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IBM prepares to demo 125TB MONSTER tape
The Register ^ | 19th October 2012 12:29 GMT | Chris Mellor

Posted on 10/19/2012 1:15:11 PM PDT by Ernest_at_the_Beach

Huge LTO-6 hardness is shingled

IP Expo: Tape Summit IBM has revealed it is preparing a technology demonstration of a 125TB tape, and has revealed that LTO-6 tapes use shingling, with overlapped data tracks.

In January 2010, IBM demonstrated a tape with 35TB of raw capacity. Apply LTO-6's 2.5:1 compression ratio to that and you get 87.5TB. This contrasted with the then-current LTO-5 tape's raw capacity of 1.5TB.

The LTO consortium has a roadmap of two more formats: LTO-7 with 6.48TB raw capacity, and LTO-8 with 12.8TB. Assuming that the upcoming LTO format capacity doubling, IBM's 35TB tape, created with the help of Fujifilm, would fit between a conceivable LTO-9 with around $25TB and an LTO-10 with 50TB.

At the time we said such a tape would take three days to fill at LTO-5 speeds. This does not matter as it is restore speed that is vital, and a fast streaming drive would get to the start point of a file needing restoration in seconds.

At the Tape Summit, Paul Scheuer, tape brand management programme director in Big Blue's Storage Systems Division, said IBM was developing a 125TB tape – 3.6 times more capacious than the 35TB tape. It is able to do this because the physical size of a bit on tape is many times larger than the size of a bit on disk, and can be shrunk without having to go to the difficult and expensive bit-patterned media and energy-assisted recording techniques facing disk drive manufacturers in their quest to increase areal density.

A tape read/write head doesn't have to move anything like as much as a disk head, which snakes in and out across a disk platter's surface, hunting for the destination data track and then following it. Scheuer said that a tape read:write head also read from narrower tracks than it wrote, and write tracks were overlapped, shingled like roofing tiles, so more of them could be put down along a tape's surface.

Roof shingles

Write tracks on the 125TB tape are overlapped, like shingles on a roof.

By increasing the sensitivity and bit granularity of the read:write heads and shrinking the physical size of the bits, to a 100Gbits/in 2 areal density, a 125TB capacity tape using a development of today's barium ferrite recording media technology, should be attainable. This could theoretically enable an LTO-11 format with 100TB raw capacity and 250TB compressed capacity.

Scheuer pointed out that tape cartridge capacity needed to develop so as to maintain a consistent advantage over 3.5-inch disk drive capacity. We have 4TB disks today and LTO-6 tapes with 6.25TB compressed capacity. As long as successive tape formats sustain the capacity advantage over disk then tape's cost/GB advantages over disk should be sustained as well.

There is a prospect here of the LTFS file:folder tape interface combining with a 100TB or more tape cartridges to provide a highly attractive and dense storage medium for businesses needing access to lots of large files, such as high-definition videos and other large data sets that individuals need to work on. With LTFS and such tape cartridge capacities, the notion that tape could be an individual or small workgroup's backup medium could perhaps be re-evaluated. ®


TOPICS: Business/Economy; Computers/Internet
KEYWORDS: hitech

1 posted on 10/19/2012 1:15:15 PM PDT by Ernest_at_the_Beach
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To: ShadowAce
Here we go....

Store everything ....

2 posted on 10/19/2012 1:16:50 PM PDT by Ernest_at_the_Beach ((The Global Warming Hoax was a Criminal Act....where is Al Gore?))
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To: Ernest_at_the_Beach
In ten years it'll be the size of the on/off button.

First 1gb hard drive next to what replaced it.

Photobucket

3 posted on 10/19/2012 1:26:46 PM PDT by SkyDancer (Live your life in such a way that the Westboro church shows up at your funeral)
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To: Ernest_at_the_Beach

They've replaced the 2400 9-track tape drives already? Up to 140MB capacity. Not even a million times more capacity yet.

4 posted on 10/19/2012 1:36:14 PM PDT by WilliamofCarmichael (If modern America's Man on Horseback is out there, Get on the damn horse already!)
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To: All
Going to Wikipedia:

Linear Tape-Open---LTO

*****************************EXCERPTS*******************************************

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Jump to: navigation, search
LTO-2 cartridge

Linear Tape-Open (or LTO) is a magnetic tape data storage technology originally developed in the late 1990s as an open standards alternative to the proprietary magnetic tape formats that were available at the time. Hewlett-Packard, IBM and Seagate initiated the LTO Consortium, which directs development and manages licensing and certification of media and mechanism manufacturers. Seagate's tape division was spun-off as Certance and is now part of Quantum Corp.

