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Tobacco and Nicotine Good as Pesticides
softpedia.com ^ | 10 october 2010 | Staff

Posted on 09/06/2012 8:41:37 AM PDT by Red Badger

Nicotine is bad for you and apparently it has the same poisonous effect on pests, getting scientists' attention for a potential alternative to traditional commercial pesticides.

Tobacco and nicotine make one of the-hardest-to-get-rid-of vices of modern society – smoking, which can lead to lung cancer and early death.

For hundreds of years now, tobacco leaves have been used on a small scale, as a natural organic pesticide, and as the growing concerns about health risk related to tobacco sales are harming tobacco farmers in some parts of the world, scientists looked for a new way of using this plant.

Dr Cedric Briens, Professor of Chemical Engineering at the University of Western Ontario, and Director of the Research and Development, of the Institute for Chemicals and Fuels from Alternative Resources (ICFAR), and colleagues, thought of using tobacco as a natural pesticide, due to its toxic content of nicotine.

They explained that tobacco leaves could be turned into pesticides by a process called pyrolysis, which involves heating up the tobacco leaves at 900 degrees Fahrenheit (482.2 degrees Celsius) in a vacuum.

From pyrolysis results an unrefined substance called bio-oil, which the scientists tested as a pesticide against a wide range of insect pests, including 11 different fungi, 4 bacteria, and the Colorado potato beetle (a major agricultural pest that is very resistant to insecticides).

This oil killed all of the beetles and stopped the growth of two types of bacteria and one type of fungus, and even after the nicotine was removed, the oil kept its pesticide properties.

Because tobacco bio-oil proved to be so effective, and also because it destroyed some but not all of the microorganisms, the team concluded that it could be very valuable as a selective pesticide, far better than those currently used.

It's no wonder that for centuries, gardeners have been using home-made mixtures of tobacco and water as a natural pesticide to kill insect pests.

Of this research could start a 'green' pesticide industry, tobacco farmers would regain an additional income and the world would have a new eco-friendly pest-control agent.

The report was published in ACS' bi-weekly journal Industrial & Engineering Chemistry Research.


TOPICS: Agriculture; Business/Economy; Food; Gardening
KEYWORDS: antitobaccoscam; foxglove; gardening; nicotine; pesticide; scam; smoking; smokingiscool; tobacco; tobaccoremedy; tobbaco
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Soaking a bunch of cigarette butts in water overnight, then straining the liquid, adding 2 teaspoons of dish detergent to a gallon of water makes an effective insecticide..........
1 posted on 09/06/2012 8:41:42 AM PDT by Red Badger
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To: Red Badger

Isn't that how Tomacco started?

2 posted on 09/06/2012 8:43:34 AM PDT by dfwgator (I'm voting for Ryan and that other guy.)
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To: Red Badger

And you don’t have to buy them. Just go to any parking lot and pick up all you want. Usually in small piles where people dump their ashtrays out.


3 posted on 09/06/2012 8:47:47 AM PDT by SkyDancer ("OF COURSE I TALK TO MYSELF - Sometimes I need an expert opinion")
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To: Red Badger

I had a bottle of nicotine nitrate solution, to be used in a spray emulsion. In the past, nicotine was a commercial pesticide.


4 posted on 09/06/2012 8:48:05 AM PDT by DBrow
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To: Red Badger
Nicotine is bad for you . . .

Then why does the Federal government subsidize its production?

5 posted on 09/06/2012 8:48:05 AM PDT by Arm_Bears (Re-distribute my work ethic, not my wealth.)
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To: dfwgator

First it starts with ‘just a cherry tomato’, then you get the need for something more. Then you begin on the salad size, say it’s just a little salad tomato, then before you know it you’re wolfing down Beefsteaks two at a time............


6 posted on 09/06/2012 8:49:17 AM PDT by Red Badger (Anyone who thinks wisdom comes with age is either too young or too stupid to know the difference....)
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To: Red Badger
Powder..patch..ball FIRE!

Be careful - Soaking tobacco and spraying the juice will do the same thing but can contain fungus that is contagious to tomato and potato plants - once in the soil it stays there.

