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Vanity: How many of you know someone who is "Crafty"?
Vanity Post | October 3, 2012 | The Working Man

Posted on 10/03/2012 7:16:10 AM PDT by The Working Man

My wife and I were discussing how our Farm Store business was doing, (Not all that well). The fleece from our Alpacas and the products that can be made from it are the focus of what we are doing while we build up the numbers of our Herd.

The big sellers are ready made items like stuffed toys, Finger puppets and some clothing. But what we are both surprised at is how few, (very, very few), people today do "crafty" things in their spare time. Things like knitting, crocheting, sewing, etc.

So that got me to thinking and here I am asking the question: How many of you do or know someone who does "crafty" things in their spare time? I'm not asking for specific answers about what they do just do they do "something". If you want to volunteer that information that would be nice too.

Now to our "Prepping community" here on Free Republic, do you think that the ability to do something "crafty" will be a beneficial skill to have in a SHTF world?


TOPICS: Agriculture; Gardening; Hobbies; Society
KEYWORDS: crafts; homebusiness; prepping; vanity
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1 posted on 10/03/2012 7:16:16 AM PDT by The Working Man
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To: The Working Man

Do you sell stuff on Etsy?

http://www.etsy.com


2 posted on 10/03/2012 7:17:57 AM PDT by Bon mots (Abu Ghraib: 47 Times on the front page of the NY Times | Benghazi: 2 Times)
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To: The Working Man

Of course it will be valuable.

For one thing, being able to hand sew will be useful for repairing clothes or making clothes or blankets/quilts out of material scraps.

If you can get yarn, then being able to knit or crochet will also be very valuable.


3 posted on 10/03/2012 7:19:50 AM PDT by luckystarmom
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To: The Working Man

my daughters inlaws are all crafty! sewing knitting,they paint, pottery, flower arranging.
They can’t cook however which I think is more important if the shtf.
hope that helps


4 posted on 10/03/2012 7:20:26 AM PDT by ronniesgal ( I miss George Bush. Hell, I miss Bill Clinton!!)
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To: The Working Man

I knit and crochet for fun and Christmas presents. For demographic purposes, I’m a 43-year-old married white female living in Houston.


5 posted on 10/03/2012 7:20:42 AM PDT by Xenalyte (Settle down, Beavis.)
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To: The Working Man

My wife manages a chain craft store. Her sales are doing well. It’s her opinion that people return to such endeavors as the economy worsens.


6 posted on 10/03/2012 7:21:03 AM PDT by bcsco (Bourbon gets better with age...I age better with Bourbon.)
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To: The Working Man

“Crafty” means “sneaky”.


7 posted on 10/03/2012 7:21:39 AM PDT by BenLurkin (This is not a statement of fact. It is either opinion or satire; or both)
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To: The Working Man

I took up knitting two years ago as a hobby. Lately, I have been thinking it might be a useful skill if the SHTF in this world and have been thinking about learning more about felting, spinning and weaving.

(I’ve also started stockpiling yarn - altho my husband calls it hoarding.)


8 posted on 10/03/2012 7:21:39 AM PDT by Dinah Lord
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To: Bon mots

Yes, we do have an ETSY storefront. As well as our own on-line store.


9 posted on 10/03/2012 7:22:29 AM PDT by The Working Man
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To: The Working Man

i knit my own tutu


10 posted on 10/03/2012 7:22:57 AM PDT by Fester Chugabrew (ABO to the core.)
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To: The Working Man; secret garden

xs stands for cross-stitch, and SG is a knitting fool.


11 posted on 10/03/2012 7:23:56 AM PDT by xsmommy
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To: The Working Man

I am a crafter. I actually hold a crafting group. (About half the time I am the only member in attendance).

I am very good with a needle except when I do big frame quilting. I hand repair clothing and make all sorts of things out of scrap yarn via crochet. My coaster are crochet and I have made reusable crochet swiffers. I’d like to be a better knitter, however, I need to commit to a class.

Most crafting though is copying, experimenting and self teaching. Those are the habits that I think will help people survive than the actual craft.

Several of my female friends/acquaintances do some sort of crafting so it’s probably not as rare as you think.


12 posted on 10/03/2012 7:24:00 AM PDT by PrincessB (Drill Baby Drill.)
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To: The Working Man

Well, I can sew clothing, can beef and chicken (I buy on sale), can jams and sauces, cook and I hand/home make some gifts. I guess I’m crafty ;)


13 posted on 10/03/2012 7:26:32 AM PDT by Jane Long (Soli Deo Gloria!)
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To: BenLurkin

“Crafty” means “sneaky”.


Yes indeed it does, but around here it also means you can do things with your hands. Probably just a local colloquialism.


