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EU Bites the Hand that Feeds It: Gazprom Will Bite Back
Oilprice.com ^ | 09/10/2012 | Jen Alic

Posted on 09/11/2012 9:25:51 AM PDT by bananaman22

Gazprom has Europe’s natural gas market in a stranglehold and Europe is attempting to fight back, first with a raid last year on the Russian giant’s offices and then with a probe launched earlier this week against its allegedly illicit efforts to control the EU’s natural gas supplies.

The bottom line is that the same natural gas revolution in the US, which was enabled by hydraulic fracturing (fracking), is now threatening to loosen Gazprom’s noose on the EU, and Gazprom simply won’t have it.

To head off a potential natural gas revolution in the EU, Gazprom is pulling out all the stops, and EU officials say that the company has been illegally throwing obstacles in the way of European gas diversification.

Poland’s situation is a case in point. Last year, a US Department of Energy report estimated Poland’s shale gas reserves at 171 trillion cubic feet. Gazprom got nervous. In March this year, the Polish Geological Institute suddenly felt compelled to contradict that report, saying reserves were only around 24.8 trillion cubic feet. In June, Exxon announced it would pull out of its shale gas projects in Poland. Investors started getting cold feet and shares began to drop. Chevron and ConocoPhillips are plodding along with their shale gas operations, for now.

Still, 24.8 trillion cubic feet is no paltry volume and enough to ensure that Gazprom remains nervous. And then there is Ukraine, which also has sizable shale gas reserves and where the Russian noose is even tighter.

Right now, the only thing keeping the shale gas revolution from hitting Europe as it has in the US is technology: the shale reserves in Europe are on land that is more inaccessible, there is a lack of necessary infrastructure and fracking equipment, and protests against the environmental impact of fracking are more serious. But the biggest problem is Gazprom.

EU governments are both desperate to break the Russian stranglehold by developing shale gas reserves and wary of going up against a gas giant on whom they depend for supplies. It’s a tough position and the outcome will depend on how the EU hedges its bets: Can it develop enough shale gas reserves quickly enough to take on Gazprom?

Poland is still a long way off from being able to fully develop its shale gas reserves. It will take time to conduct the necessary environmental impact studies and infrastructure would require a major overhaul. Full article at: Europe Has Had Enough, But Can It Stand Up to Gazprom?


TOPICS: Business/Economy; Conspiracy
KEYWORDS: europe; fracking; gazprom; naturalgas

1 posted on 09/11/2012 9:26:02 AM PDT by bananaman22
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To: bananaman22

If Obama would agree we could start exporting cheap natural gas to Europe. Ukraine has been talking about building an LNG facility to receive shiploads.


2 posted on 09/11/2012 9:37:19 AM PDT by meatloaf (Support Senate S 1863 & House Bill 1380 to eliminate oil slavery.)
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To: bananaman22
Let Gazprom close all the pipelines to Europe this winter and watch next spring as every square inch of shale gas land sprout a well head.
3 posted on 09/11/2012 11:58:20 AM PDT by 2001convSVT (Going Galt as fast as I can.)
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