Free Republic
Browse · Search
General/Chat
Topics · Post Article

Skip to comments.

La Bastida unearths 4,200-year-old fortification, unique in continental Europe
Eurekalert! ^ | September 27, 2012 | Maria Jesus Delgado

Posted on 10/06/2012 6:42:28 AM PDT by SunkenCiv

...The discovery, together with all other discoveries made in recent years, reaffirm that the city was the most advanced settlement in Europe in political and military terms during the Bronze Age (ca. 4,200 years ago -2,200 BCE-), and is comparable only to the Minoan civilisation of Crete...

The fortification consisted of a wall measuring two to three metres thick, built with large stones and lime mortar and supported by thick pyramid-based towers located at short distances of some four metres. The original height of the defensive wall was approximately 6 or 7 metres. Until now six towers have been discovered along a length of 70 metres, although the full perimeter of the fortification measured up to 300 metres. The entrance to the enclosure was a passageway constructed with strong walls and large doors at the end, held shut with thick wooden beams.

One of the most relevant architectural elements discovered is the ogival arched postern gate, or secondary door, located near the main entrance. The arch is in very good conditions and is the first one to be found in Prehistoric Europe. Precedents can be found in the second city of Troy (Turkey) and in the urban world of the Middle East (Palestine, Israel and Jordan), influenced by the civilisations of Mesopotamia and Egypt. This indicates that people from the East participated in the construction of the fortification. These people would have reached La Bastida after the crisis which devastated their region 4,300 years ago. It was not until some 400 to 800 years later that civilisations like the Hittites and Mycenaeans, or city-states such as Ugarit, incorporated these innovative methods into their military architecture.

(Excerpt) Read more at eurekalert.org ...


TOPICS: History; Science; Travel
KEYWORDS: godsgravesglyphs; labastida; minoans; mycenaeans; spain; troy; valencia

from 2010:
1 posted on 10/06/2012 6:42:41 AM PDT by SunkenCiv
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | View Replies]

To: StayAt HomeMother; Ernest_at_the_Beach; decimon; 1010RD; 21twelve; 24Karet; 2ndDivisionVet; ...

 GGG managers are SunkenCiv, StayAt HomeMother & Ernest_at_the_Beach
To all -- please ping me to other topics which are appropriate for the GGG list.


2 posted on 10/06/2012 6:50:47 AM PDT by SunkenCiv (https://secure.freerepublic.com/donate/)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | View Replies]

To: SunkenCiv

Ante-diluvian bump!


3 posted on 10/06/2012 6:57:58 AM PDT by BenLurkin (This is not a statement of fact. It is either opinion or satire; or both)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 2 | View Replies]

To: SunkenCiv

http://www.la-bastida.com/LaBastida/


4 posted on 10/06/2012 7:03:48 AM PDT by visualops (artlife.us)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: SunkenCiv
Somehow I am not too surprised that perhaps the oldest “for war” ruins in continental Europe are in the Basque country—they is ornery critters to this day.
5 posted on 10/06/2012 7:06:43 AM PDT by Happy Rain ("Water is wet and Obama is a liar.")
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: SunkenCiv
The latest excavations and the result of Carbon 14 dating indicate that La Bastida was probably the most powerful city of Europe during the Bronze Age and a fortified site since it was first built, in circa 2,200 BCE, with a defence system never before seen in Europe.

This is the sort of flawed thinking that grates at me. The logic goes thus:

That last one is a joke but it illustrates that the prior assumptions were based on equally flawed logic.

6 posted on 10/06/2012 7:07:14 AM PDT by pepsi_junkie (Who is John Galt?)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: SunkenCiv
The wall protected a city measuring 4 hectares located on top of a hill. With architectural elements reminiscent of people with Eastern styled military skills, its model is typical of ancient civilisations of the Mediterranean, such as the second city of Troy.

Four hectares is a little under 10 acres. A perimeter of 300 meters makes it a little under two modern city blocks. A nice fortress, but not a huge city, even 4 thousand years ago. Babylonian Ur was 54 acres.