14 posted on 10/03/2012 7:28:14 AM PDT by The Working Man
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To: The Working Man

There are lots of us crafty ones out here! I can knit and crochet. I can handstitch well. I can quilt. Now, to find the time I would like to spend on it - well that is something else!


15 posted on 10/03/2012 7:28:22 AM PDT by freemama
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To: PrincessB
My coaster are crochet and I have made reusable crochet swiffers.

I'll have to tell my wife about the swiffers. She crochets kitchen wash cloths (always working on something), but I don't think she's thought of this idea.

16 posted on 10/03/2012 7:29:51 AM PDT by bcsco (Bourbon gets better with age...I age better with Bourbon.)
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To: The Working Man

I do creative art with glass. I also knit, crochet and sew.


17 posted on 10/03/2012 7:30:48 AM PDT by jersey117
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To: The Working Man

I am very crafty but spend all my spare time on FR so I never get around to doing any crafts... lol


18 posted on 10/03/2012 7:32:03 AM PDT by Anti-Hillary (Barry, Barry quite contrary, how does your government grow?...)
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To: The Working Man
Now to our "Prepping community" here on Free Republic, do you think that the ability to do something "crafty" will be a beneficial skill to have in a SHTF world?

If you have a useful craft, you can find work in any town during an emergency.

Farmers would need cheese makers if there is no electric, for example. Most milk farmers wouldn't know how to make cheese from scratch, and would be willing to keep you and your family on in exchange for preserving their harvest, or offer you cheese to eat yourself in exchange for your labor and knowledge.

Yes. Everyone should have a craft that fills a need, and can be completed only with those things that grow or can be found naturally somehow, because there would be no stores.

19 posted on 10/03/2012 7:35:20 AM PDT by concerned about politics ("Get thee behind me, Liberal")
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To: The Working Man

I know lots of sneaky people.


20 posted on 10/03/2012 7:35:37 AM PDT by moviefan8
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To: The Working Man; Ellendra

I knit. My daughter sews. I haven’t knitted anything in over 2 years, after knitting an afghan a year for several years. I found that people were “treasuring” my creations in storage, rather than using them, as I’d intended. Although I think the prayer shawl I knitted with alpaca yarn did get used a little.


21 posted on 10/03/2012 7:35:48 AM PDT by knittnmom (Save the earth! It's the only planet with chocolate!)
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To: The Working Man

Vanity: How many of you know someone who is “Crafty”?

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

I think there was a Crafty around here a few years ago. I think he got the zot.


22 posted on 10/03/2012 7:36:28 AM PDT by Responsibility2nd (NO LIBS. This Means Liberals and (L)libertarians! Same Thing. NO LIBS!!)
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To: The Working Man

Obama is not smart, just crafty.


23 posted on 10/03/2012 7:39:13 AM PDT by ImJustAnotherOkie (zerogottago)
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To: The Working Man

Since the 70’s I have been crocheting, knitting, sewing clothes, quilting, soap-making, and in the 90’s I added handspinning,
(with ashford wheels)
Machine embroidery, small rug making, art, cooking and
fixing things.
In 1980’s we raised a hog, heated only with wood, cured hams, raised chickens, rabbits and grew vegetables and herbs.
Canning, drying, preserving etc.
We have been honing our skills for years.
We have tools.
Everyone should teach themselves at least one valuable skill that produces something so they have a means to barter.


24 posted on 10/03/2012 7:41:38 AM PDT by two23
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To: The Working Man
Things like knitting, crocheting, sewing, etc.

Socks will be very valuable during hard times in cold weather. Hats, scarves, and mittens as well.

Because there will be no forced heat, scrap quilts will be a necessity.

I try to think colonial, or non electric. No fuel, no electric, which means we'd be on our own with nothing but what we already have or can create. "How did the colonialists do it?" or "How did the American Indians do it?"

25 posted on 10/03/2012 7:42:13 AM PDT by concerned about politics ("Get thee behind me, Liberal")
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To: The Working Man

I do. I can sew and quilt. I can weave and have three looms. I have two spinning wheels, but that skill is currently lagging. One wheel is a modern version, the other a classic wool great wheel, missing a part.
I also paint still life and landscapes.


26 posted on 10/03/2012 7:43:05 AM PDT by Wiser now (Socialism does not eliminate poverty, it guarantees it.)
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To: The Working Man

I’d love to have the time!


27 posted on 10/03/2012 7:44:27 AM PDT by pgkdan (A vote for anyone but Romney is a vote for obama. GO MITT!!)
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To: The Working Man

Have craft stuff sitting in my sewing room next to my untouched sewing machine! It seems that I have been too busy with other things to even take time to clean out that room, but am getting the urge lately to start knitting again.

My mother believed in teaching me & my sister at an early age how to sew with a machine, do hand sewing, embroidery, knitting, crochet, even weaving.

I do believe if the SHTF that these skills will be important either to continue to provide clothing and bags (useful for carrying any kind of item), as well as bartering and training others how to sew.