The standard form-factor of LTO technology goes by the name Ultrium, the original version of which was released in 2000 and could hold 100 GB of data in a cartridge. A version released in 2010 can hold 1.5 TB in a cartridge of the same size.

Upon introduction, LTO Ultrium rapidly defined the super tape market segment and has consistently been the best-selling super tape format.[1][2] LTO is widely used with small and large computer systems, especially for backup.

5 posted on 10/19/2012 1:43:43 PM PDT by Ernest_at_the_Beach ((The Global Warming Hoax was a Criminal Act....where is Al Gore?))
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To: WilliamofCarmichael

I remmeber all of that /,,,,”stuff”.


6 posted on 10/19/2012 1:46:14 PM PDT by Ernest_at_the_Beach ((The Global Warming Hoax was a Criminal Act....where is Al Gore?))
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To: All

So uh how many songs will fit on it?


7 posted on 10/19/2012 1:52:57 PM PDT by j_k_l
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To: Ernest_at_the_Beach

Tape backup has a bad “track record”. It seems like half the time data needs to be restored from tape it can’t be done.


8 posted on 10/19/2012 1:59:30 PM PDT by Reeses
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To: Reeses

” It seems like half the time data needs to be restored from tape it can’t be done.”

We always made duplex backups ‘just in case’. I also made separate backups of the user volumes which were the ones that got hosed the most by our retard programmers. :)


9 posted on 10/19/2012 2:13:08 PM PDT by dljordan (Voltaire: "To find out who rules over you, simply find out who you are not allowed to criticize.")
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To: Ernest_at_the_Beach

When I was in business school, we had a huge IBM installation upon which we loaded the software with punch cards


10 posted on 10/19/2012 2:15:57 PM PDT by Stayfree (Find out how Obama is destroying America at White House Commie.com!!)
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To: Ernest_at_the_Beach
I cannot believe this. Serious cognitive dissonance reading this in 2012! Tape!? As in tape drives!? A tape drive is one hell of a complex close spec-ed non cheap thing! In fact high quality tape drives for Pro Audio were underwritten by sales of the high tech monster tape drives used by industry and the military. There weren't enough buyers of audio drives to support the level of R&D that produced the best drives. Can't believe anyone wants to use them for storage.
11 posted on 10/19/2012 2:31:13 PM PDT by TalBlack (Evil doesn't have a day job.)
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To: Ernest_at_the_Beach

Well 27TB is needed to theoretically backup a human mind, so can we backup our brains now?


12 posted on 10/19/2012 2:32:01 PM PDT by GraceG
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To: j_k_l
Robert Klein's The Final Record Offer (Side 1, cut 1)
13 posted on 10/19/2012 3:07:26 PM PDT by Erasmus (Zwischen des Teufels und des tiefen, blauen Meers)
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To: TalBlack
I cannot believe this. Serious cognitive dissonance reading this in 2012! Tape!? As in tape drives!? A tape drive is one hell of a complex close spec-ed non cheap thing! In fact high quality tape drives for Pro Audio were underwritten by sales of the high tech monster tape drives used by industry and the military. There weren't enough buyers of audio drives to support the level of R&D that produced the best drives. Can't believe anyone wants to use them for storage.

Did you miss the "portable 125TB" part?

14 posted on 10/19/2012 3:33:25 PM PDT by Talisker (One who commands, must obey.)
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To: GraceG
Well 27TB is needed to theoretically backup a human mind, so can we backup our brains now?

That study was done on liberals.

15 posted on 10/19/2012 3:34:27 PM PDT by Talisker (One who commands, must obey.)
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To: Ernest_at_the_Beach

Any IT Director using tape to back up mission critical files needs to be fired.


16 posted on 10/19/2012 3:42:43 PM PDT by Lurker (Violence is rarely the answer. But when it is it is the only answer.)
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To: Ernest_at_the_Beach

...a... er... gee.... HUH? Wait, What?


17 posted on 10/19/2012 3:44:48 PM PDT by carlo3b (Less Government, more Fiber..)
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To: Talisker

Why on earth you you need to carry that much data around with you? Back it up to a VM server with a SAN. Pull down whatever of it you need on demand.

Done.