Looking up the location on google maps has me scratching my head. It's not near a river or sea, as most cities tend to be.

7 posted on 10/06/2012 7:22:30 AM PDT by PapaBear3625 (Charlie Daniels - Payback Time http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=EWwTJj_nosI)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: pepsi_junkie
If you spent half your life scrapping in the dirt and finally found something to maybe justify your professional existence would you downplay it?

I remember a while back when various australopithecine fossils were being found all over East and Southern Africa and each finding was always presented as a bit older than the previous oldest. The competition to find the original “missing link” almost had early hominids riding dinosaurs...but then modern academia has been so corrupted by the Leftist agenda it now resembles the "Shadow Science" of the former Soviet Union and thus all theories and discoveries must be taken with a grain of salt big enough to sink the Titanic if it were floating in the North Atlantic.

8 posted on 10/06/2012 7:27:38 AM PDT by Happy Rain ("Water is wet and Obama is a liar.")
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 6 | View Replies]

To: PapaBear3625
It's on a line of trade ~ probably on the end of that line ~ stretching East across the Mediterranean hopping island to island ~ to peninsula to island ~ all the way into the Eastern Mediterranean.

So, what was the quarry? Pretty big investment in fortress stuff for the time ~ so they must have been piling up trade goods to move East to more urban markets, and, at the same time, keeping the hunters and farmers out of their storehouses ~ maybe doing slaves as well. Blond buxomy huntress types~! In an age of very high maternal death rates brought about by particularly abominable indoor housing conditions, they'd been a serious item.

9 posted on 10/06/2012 7:42:12 AM PDT by muawiyah
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 7 | View Replies]

To: pepsi_junkie
It does seem they feel obliged to spin an elaborate story out of not much. I suspect puffing up the importance of a "find" is useful in securing additional grant money to finance the next phase of the project.
10 posted on 10/06/2012 7:45:04 AM PDT by hinckley buzzard
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 6 | View Replies]

To: SunkenCiv
"These people would have reached La Bastida after the crisis which devastated their region 4,300 years ago."

This?

Disaster That Struck The Ancients

11 posted on 10/06/2012 7:48:11 AM PDT by blam
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: visualops

Thanks visualops.


12 posted on 10/06/2012 8:38:17 AM PDT by SunkenCiv (https://secure.freerepublic.com/donate/)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 4 | View Replies]

To: BenLurkin; Happy Rain

:’)


13 posted on 10/06/2012 8:51:22 AM PDT by SunkenCiv (https://secure.freerepublic.com/donate/)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 3 | View Replies]

To: pepsi_junkie; Happy Rain; hinckley buzzard

The site is the largest heavily fortified site in Europe known from that time; it’s a reasonable guess that it didn’t get built so sissy inhabitants could cower down behind the walls when their more powerful neighbors came in. As with the somewhat later Mycenaean sites in Greece and at Troy, the high-walled citadel was the stronghold from which a city-state was ruled, and that most of the habitation was outside the walls, iow, not yet identified and excavated.

IMHO, it’s also reasonable to guess that it’s the first one found, but nowhere near the last one of its kind in Europe.


14 posted on 10/06/2012 8:56:38 AM PDT by SunkenCiv (https://secure.freerepublic.com/donate/)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 6 | View Replies]

To: PapaBear3625; muawiyah; blam

Early cities were on trade routes and near a water supply. There was a lot of overland trade, then as now. The great civilizations we know most about arose in major river basins, where irrigation was simple to implement and agricultural surplus was consistent, leading to large standing armies, recordkeeping for tracking of food production and property boundaries — recordkeeping in its turn led to writing systems — and a larger population in better health that had to occupy itself with other business (or in the case of Egypt and Mesopotamia, in large cultic building projects).

One of the “Atlantis was really here” groups have found a coastal civilization in Iberia which may have been wiped by a tsunami, an event that is bound to have happened more than once.