I think it will be useful to remake clothing out of older clothes, leather hides, etc. So I guess I might be one of those grandmothers you want to keep around (plus I can shoot, cook, tend a garden, teach children, etc.)...but I sure hope it doesn’t ever come to this. Been watching “Revolution” on tv and it has brought up some very interesting conversations at my house!

BTW: My sister is an avid quilter and knitter—she even has a spinning wheel! We definitely appreciate the cotton growers and the folks who provide the various types of wool we use. BIG thanks!!!


28 posted on 10/03/2012 7:45:21 AM PDT by sassy steel magnolia (USAF life and Navy wife...God Bless the USA!)
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To: The Working Man
I come from an extremely crafty family. My sister has a lot more ideas than I do as far as doing crafty things in her home, but I guess she just enjoys it more.

My Aunts 5 of them are just amazing! They do incredible things from making wedding cakes for family members to decorative items for the home. Christmas swaps are always hand made items. Every year you can't wait to see what ideas they have come up with. These items are then treasured year after year.

Does that help?

My grandmother who was wheel chair bound due to Rheumatoid Arthritis use to make barbie doll clothes, Christmas decorations and she would make amazing paint by number pictures using tweezers, glue, and fish tank rocks.

Here is a photo of the Geisha girl that she did in these rocks.

Image and video hosting by TinyPic

The photo doesn't do it justice.
29 posted on 10/03/2012 7:46:07 AM PDT by jcsjcm (This country was built on exceptionalism and individualism. In God we Trust - Laus Deo)
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To: The Working Man

My wife knits and crochets, plus she makes jelly. I’m sure she could can other things as well.

For my part, I work on our cars and know enough about carpentry to make things that serve their intended purpose even if they don’t look terribly pretty. My last major project was a teardrop trailer.


30 posted on 10/03/2012 7:47:11 AM PDT by ZirconEncrustedTweezers (Vote Romney to stop Obama. Vote conservative Congresspeople to stop Romney.)
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To: The Working Man

My wife is very good at most hand crafts(sewing knitting etc). Me not so much. As for the SHTF world, I don’t see it happinin any time soon but you never do, do ya?


31 posted on 10/03/2012 7:47:38 AM PDT by Phlap (REDNECK@LIBARTS.EDU)
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To: jcsjcm

Beautiful!

My dad used to do Intarsia’s before his Hips got too bad to stand on for long periods of time. He also used to make hand made knives and furniture. I’ve learned a lot from him!


32 posted on 10/03/2012 7:49:39 AM PDT by The Working Man
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To: The Working Man

mom and sister both quilt. Mom can (but hasnt for years spin and weave) I can weave, draw, paint, carve wood—badly, design and sew basic crude clothing articles and a few other artsy craftsy skills . My wife knits and mom falls into that category as well. gads i think evrry adult in my or my wifes immediate family does at least something .....


33 posted on 10/03/2012 7:50:19 AM PDT by BudgieRamone (Everybody loves a bonk on the head.)
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To: PrincessB
I am very good with a needle except when I do big frame quilting.

I have a big frame, but it takes up too much room. When scrap quiting, I usually use the lap quiting method. I can carry it around with me if I want, because the sections are done in smaller pieces - any size I want. It's easier to just do it on my lap while watching tv at night.

Eventually, I have to sew all the pieces together, but even that stays smaller for a while. I do it in rows.

34 posted on 10/03/2012 7:50:50 AM PDT by concerned about politics ("Get thee behind me, Liberal")
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To: BenLurkin

I know several Bookies.


35 posted on 10/03/2012 7:53:33 AM PDT by massgopguy (I owe everything to George Bailey)
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To: The Working Man

Oh that sounds wonderful! I hope you have some of his work - keep it and treasure it!

I feel extremely lucky to have this artwork from my grandmother. I hope to pass it down through the generations and it stays in the family!


36 posted on 10/03/2012 7:53:45 AM PDT by jcsjcm (This country was built on exceptionalism and individualism. In God we Trust - Laus Deo)
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To: The Working Man

My sister and mother knit, crochet and sew. I am currently crocheting a red, white and blue afghan to be followed by a camo one for the fiancee’. My sister and I also quilt and make pottery. My sister dehydrates food andI am getting ready to start as well as canning. I am stocking up on yarn so I can still make warm coverings when the SHTF probably in 12-18 mos from now.


37 posted on 10/03/2012 7:54:11 AM PDT by Georgia Girl 2 (The only purpose of a pistol is to fight your way back to the rifle you should never have dropped.)
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To: The Working Man

I do carpentry, electrical, plumbing,fix cars/trucks, paint, shoot rifles/shotguns/handguns, reload my own ammo, fix stuff,etc. My sons also do the same. We try to fix stuff before buying new.