7 posted on 09/06/2012 8:50:17 AM PDT by BallandPowder
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To: Red Badger

Pure nicotine is quite toxic. You can extract enough from three or four strong cigars to kill someone in less than a minute. I’ve read that if you squirted a full eyedropper of pure nicotine on the skin of a rabbit it will curl up and die.


8 posted on 09/06/2012 8:50:42 AM PDT by circlecity
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To: BallandPowder

I don’t recommend canned tobacco......


9 posted on 09/06/2012 8:52:03 AM PDT by Red Badger (Anyone who thinks wisdom comes with age is either too young or too stupid to know the difference....)
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To: Red Badger

so how do I get the bed bugs to light up?


10 posted on 09/06/2012 8:56:35 AM PDT by Buckeye McFrog
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To: Red Badger

The best way to get nicotine is from wild tobacco, Nicotiana rustica. Common tobacco is about 1-3% nicotine, but wild tobacco comes in at a hearty 9%.


11 posted on 09/06/2012 8:56:46 AM PDT by yefragetuwrabrumuy
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To: Red Badger

Deadly stuff that canned tobacco. Paw Paine used Prince Albert’s cans of tobacco in his pipe and rolled cigs, and he only lived into his early nineties. Probably had a can in his bib overlls when they found him.


12 posted on 09/06/2012 8:58:40 AM PDT by MHGinTN (Being deceived can be cured.)
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To: Red Badger
Nicotine is a natural insecticide.

Tobacco evolved it to keep insects from eating the plant. The mood-altering (and addictive) effects that humans get from smoking it is just a coincidence.

Of course, tobacco companies have since controlled nicotine content through selective breeding. But, man didn't invent the nicotine insecticide: nature/evolution did.

13 posted on 09/06/2012 8:58:59 AM PDT by justlurking (The only remedy for a bad guy with a gun is a good WOMAN (Sgt. Kimberly Munley) with a gun)
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To: DBrow
In the past, nicotine was a commercial pesticide.

I used a commercial nicotine-based pesticide in my home garden 25 years ago so this is nothing new. As I recall it wasn't very effective.

14 posted on 09/06/2012 9:01:44 AM PDT by Bernard Marx
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To: circlecity

I’ve heard that too. However, I put about a pound of cigarette butts in a gallon plastic jug, filled it with water and steeped it for about two years. Strained it out this summer for a pesticide and splashed a bunch of it on myself. Didn’t do a thing. It did make a colony of ants pick up and move though.


15 posted on 09/06/2012 9:01:53 AM PDT by TigersEye (dishonorabledisclosure.com - OPSEC (give them support))
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To: justlurking

I can really go for a cigar or pipe right now


16 posted on 09/06/2012 9:05:47 AM PDT by NativeSon ( Grease the floor with Crisco when I dance the Disco)
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To: Red Badger
Nicotine is bad for you and apparently it has the same poisonous effect on pests, getting scientists' attention for a potential alternative to traditional commercial pesticides.

This is news? I believe farmers/gardners have been using this for quite some time.

17 posted on 09/06/2012 9:06:52 AM PDT by MEGoody (You shall know the truth, and the truth shall make you free.)
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To: Red Badger

Scientists are working hard to miniaturize lighters and cigarettes, in hopes that they can get troublesome insects to become addicted and die off.


18 posted on 09/06/2012 9:07:29 AM PDT by lurk
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To: circlecity
Pure nicotine is quite toxic. You can extract enough from three or four strong cigars to kill someone in less than a minute. I’ve read that if you squirted a full eyedropper of pure nicotine on the skin of a rabbit it will curl up and die.

This is one of those "gee how scary is that" statements that is extremely misleading. Plants are full of natural insecticides that are quite toxic to humans when concentrated. Even vitamins, when concentrated, can become toxic at low levels, as can many other chemicals found in vegetables. Look at the number of "toxins" in a potato.

Nicotine poisoning and overdose is quite rare, and there is no indication that ingestion at less than toxic levels has any negative health implications, and there is considerable evidence of positive benefits from less than toxic levels of ingestion.


19 posted on 09/06/2012 9:08:42 AM PDT by jjsheridan5
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To: justlurking
Tobacco evolved it to keep insects from eating the plant.

Which begs the question why other plants did not also evolve this safe guard.

20 posted on 09/06/2012 9:09:17 AM PDT by MEGoody (You shall know the truth, and the truth shall make you free.)
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