15 posted on 10/06/2012 9:03:10 AM PDT by SunkenCiv (https://secure.freerepublic.com/donate/)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 7 | View Replies]

To: SunkenCiv
The site is the largest heavily fortified site in Europe known from that time; it’s a reasonable guess that it didn’t get built so sissy inhabitants could cower down behind the walls when their more powerful neighbors came in. As with the somewhat later Mycenaean sites in Greece and at Troy, the high-walled citadel was the stronghold from which a city-state was ruled, and that most of the habitation was outside the walls, iow, not yet identified and excavated.

Fortification goes hand-in-hand with agriculture. You need someplace secure to store the harvested grain, and other wealth of the area, so wandering bands of barbarians cant just raid you and carry off your food supply.

16 posted on 10/06/2012 9:41:31 AM PDT by PapaBear3625 (Charlie Daniels - Payback Time http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=EWwTJj_nosI)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 14 | View Replies]

To: PapaBear3625

Preppers, who knew!


17 posted on 10/06/2012 9:56:47 AM PDT by GOYAKLA (Recall/ Impeachment Day, November 6, 2012. FUBO, same for RINOs)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 16 | View Replies]

To: SunkenCiv
Is archaeological discovery infinite?

Zillions of digs have been going on for hundreds of years now—is there a limit to welfare government hand-outs to the many superfluous archeology and anthropology grads who hope the Marxist in Chief forgives their student debt so that they may never have to work or think for a living and so can pleasantly zone out with benighted speculative theorizing sans objectivity currently appallingly fashionable to modern Leftist scientific dogma today.

18 posted on 10/06/2012 10:08:04 AM PDT by Happy Rain ("Water is wet and Obama is a liar.")
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 14 | View Replies]

To: Happy Rain

That was idiotic.


19 posted on 10/06/2012 1:07:50 PM PDT by SunkenCiv (https://secure.freerepublic.com/donate/)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 18 | View Replies]

To: SunkenCiv
Perhaps a little tin foil hatted, but far from idiotic FRiend.
Lighten up, don't be as glum as your name. This is a political forum after all regardless of your apolitical yet informative and often entertaining contributions;)
20 posted on 10/06/2012 2:33:52 PM PDT by Happy Rain ("Water is wet and Obama is a liar.")
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 19 | View Replies]

To: Happy Rain

If you really believed these topics were informative, you wouldn’t have made your rant in the first place, so save your BS.


21 posted on 10/06/2012 9:26:14 PM PDT by SunkenCiv (https://secure.freerepublic.com/donate/)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 20 | View Replies]

To: SunkenCiv
I was talking about YOUR apolitical contributions not mine being informative...

...sheesh, whatta grouch.

22 posted on 10/07/2012 6:13:05 AM PDT by Happy Rain ("Water is wet and Obama is a liar.")
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 21 | View Replies]

To: pepsi_junkie
Oh, c’mon. EVERYBODY knows that the Basques are direct descendants of the Atlanteans, and this is fortress was merely an outpost of mighty Atlantis.
23 posted on 10/08/2012 6:20:31 AM PDT by Little Ray (AGAINST Obama in the General.)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 6 | View Replies]

To: Happy Rain; SunkenCiv

This isn’t the Basque town. This site is in Murcia, not far from the southeastern coast. The town was part of the Argaric civilization, early adopters of bronzeworking.


24 posted on 10/08/2012 5:26:57 PM PDT by colorado tanker
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 5 | View Replies]

To: colorado tanker

Thanks ct.


25 posted on 10/08/2012 7:07:06 PM PDT by SunkenCiv (https://secure.freerepublic.com/donate/)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 24 | View Replies]

Disclaimer: Opinions posted on Free Republic are those of the individual posters and do not necessarily represent the opinion of Free Republic or its management. All materials posted herein are protected by copyright law and the exemption for fair use of copyrighted works.

Free Republic
Browse · Search
General/Chat
Topics · Post Article

FreeRepublic, LLC, PO BOX 9771, FRESNO, CA 93794
FreeRepublic.com is powered by software copyright 2000-2008 John Robinson