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Ancient tomb found at 'Sweden's Stonehenge'
The Local (Sweden) ^ | October 15, 2012 | Rebecca Martin

Posted on 10/17/2012 3:41:11 PM PDT by SunkenCiv

Swedish archaeologists have unearthed what is presumed to be a dolmen, or a portal tomb, that is believed to be over 5,000 years old near the megalithic monument Ale's stones in southern Sweden...

Despite a few days of rain, the archaeologists have managed to uncover enough of the site to see that what they have found is like to be a dolmen, a type of megalithic tomb, most often consisting of three or more upright stones supporting a large flat horizontal capstone...

According to reports, the archaeologists have found what they believe is an imprint of the tomb, which must have consisted of very heavy rocks as the impression was solid...

The archaeologists have also found what they believe to be the wall imprints...

While digging up the barrow, the archaeologists also found a flint scraper tool...

However, despite the importance of the find, this was just a preliminary dig and the shaft is to be filled up on Monday.

According to the experts, a full excavation would be necessary in order to get a full view of what is buried on the site.

And a new dig could be on the cards as the find to some extent rewrites the history of the place, according to Wallbom...

The Ale's Stones (Ales stenar) is a megalithic monument sometimes referred to as "Sweden's Stonehenge" and located about 10 kilometres southeast of Ystad in Skåne overlooking the sea in southern Sweden.

The site consists of 59 large sandstone boulders weighing about 1.8-tonnes each and arranged in the shape of a 67-metre long ship.

According to Scanian folklore, a legendary king named King Ale lies buried there.

(Excerpt) Read more at thelocal.se ...


TOPICS: History; Science; Travel
KEYWORDS: archaeoastronomy; godsgravesglyphs; megaliths; stonehenge; sweden
Ancient tomb found at Swedens Stonehenge
Alas, one we can't post, but I wish we could use it:
1 posted on 10/17/2012 3:41:17 PM PDT by SunkenCiv
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To: StayAt HomeMother; Ernest_at_the_Beach; decimon; 1010RD; 21twelve; 24Karet; 2ndDivisionVet; ...

 GGG managers are SunkenCiv, StayAt HomeMother & Ernest_at_the_Beach
My apologies, this may be an older version of the ping list!

To all -- please ping me to other topics which are appropriate for the GGG list.


2 posted on 10/17/2012 3:44:43 PM PDT by SunkenCiv (https://secure.freerepublic.com/donate/)
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To: SunkenCiv

Dolmens are also found in Ireland.


3 posted on 10/17/2012 3:45:01 PM PDT by popdonnelly (The first priority is get Obama out of the White House.)
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To: SunkenCiv
According to Scanian folklore, a legendary king named King Ale lies buried there.

King Liquor is on the other side.

4 posted on 10/17/2012 3:57:32 PM PDT by DannyTN
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To: SunkenCiv
found what they believe is an imprint of the tomb, which must have consisted of very heavy rocks as the impression was solid...

So...the actual dolmen stones themselves are not present?

Talk about tomb robbing!

5 posted on 10/17/2012 4:02:01 PM PDT by BenLurkin (This is not a statement of fact. It is either opinion or satire; or both)
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To: popdonnelly

The Dolman Elaan of Troyius

6 posted on 10/17/2012 4:02:13 PM PDT by eCSMaster (Indep. Payment Advisory Board = "Death Panels")
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To: SunkenCiv
Re: That other link. They have lost their ever lovings if they think those images are Art.


7 posted on 10/17/2012 4:20:48 PM PDT by bigheadfred
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To: SunkenCiv

We had these in college. You drank an ale and then ran ten times around the rock. Then, you went to the next rock and did the same thing. Whoever got to the end and could still stand, without throwing up, was crowned KING ALE. See, some Scandinavian traditions are still going. It seems to be all the traditions involving drinking, though.


8 posted on 10/17/2012 4:21:49 PM PDT by blueunicorn6 ("A crack shot and a good dancer")
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To: DannyTN

Both laid on funeral beers.


9 posted on 10/17/2012 4:28:53 PM PDT by Adder (No Mo BO)
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To: bigheadfred

http://3.bp.blogspot.com/-AGoKklxNbSg/T-6kQciVr4I/AAAAAAAAGp8/ii1UZadk9vU/s1600/gobeklitepe_nov08_2.jpg A tad older but the same concept, the large standing stone is the shaft or root of the clan/tribe/family and the stone aross the top is the glans ~ without which you don’t get a clan. The old timers thought that all genes passed through the male member and that women served only as vessels. BTW, Gobekli Tepe tells us this ‘ligion was in use up to 12,000 years ago, and Stone Henge tells us it was still in use 3900 years ago ~ which is pretty good for that sort of thing,


10 posted on 10/17/2012 4:35:43 PM PDT by muawiyah
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To: blueunicorn6
in college... Scandinavian traditions... all involving drinking, though.

