Free Republic
Browse · Search
General/Chat
Topics · Post Article

Skip to comments.

Kim Komando: Browse like Bond: How to surf the Web like a spy
The Kim Komando Show ^ | October 6, 2012 | Kim Komando

Posted on 10/06/2012 11:21:18 AM PDT by EveningStar

When you surf the Internet, everyone is watching...

Well, it's not as hard as you may think to browse anonymously and preserve your privacy. All you need are a few tools and some coaching in covert ops.

That's where I come in. Just call me Komando...Kim Komando...

(Excerpt) Read more at komando.com ...


TOPICS: Chit/Chat; Computers/Internet; Science; Society
KEYWORDS: computers; internet; internetsecurity; kimkomando; komando; privacy; surfprivately; surfweb; surfwebprivately; vpn; websurfingprivacy

1 posted on 10/06/2012 11:21:23 AM PDT by EveningStar
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | View Replies]

To: EveningStar

There was a time when I listened to the Kim Komando radio broadcast, but I haven’t caught it in a long time. I did learn some pointers from her, though, and enjoyed her programs.


2 posted on 10/06/2012 11:27:06 AM PDT by basil (Second Amendment Sisters.org)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: call meVeronica

Bump


3 posted on 10/06/2012 11:37:32 AM PDT by call meVeronica
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 2 | View Replies]

To: EveningStar
Kim talks about using a VPN in the article.

I just bought a new router and installed DD-WRT on it so I could use a VPN like http://hidemyass.com/.

Does any Freeper using a VPN have any advice?

4 posted on 10/06/2012 12:02:09 PM PDT by E. Pluribus Unum (Government is the religion of the psychopath.)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: basil
So, if I understand this correctly, if Obama gets reelected and continues on his path of executive orders and unconstitutional actions without hardly a peep from Congress, he could easily identify every source of the comments posted anonymously on Free Republic and other websites, as well as private emails? Actually he could be doing it now, right?
5 posted on 10/06/2012 12:11:41 PM PDT by Nevadan
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 2 | View Replies]

To: E. Pluribus Unum
Does any Freeper using a VPN have any advice?

Yes.

Do not rely on anything to preserve your anonymity when you access the internet.

At the level of the National Government, the internet is pretty much an open book - especially in the US. Most screen names can be traced to their authors within a few seconds, regardless of what countermeasures that you use. At best you might hold off a trace for a few minutes.

VPN relay servers merely act as registration agents for the Agencies. You might just as well send them your name and address.

6 posted on 10/06/2012 12:28:05 PM PDT by flamberge (What next?)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 4 | View Replies]

To: E. Pluribus Unum

Just look up stuff in Utah. All your internet belongs to us.


7 posted on 10/06/2012 12:35:38 PM PDT by eyedigress ((zOld storm chaser from the west)/?)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 4 | View Replies]

To: basil
I heard her "info break" (or whatever a radio "moment" is called) earlier in the week. She's hawking the backup company that dropped Limbaugh.

I wrote off Komando a while back for some "opinion" she gave on something or another that was obviously an opinion she was paid to have.

That's not to say she might have news you could use, but I almost always automatically tune her out.

8 posted on 10/06/2012 12:40:14 PM PDT by Calvin Locke
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 2 | View Replies]

To: Nevadan

Yes.


9 posted on 10/06/2012 12:42:03 PM PDT by Shady (Hey, King Bozo Osmocote....you can't hide the truth anymore..)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 5 | View Replies]

To: flamberge
If Obama gets a second term, we can assume that everything ever posted or written will become available and subject to action as Obama's Regime determines who is effectively a party member and who is not. Support for Dear Leader can easily become a requisite for first tier access to health care, government benefits and programs; never mind the flip side of direct reprisals via the IRS and other investigations.
10 posted on 10/06/2012 12:42:05 PM PDT by Truth29
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 6 | View Replies]

To: Calvin Locke

I think she does a good job. She is very well versed on programs that can help out. I really don’t care about her endorsements. Plus she is a Hottie!


11 posted on 10/06/2012 12:43:58 PM PDT by eyedigress ((zOld storm chaser from the west)/?)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 8 | View Replies]

To: EveningStar
Bond doesn't "browse" or "surf the web."

He forces somebody else to do it at gunpoint.