18 posted on 10/19/2012 3:48:59 PM PDT by Lurker (Violence is rarely the answer. But when it is it is the only answer.)
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To: Talisker

“Did you miss the “portable 125TB” part? “

If it’s rolling tape it has to do it the way tape drives roll tape, as far as I know. That requires complexity. Tape drives at the height of their use were amazingly complex and reliable. But start, stop, FF, rewind, search beats hell out of the mech as well as grinds down the tape path. I’m abosolutely stunned that they have a present day use.


19 posted on 10/19/2012 4:11:51 PM PDT by TalBlack (Evil doesn't have a day job.)
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To: Ernest_at_the_Beach

Inside IBM, as well as in other computer technology firms, this has been a long-running competition between magnetic tape technology and hard disk technology. I can’t remember how many conferences and seminars where one IBM presenter offered their latest magnetic tape technology that would leap frog disk drive capacities, only to be followed soon thereafter at another conference, with another IBMer demonstrating how THEIR latest disk technology would leap frog other storage mediums.

Some songs are timeless.


20 posted on 10/19/2012 4:32:02 PM PDT by Wuli
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To: TalBlack
I’m abosolutely stunned that they have a present day use.

I've worked in data centers where it's necessary to have archival storage. For example, someone needs to retrieve a file they had on their workstation back in January of last year (and deleted it in February, so it's not on more current backup copies).

Buying tapes for this purpose is still cheaper than buying hard drives for every copy you need.

21 posted on 10/19/2012 4:33:10 PM PDT by Cementjungle
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To: Stayfree

Came from the system 3X world. 1600/6250 tape drives. We were ecstatic when cartridges came out. Of course the firmware wasn’t compatible and there were no PTF’s to fix it.


22 posted on 10/19/2012 5:12:19 PM PDT by EQAndyBuzz
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To: SkyDancer

That’s a IBM 3380-J spindle/HDA , 1.26gb ... a string of 2 AJ’s and 14 BJ’s would be about $750,000.00 plus the 3880 controller...


23 posted on 10/19/2012 5:23:52 PM PDT by Neidermeyer
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To: Talisker

Did you miss the “portable 125TB” part?
****************************************
portability is the key to making “CTAM”* work..

*CTAM = “Chevy Truck Access Method” to be used in case of hurricane , fire , flood or any other disaster.


24 posted on 10/19/2012 5:27:23 PM PDT by Neidermeyer
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To: Lurker
Companies can have requirements for off-site storage of data that is not or cannot be kept on-line. My company does. Also virtual tape technology has its drawbacks regarding cost for some companies. The company I work for already has about 70 TB of data that needs to be backed up and shipped off-site regularly.
25 posted on 10/19/2012 5:34:14 PM PDT by ColdSteelTalon (Light is fading to shadow, and casting its shroud over all we have known...)
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To: ColdSteelTalon

What do you mean by “online”? Mission critical data is a heck of a lot more secure in a SAS certified data center than it is on a hunk of tape in the back seat of someone’s car.


26 posted on 10/19/2012 5:47:35 PM PDT by Lurker (Violence is rarely the answer. But when it is it is the only answer.)
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To: Neidermeyer

Ya, and now you can’t buy a 1G chip. Too small. Smallest is now 4G at 9 dollars or so.


27 posted on 10/19/2012 6:25:24 PM PDT by SkyDancer (Live your life in such a way that the Westboro church shows up at your funeral)
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To: SkyDancer

Aww yes. An old IBM 3380 disk drive. I’ve replaced my share of them over the years.


28 posted on 10/19/2012 8:19:00 PM PDT by rawhide
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To: Lurker
Virtual tape in the same data center is what I am referring to when I say on-line. We have a requirement that backups have to be kept at a separate physical location. We have a professional off-site storage company that handles our media that is fully certified for handling and storing tape and other media. So its not really as you say an option that we keep our backups in the back of someones car.

Of course you can backup your data to virtual tape in another data center but that is a huge expense that some companies do not want to get into.

29 posted on 10/20/2012 12:46:09 PM PDT by ColdSteelTalon (Light is fading to shadow, and casting its shroud over all we have known...)
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To: ColdSteelTalon

Maybe. Colo space is so cheap now that putting. VM server and a SAN in costs very little these days. It’s not like you have to build your own data center or anything these days.


30 posted on 10/20/2012 1:17:54 PM PDT by Lurker (Violence is rarely the answer. But when it is it is the only answer.)
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