Invite some chicks next time...

11 posted on 10/17/2012 4:38:39 PM PDT by bigheadfred
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To: muawiyah
which is pretty good for that sort of thing

Understating it a bit. If they could get it up and keep it up for that long, amazingly, astoundingly, outstanding is more like it.

If you ever decide to visit Gobekli Tepe don't be surprised to find me hiding in your suitcase when you get there.

12 posted on 10/17/2012 4:47:57 PM PDT by bigheadfred
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To: bigheadfred

http://elodietfr4.wikispaces.com/file/view/menhir.jpg/172428453/menhir.jpg now this is a big one from Carnac. As i mentioned the other day one of my ancestors OWNED THE WHOLE SITE and found plenty of paying customers who wanted to see it way back in the Middle Ages. This is also part of the Brocéliande (King Arthur was here too) ~ a truly ancient religious pilgrimage route begins here and ends up at Santiago de Compostela in Spain. Merlin’s tomb is supposedly there in Brittany and St. James bones are in Compostela. The founding date for the Borceliande is roughly 570 AD, with the repopulation of Brittany from Great Britain, and the founding date for Compestela is about 1000 or so ~ but that has to do with the founding of a Cathedral there. The pilgrimage trail is far, far, far older and both areas are regularly targeted for archaeological digs. The tradition probably goes back thousands of years.


13 posted on 10/17/2012 4:48:02 PM PDT by muawiyah
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To: muawiyah

Thanks for the info. Standing stones, and their history fascinate me.


14 posted on 10/17/2012 4:51:45 PM PDT by bigheadfred
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To: SunkenCiv

In one breath they claim the tomb could be 5000 years old, then they just drop the ramifications of that and talk about something else.

That’s 3000BC!!! If their estimate is correct that would make it a tomb from the time frame generally considered the time when the great pyramids were constructed.

Does anyone else have some interest as to what size and sophistication of civilization would have the tools and manpower to move all these stones around, possibly to mark the grave of a king or other important person?

The history we normally teach doesn’t really line up with that.


15 posted on 10/17/2012 5:52:47 PM PDT by Advil000
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To: bigheadfred

How do you think I met my wife? She was running the wrong way around a rock and we crashed into each other. I discovered it was fun bumping into girls. That’s how I invented that famous dance in the 70s, The Bump.


16 posted on 10/17/2012 5:53:44 PM PDT by blueunicorn6 ("A crack shot and a good dancer")
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To: blueunicorn6

WOW! You invented the Bump? And heres I thought you was just a party crasher.


17 posted on 10/17/2012 5:57:52 PM PDT by bigheadfred
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To: bigheadfred

Nope. You’d be surprised at how many parties I get invited to. I got invited to the Democrat party. The girls looked like guys and they just kept playing Muskrat Love over and over. I thought that I would entertain them with my performance art piece, MONET MEETS JERRY LEWIS, but they were all stoned and went out to buy some Doritos, but, of course, none of them knew where the store was so they went to the corner to watch the traffic light change colors. I made $127 betting with them.
“I’ll bet you five bucks it changes color to green.”
“No way , Dude! I think it’s gonna be purple this time.”


18 posted on 10/17/2012 7:08:40 PM PDT by blueunicorn6 ("A crack shot and a good dancer")
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To: SunkenCiv; mikrofon; Charles Henrickson; WesternCulture
According to Scanian folklore, a legendary king named King Ale lies buried there.

Ich bin ein BeerLiner.

19 posted on 10/17/2012 8:26:33 PM PDT by martin_fierro (Ich bin ein BierLiner)
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To: SunkenCiv

The High Priestesses of the Temple - a 3,000 year old tradition - hoist one to King Ale.

20 posted on 10/18/2012 11:56:20 AM PDT by colorado tanker
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To: Advil000

There’s no “history we normally teach” which doesn’t by now include the info that many, possibly most, megalithic structures in Europe and elsewhere are older than the Giza pyramids.

The Great Pyramid at Giza was built about 2550 BC, the other two large ones at Giza were constructed by the next two generations of the same dynasty. Sweden’s megaliths shown above are part of an older tradition.

The earliest megalithic structures on Malta were built 7000 years ago. The Gobekli Tepe site in Turkey is around 13000 years old. Megalithic sites may be from a single worldwide culture with roots in the last ice age.

http://www.freerepublic.com/tag/gobeklitepe/index


21 posted on 10/18/2012 4:48:39 PM PDT by SunkenCiv (https://secure.freerepublic.com/donate/)
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