanity


1 posted on 08/26/2012 10:37:01 AM PDT by moonshot925
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To: moonshot925

God Bless you Neil and rest in peace


2 posted on 08/26/2012 10:44:00 AM PDT by WomBom ("I read Free Republic for the pictures")
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To: moonshot925
A great American hero has died. RIP.

To paraphrase Nixon's undelivered speech:

"He will be mourned by his family and friends; he will be mourned by his nation; he will be mourned by the people of the world; he will be mourned by a Mother Earth that dared send her sons into the unknown.

In his exploration, he stirred the people of the world to feel as one; to bind more tightly the brotherhood of man.

In ancient days, men looked at stars and saw their heroes in the constellations. In modern times, we do much the same, but our heroes are epic men of flesh and blood.

Others followed him, and will surely find their way home, too. But this man was the first, and he will remain the foremost in our hearts.

For every human being who looks up at the moon in the nights to come will know that there is some corner of another world that is forever mankind."

3 posted on 08/26/2012 10:44:11 AM PDT by Alex Murphy
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To: moonshot925

I still have my Apollo 11 flight poster, that I won in a cub scout candy drive.

Who would have thought all these years later, we are still a one planet civilization. Robots are cool, but nothing like being there - as Neil and Buzz showed us all on July 20, 1969. They may have made the 1st “small step” but we failed to make the “great leap” to capitalize on their great accomplishment.


4 posted on 08/26/2012 10:46:41 AM PDT by anymouse (God didn't write this sitcom we call life, he's just the critic.)
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To: moonshot925

He was in my fraternity at Purdue a few years ahead of me.
RIP fellow Phi Delt.


5 posted on 08/26/2012 10:46:55 AM PDT by Datom
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To: moonshot925


6 posted on 08/26/2012 10:47:02 AM PDT by moonshot925
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To: KevinDavis

Space ping


7 posted on 08/26/2012 10:47:36 AM PDT by anymouse (God didn't write this sitcom we call life, he's just the critic.)
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To: moonshot925

NBC “News” yesterday called him “Neil Young”.

I’m not kidding. Levels and levels of factcheckers, you know.


8 posted on 08/26/2012 10:55:27 AM PDT by kjo (+)
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To: kjo
NBC “News” yesterday called him “Neil Young”. I’m not kidding. Levels and levels of factcheckers, you know.


9 posted on 08/26/2012 10:58:04 AM PDT by Alex Murphy
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To: kjo

Yes I saw that and it confused me because John Young was the 9th man the walk on the moon. So at first I thought he died.


10 posted on 08/26/2012 10:58:19 AM PDT by moonshot925
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To: moonshot925

Thank you for some great pictures. But be warned. Your newbieness may come into question.


11 posted on 08/26/2012 10:58:19 AM PDT by real saxophonist (CTHULHU 2012 - Why vote for a Lesser Evil?)
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To: moonshot925

The Apollo astronauts are passing away from old age and we STILL don’t have a moon base. But we have wasted Trillions on useless Welfare programs.

Space is the future of Mankind but our leaders are blind to that fact.


12 posted on 08/26/2012 11:19:19 AM PDT by desertfreedom765
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To: real saxophonist; moonshot925
Your newbieness may come into question.
for a short-term newbie (maybe a long-term lurker :)
...this is great stuff. :-D

13 posted on 08/26/2012 11:26:04 AM PDT by skinkinthegrass (WA DC E$tabli$hment; DNC/RNC/Unionists...Brazilian saying: "$@me Old $hit; w/ different flie$" :^)
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To: skinkinthegrass

I agree. It’s unfortunate we have to think like this.


14 posted on 08/26/2012 11:30:08 AM PDT by real saxophonist (CTHULHU 2012 - Why vote for a Lesser Evil?)
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To: moonshot925

Nice tribute.


15 posted on 08/26/2012 11:32:21 AM PDT by Moonman62 (The US has become a government with a country, rather than a country with a government.)
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To: anymouse
Robots are cool, but nothing like being there - as Neil and Buzz showed us all on July 20, 1969.

Robots and unmanned space craft are more than cool.

They have made thousands of discoveries and in fact we will be going over the data revealed by unmanned spacecraft and remote controlled rovers for many, many years into the future. In fact, unmanned missions are going to where man is not even able to go at this point. They are invaluable.

Some of the rovers and unmanned spacecraft are basically reconnaissance missions for men. Others go and will go where man cannot.

16 posted on 08/26/2012 11:41:40 AM PDT by dragnet2 (Diversion and evasion are tools of deceit)
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To: moonshot925
Many folks don't know the 'how and why' of the selection process of who would be the first of the Apollo astronauts to make the Moon landings.

Buzz Aldrin was selected for the first Apollo landing because he was far and away the most technically astute of all Apollo astronauts, with his advanced degrees in fields that a handful of human beings even had experience in -- namely his Doctorate of Astronautics from MIT, not to mention being third in his class at West Point graduating with a BS in Mechanical Engineering. Plus, he had a war record in Korea and was a USAF aerial gunnery instructor. Honestly, top that.

Neil Armstrong was chosen because of all the Apollo astronauts, he was far and away the best pilot and had proven himself to be cool and steady in a crisis: In Korea serving with the Navy, his carrier-based jet was hit by anti-aircraft fire but he flew it back to friendly territory with three feet of one wingtip entirely missing. In civilian programs, he'd survived numerous near disasters by skillfully piloting his aircraft out of great danger.