Now that I am retired - I am called a lot to do the above for others that can’t or won’t - go source of walkin’ around $’s.


38 posted on 10/03/2012 7:56:02 AM PDT by TNoldman (AN AMERICAN FOR A MUSLIM/BHO FREE AMERICA.)
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To: two23
small rug making

We make braided and twined rag rugs from old used clothing that can't be used for scrap quilts. No need to toss them out.
I suppose in an emergency, these could also be used for floor mats for relatives who "unexpectedly" show up at the door.

I used to have Shetland sheep, so I have an Ashford wheel. We eventually let them die off from old age, because we were afraid we wouldn't be able to feed them in an emergency. No fuel means no hay or grain. I miss them - a lot.

39 posted on 10/03/2012 8:01:54 AM PDT by concerned about politics ("Get thee behind me, Liberal")
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To: The Working Man

My hubby is a woodworker. To me it looks like he collects expensive woodworking equipment. He has taken over the three car garage and I have to park in the driveway. He made me two beautiful end tables that only cost $20,000, when you add in the jointer, planer, dovetail jig, etc., that he had to have to make them.


40 posted on 10/03/2012 8:08:38 AM PDT by sportutegrl
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To: The Working Man

I am crafty. I have knitted since I was about 12 (many many years ago) and after 9/11 taught myself to crochet, since I figured they wouldn’t let me take my needles on a plane. I also have done a lot of embroidery and other needle work. I can sew, but hate it.

I also can..... mostly jams and jellies for Christmas presents, though I have done pressure canning for preserving the garden.

I have refinished furniture, painted, cook, bake and teach baking and cake decorating, and will be teaching myself to spin.... so I can teach the boyscouts.

My current craft project is a present for my almost 1 year old grand angel. I have knitted her a purse, covered it with flowers, and filled it with knit and crochet butterflies. That way she can practice putting in and taking out, counting, and colors. (it also uses left over bits and pieces of yarn)

Most of the purpose of my crafting is to give unique gifts. So many of my friends and family have everything they need, that it is hard to purchase an appropriate present for them.


41 posted on 10/03/2012 8:08:48 AM PDT by Grammy
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To: PrincessB

” I have made reusable crochet swiffers”

great idea! What type of yarn do you use?

In answer to main thread question: I sew and crochet


42 posted on 10/03/2012 8:13:52 AM PDT by Mrs. B.S. Roberts
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To: The Working Man

I sometimes make wreaths, and I used to be very into decorative painting with acrylics, and painting glassware. I’ve gotten away from it for some reason, although I usually do a bit at Christmastime.

I’d love to be able to sew or knit, but I have absolutely no aptitude with needles, and little patience to try.


43 posted on 10/03/2012 8:14:49 AM PDT by CatherineofAragon (Don't be afraid to see what you see. (Ronald Reagan))
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To: The Working Man

I sew quite a bit (mostly costumes) and am now learning how to fold origami flowers and using those & other unique materials to make bouquets and corsages. My daughter and I did the flowers/decorations for her wedding & saved a lot of money! It’s really been just for fun, but we were thinking of setting up an Etsy page at some point, we’ll see.


44 posted on 10/03/2012 8:17:02 AM PDT by twyn1
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To: The Working Man
Yes, I picked up a craft years ago from my grandfather... the ability to make fishing nets. When I was a kid in Louisiana, just about all the older men I knew had a netting (not knitting) needle in the bottom of their fishing tackle boxes.

They mostly made crab nets and crawfish nets, but some, like my grandfather, made cast nets. To anyone who can knit or crochet, this would be dead easy.

45 posted on 10/03/2012 8:23:20 AM PDT by Charles Martel (Endeavor to persevere...)
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To: The Working Man

I teach quilting online. But, I do all that other stuff as well, including tatting.


46 posted on 10/03/2012 8:47:49 AM PDT by rbbeachkid (Get out of its way and small business can fix the economy.)
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To: The Working Man

47 posted on 10/03/2012 8:48:52 AM PDT by martin_fierro (< |:)~)
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To: The Working Man

When I was growing up, “crafty” meant sneaky or untrusworthy.


48 posted on 10/03/2012 8:57:26 AM PDT by JimRed (Excise the cancer before it kills us; feed &water the Tree of Liberty! TERM LIMITS, NOW & FOREVER!)
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To: Mrs. B.S. Roberts

Here is a link to the article/pattern.

http://blog.makezine.com/craft/craft_pattern_crocheted_revers/

I really do use scraps, mainly cotton & acryllic. Although the next one will have a nice piece of silk mohair in it.


49 posted on 10/03/2012 9:00:45 AM PDT by PrincessB (Drill Baby Drill.)
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To: The Working Man

Isew and knit.


50 posted on 10/03/2012 9:04:22 AM PDT by Andy'smom
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