12 posted on 10/06/2012 12:46:02 PM PDT by x
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: Nevadan

The short answer is yes but there is tremendous volume and finding a specific individual’s comments in that sea of information is no easy task.

Those who wish to remain truly anonymous will use multiple relays through various countries with all kinds of fancy toys (code) to hide their presence. Even then, it is a contest of will and skill.

For someone looking to make their internet footprint as small as possible, start by doing a Google search on your full name. The information available just might surprise you.


13 posted on 10/06/2012 12:53:49 PM PDT by taxcontrol
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 5 | View Replies]

To: flamberge

Agreed.

But for casual use Firefox with private browsing makes me feel a little better about casual observers. Not the Fed Agencies.

For the agencies, “All of your bases belong to us”.


14 posted on 10/06/2012 1:02:25 PM PDT by Texas Fossil (Government, even in its best state is but a necessary evil; in its worst state an intolerable one)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 6 | View Replies]

To: EveningStar

I have listened to Kim Komando occasionally but quite frankly do not think she is really that tech savvy.

I am however a Linux user. Started with that OS in 1994 or 1995. Seldom fire us a Windows machine. But I maintain my wife’s windows computer.


15 posted on 10/06/2012 1:06:03 PM PDT by Texas Fossil (Government, even in its best state is but a necessary evil; in its worst state an intolerable one)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: taxcontrol

I’ve done well.. been on PCs since 1980.. on ‘net’ since 1992 (ftp).. and was on the internet when it was still dial-up (using Netscape)..

Did a check a couple of days ago.. the peoplefinder sites have my name (plus about 60 other people with the same name).. but the listed adress is from more than 15 years ago.

not a single pic..

Of course, I have always been wary of posting any personal info online ;)


16 posted on 10/06/2012 1:15:04 PM PDT by Bikkuri (Hope for Conservative push in the next 2-4 years..........)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 13 | View Replies]

To: E. Pluribus Unum

What if someone listens to packets going to and coming from HMA? They would easily see your traffic just as much if they simply monitored your Internet connection. Wait...what if they simply monitor your Internet connection via your ISP?

Anyone thinking there is any way possible to hide your Internet traffic has no clue how HTTP works.


17 posted on 10/06/2012 1:46:15 PM PDT by CodeToad (Padme: "So this is how liberty dies... with thunderous applause.")
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 4 | View Replies]

To: Calvin Locke

I haven’t heard her in years.......


18 posted on 10/06/2012 1:57:12 PM PDT by basil (Second Amendment Sisters.org)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 8 | View Replies]

To: taxcontrol

I won’t use Google for a search. I use IXQ, they claim to be the world’s most private search engine. Searches all the big ones, but no tracking your IP, and no cookies.

https://www.ixquick.com/


19 posted on 10/06/2012 1:59:13 PM PDT by Dr. Bogus Pachysandra ( Ya can't pick up a turd by the clean end!)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 13 | View Replies]

To: taxcontrol

The information available just might surprise you.

Never though too much about this issue until I went on-line several months ago to look for less expensive auto insurance. Didn’t put in any personal info but up popped a Google pic of my car in my driveway with the question, “Is this the car you want to insure?” along with my name, ZIP code and mileage on my car. Discovered the source was likely the State of Texas as I had just gotten my annual safety inspection and auto license.

I can also find out how much my neighbor’s real estate taxes are and whether they are current. It’s scary what is considered public information, let alone private information.


20 posted on 10/06/2012 2:00:17 PM PDT by Grams A (The Sun will rise in the East in the morning and God is still on his throne.)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 13 | View Replies]

To: EveningStar

you CANNOT surf/browse/email without being monitored. PERIOD.

The illusion of privacy on the internet is, and has been, a perception you can’t be tracked. There are many, many methods used to track people online, and believing someone like Kim Komando can make you “invisible” is a recipe for failure.

GET OVER IT. There is no internet privacy.

Funny thing is, the people who want online privacy the most are the dullards who post their whole like, comings and goings and opinions online.

This goes way, way back to the days the government (yes, ours) intercepted international calls (been happening since the 60s)


21 posted on 10/06/2012 2:04:23 PM PDT by BereanBrain
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: CodeToad
Everything coming from your router is encrypted. They can monitor it all they want, but they won't know what's in it unless they crack 2048-bit encryption. All they will know is that traffic is going to your ISP's server.