Armstrong became a test pilot for the National Advisory Committee for Aeronautics and had several close calls that by all rights could and probably should have killed him -- Once when part of a B-29 launch vehicle's wing was partially destroyed along with a catastrophic engine loss because of a misfired parasitical research aircraft attached to the B-29's wing. Other close calls were in the Bell X-1B and the frightening X-15 rocket plane, where in one mission it lost control at over 200,000 feet altitude while traveling at Mach 5.75. Armstrong piloted it back to base safely after going far off course, returning from the edge of space as an unpowered glider. Try to imagine.

His Gemini 8 mission with the Agena docking module was the first critical in-space system failure of a U.S. spacecraft which threatened the lives of the astronauts. Armstrong manually piloted his Gemini capsule out of a wildly uncontrolled spin that nearly caused the astronauts aboard to lose consciousness, then guided the spacecraft out of orbit into re-entry. In the Apollo program, he'd managed to eject from a 'Flying Bedstead' VTOL Lunar Landing Research Vehicle ('LRRV') before it crashed and exploded in an enormous fireball, the only injury to Armstrong was his bitten tongue.

The choice for Apollo 11 surface crew was settled by Aldrin's technical savvy where he was second to none in spaceflight academics, and Armstrong as the man who had skillfully demonstrated he was certainly the superior pilot in a field of America's finest lineup of pilots for his record of recovering splendidly from near catastrophic air and space disasters. Cool, calm, and professional in all cases where he very nearly lost his life. Many other astronauts and pilots who served with Neil Armstrong wrote personal accounts of him certainly being the best pilot they ever knew or flew with.

17 posted on 08/26/2012 11:57:22 AM PDT by The KG9 Kid (Semper Fi)
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To: The KG9 Kid

They were all heroes long before they ever landed on the Moon.


18 posted on 08/26/2012 11:59:02 AM PDT by dfwgator
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To: The KG9 Kid

Nicely spelled out.


19 posted on 08/26/2012 12:00:02 PM PDT by wastedyears (The First Law of Heavy Metal: Not all metal is satanic.)
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To: moonshot925
This is one of only two know photos of Neil Armstrong on the lunar surface. The other pic is a partial photo of him. In that one, he's nearly out of frame. This is the only one that shows him totally.


The reason only the two pics of him exists at all is that Neil had the duty of lunar photography and had handed the camera to Aldrin to take care of duties at the LM. I belive that this one was taken for another purpose other than taking one of Neil specifically. I am not even counting to footage taken from the DAC on board Eagle during the walk, nor am I counting the footage taken from the camera in the MEAS that showed the world THE STEP. Rest in peace Mr. Armstrong. You were truly an American hero in the true sense of the word. You will be missed.
20 posted on 08/26/2012 5:46:50 PM PDT by NCC-1701 (The LEFT's intolerance of the RIGHT is intolerable.)
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To: dragnet2

Reconnaissance is important, but not the end goal. We have gotten too used to letting the robots do the exploring and forgetting why we send them - so that we can go ourselves. Too easy to say, “oh, we’ll do that some day.” We’ve been putting off manned planetary exploration for far too long. Comdr. Armstrong’s passing highlights the atrophy of America’s exploration culture.


21 posted on 08/27/2012 8:31:59 PM PDT by anymouse (God didn't write this sitcom we call life, he's just the critic.)
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To: anymouse
Robots are cool, but nothing like being there - as Neil and Buzz showed us all on July 20, 1969.

Robots and unmanned space craft are more than cool.

They have made thousands of discoveries and in fact we will be going over the data revealed by unmanned spacecraft and remote controlled rovers for many, many years into the future. In fact, unmanned missions are going to where man is not even able to go at this point. They are invaluable.

Some of the rovers and unmanned spacecraft are basically reconnaissance missions for men. Others go and will go where man cannot.

Reconnaissance is important, but not the end goal. We have gotten too used to letting the robots do the exploring and forgetting why we send them - so that we can go ourselves. Too easy to say, “oh, we’ll do that some day.” We’ve been putting off manned planetary exploration for far too long. Comdr. Armstrong’s passing highlights the atrophy of America’s exploration culture.

As mentioned above, going to the lunar surface is fine and a huge achievement. No question. But it goes beyond the reconnaissance just for man.

Remember, the moon is only about 1/4 million miles away.

We just sent a rolling high end laboratory, complete with drilling equipment, soil analysis, sophisticated spectrometers and cameras 64 million miles away. It has a shelf life of hopefully 2-4 years maybe longer of driving around, analyzing and collecting data, etc. Other plans are underway to remotely bring samples back for study, and will be done relatively cheaply instead of sending a manned mission which would last a matter of hours or several days maybe on the surface.

The first Martian missions will be lucky to leave man on the surface maybe 48 hours. And the survival risk will be questionable. We should go when were prepared to stay for a longer period. We're not there yet.

My point is, we've sent spacecraft to the outer planets of the solar system where we have no means for sending man and returning him alive. Unmanned spacecraft have already done this, with data which continues to come back, and will be studied for many years to come.

Try orbiting the sun at a close distance in order to study it. Man can't but our unmanned spacecraft can and already did it. Try sending man with our current technology to orbit the planet Saturn and send back high end data for years...Saturn is a very very long way away.

One last thing, the Space Shuttle missions were great, but orbiting the earth like 24,000 times? It was relegated to resupplying the ISS.

What we have already learned and will continue learning by our unmanned spacecraft and planetary rovers, which would have taken man another 500+ years to achieve, and still would not have gone to the harsh environments our unmanned spacecraft already have been in.

At this point in our history, keeping a man alive for years at a time in space, would almost be the entire mission objective. Fuel, water, food, power etc. Unmanned spacecraft are not near as demanding and don't get near as hungry or thirsty as man. In fact 30 years later, some remain quite happy.

22 posted on 08/27/2012 9:52:28 PM PDT by dragnet2 (Diversion and evasion are tools of deceit)
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