The most likely scenario is they are going to see your activity on a website and track your IP address to the VPN. Unless the VPN service provider tells them the IP address they are mapping your traffic to, it's a dead end.

The key is that the VPN provider must be trustworthy.

That's my theory. I am more than happy to be disabused of it.

22 posted on 10/06/2012 2:12:22 PM PDT by E. Pluribus Unum (Government is the religion of the psychopath.)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 17 | View Replies]

To: E. Pluribus Unum

HTTP has two primary pieces of information that is useful: What your IP address is and what the request is to the distance server. At a minimum they can tell what server you’re trying to get to, even if you use a proxy server, that server is sending messages to other servers. As far as encryption: All commercial encryption is a joke. All encryption. It is just plain silly to think that commercial encryption beats military encryption. If that were the case then why would the military have its own encryption? 2048 bit keys? So? Key length means not much. There are military systems that don’t even use keys. What math algorithm are you using? Is it weak? Do you really know? What is its relation to a rather large prime number? I remember reading of “largest prime number found” by universities of lengths the NSA had 30+ years ago. Primes are how encryption is cracked, not brute force against keys, so key length means nothing. Once the NSA has the right prime factored equation to crack an encryption equation they simply put that onto a chip and run it at high speed in large numbers. The military/intel agencies wouldn’t maintain extremely large data collection sytems if all everyone had to do was encrypt using commercial encryption.


23 posted on 10/06/2012 2:30:07 PM PDT by CodeToad (Padme: "So this is how liberty dies... with thunderous applause.")
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 22 | View Replies]

To: EveningStar

Just use Start Page.


24 posted on 10/06/2012 2:55:31 PM PDT by Georgia Girl 2 (The only purpose of a pistol is to fight your way back to the rifle you should never have dropped.)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: CodeToad
So there is no point to using a VPN with my home Internet service?
25 posted on 10/06/2012 3:00:42 PM PDT by E. Pluribus Unum (Government is the religion of the psychopath.)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 23 | View Replies]

To: EveningStar

bfl


26 posted on 10/06/2012 3:14:53 PM PDT by FreedomPoster (Islam delenda est)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: E. Pluribus Unum

Nope. None at all. If you become a target or the data centers want to read your communications, they will. I always assume everything I send over the Internet is being read by someone. There are two rules I live by, that one, and NEVER have ANYTHING even remotely illegal in my house. Nothing, ever.


27 posted on 10/06/2012 3:22:17 PM PDT by CodeToad (Padme: "So this is how liberty dies... with thunderous applause.")
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 25 | View Replies]

To: E. Pluribus Unum
The key is that the VPN provider must be trustworthy.

That is a very big assumption that is very probably wrong.

In any event the endpoints of a VPN connection are easy to track even if the messages remain encrypted. Some of those endpoints will certainly become infested with government-developed keyloggers and other malware that will attempt to install on your PC.

If "they" think it may be worthwhile, "they" can and will track you down to physical location. The Fusion centers are very good at sifting through fields of haystacks to find a needle.

Post accordingly.

Of course they will get about 174 plausible matches on a good search and the results may be somewhat ambiguous for some posters. What with overtime limits and all, it may take several days for anyone to show up at your door.

In fact, the search for you may never get run because there are too many requests ahead of yours.

28 posted on 10/06/2012 4:05:11 PM PDT by flamberge (What next?)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 22 | View Replies]

To: Truth29
If Obama gets a second term, we can assume that everything ever posted or written will become available and subject to action

This would be quite likely. However if Obama got another term, the Government would be overwhelmed by unsolvable economic and military crisis that would make Internet posting histories mostly irrelevant in very short order.

The effective surveillence infrastructure that monitors the Internet would deteriorate rapidly when staffers start worrying about their own relatives in the food lines.

In the mean time it is wise to remain civil and legal in all actions.

29 posted on 10/06/2012 5:33:45 PM PDT by flamberge (What next?)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 10 | View Replies]

Disclaimer: Opinions posted on Free Republic are those of the individual posters and do not necessarily represent the opinion of Free Republic or its management. All materials posted herein are protected by copyright law and the exemption for fair use of copyrighted works.

Free Republic
Browse · Search
General/Chat
Topics · Post Article

FreeRepublic, LLC, PO BOX 9771, FRESNO, CA 93794
FreeRepublic.com is powered by software copyright 2000-2008 John Robinson