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How "prepped" are you for a disaster? (vanity)
Me!

Posted on 11/01/2012 10:46:33 AM PDT by Joseph Harrolds

Just how prepared should you be to ride out a disaster, man-made or otherwise? For purposes of this thread, we'll define the various levels of "prepping" as follows, mostly dependent on how long you can "ride it out" before needing to leave your home or receive aid from the authorities:

Level 0: Nothin'. Your emergency supplies consist of half a box of Cheerios and a cigarette lighter. In case of disaster, you'll be first in line for some government-issue MREs and a seat at a football stadium.

Level 1: While you don't keep things at home with disasters in mind, you at least could live on the supplies in your cupboard & refrigerator (assume the electricity is the first thing to go, though) for a few days to a week. If the tap water stops flowing you're in trouble, though.

Level 2: You've thought about prepping to the extent that you have actually bought a fair amount of supplies with just that in mind. You have enough food and stored water to last a month, and you have at least the level of supplies suggested by FEMA at http://www.ready.gov/basic-disaster-supplies-kit. You routinely keep a survival kit in your vehicle...just in case.

Level 3: Serious prepping. Forget being prepared for the sorts of disasters that have struck this country in the past, you're prepared for worse, more hypothetical ones; nuclear terrorism, bio-terrorism, hyper-inflation, etc. Instead of a savings account or CDs, you have gold and silver. You have enough food and supplies to last a year...at least.

Level 4: It's not just a hobby, it's a lifestyle. You're ready for the End Times, full-blown nuclear war, a zombie apocalypse, the complete collapse of society, etc. You have the supplies, land, and skills to make it on your own (or with the help of your friends/family/survival group) for the rest of your life. You either live on a survival retreat already or plan to go there when TEOTWAWKI (The End Of The World As We Know It) strikes.

So the question is, which category do you most closely fit, and do you aspire to a higher (or lower) category?

I'm around level 2 myself, and would like to get to about 2.5 or so.


TOPICS: Food; Society
KEYWORDS: prepping
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1 posted on 11/01/2012 10:46:33 AM PDT by Joseph Harrolds
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To: Joseph Harrolds

I’m probably a 1.5.

The next purchase will be a whole house generator on auto stand-by.


2 posted on 11/01/2012 10:50:19 AM PDT by TheRhinelander
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To: Joseph Harrolds
1.5. Lots of food but only a couple gallons of water. I also purchased a small generator and will soon do some wiring on my furnace so I can power its blower from the generator in an emergency. In a real emergency I could jerry rig it in about 5 minutes right now.
3 posted on 11/01/2012 10:57:03 AM PDT by KarlInOhio (Big Bird is a brood parasite: laid in our nest 43 years ago and we are still feeding him.)
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To: Joseph Harrolds

I am at 2 with the goal of getting to 2.5 or so. Eventually, I’d like to store food, water and medical supplies for 4 months or so.

I think that’s a financially prudent, life-style compatible, and psychologically healthy level at which to prep.


4 posted on 11/01/2012 10:57:17 AM PDT by altsehastiin
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To: Joseph Harrolds

I guess I am somewhere between 2 and 3. I keep thinking I am going to stock up on long lasting food but have only got to the point of a few bags of rice and a few cans of spam.

I could make it about indefinitely in my rural location except for food. I guess I will add a few more food items each month.


5 posted on 11/01/2012 11:00:13 AM PDT by yarddog
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To: Joseph Harrolds

I am at 2 with the goal of getting to 2.5 or so. Eventually, I’d like to store food, water and medical supplies for 4 months or so.

I think that’s a financially prudent, life-style compatible, and psychologically healthy level at which to prep.


6 posted on 11/01/2012 11:00:24 AM PDT by altsehastiin
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To: Joseph Harrolds

I guess I am somewhere between 2 and 3. I keep thinking I am going to stock up on long lasting food but have only got to the point of a few bags of rice and a few cans of spam.

I could make it about indefinitely in my rural location except for food. I guess I will add a few more food items each month.


7 posted on 11/01/2012 11:02:45 AM PDT by yarddog
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To: TheRhinelander
The next purchase will be a whole house generator on auto stand-by.

Check with Bill O'Reilly. His didn't work.

Seriously. Our lectric and Gas utility used to offer those, and they quit. I think too many of them failed. I have a small generator, but it's not hooked up. I've used it once, and it was most impractical. It has to reside outdoors with a cord coming in the house. In an emergency, I couldn't close the outddor door where the cable lcame in. Therefore, fumes from the generator flowed into the house. Not pleasant and very dangerous.

Maybe after Romney is President, he will publish outlines for all of us as to what we need. Mormons are experts on disaster prep. It is part of their faith. Seriously.

8 posted on 11/01/2012 11:04:52 AM PDT by afraidfortherepublic
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To: Joseph Harrolds

Thanks


9 posted on 11/01/2012 11:06:32 AM PDT by zeaal
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To: Joseph Harrolds

I’m usually at 2.5, but during a prolonged period of unemployment my teenage son ate his way through most of my food supplies. I’m back working now but at a much reduced pay so it’s hard to restock. Generally, I have weapons I know how to use, have considered home security carefully, have worked out contingency plans, have escape routes and fallback positions established, know where I can go if things get bad here, have a go-bag for personal, car, and horse use, have stocks of medications, keep extra gas and firewood around, and am in good enough shape to get where I need to go on foot or ride hundreds of miles on horseback if necessary. I have a place to shelter a dozen miles from my house, and if the entire Eastern seaboard is ruined, I have a place in the countryside of the Midwest I can go to. Am hoping that before that happens I can sell this suburban house and move to a few acres in the Virginia Piedmont.


10 posted on 11/01/2012 11:07:14 AM PDT by ottbmare (The OTTB Mare)
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To: Joseph Harrolds

I’m a 3, which puts me into 4. People who are comfortable in staying alive a year, are part of whatever the new situation is after the confusion, and chaos, and dying off, had shaken out.


11 posted on 11/01/2012 11:09:18 AM PDT by ansel12 (Vote, but don't pretend.)
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To: Joseph Harrolds

In order to find out, I plan to do a full practice later this year. It will last maybe four days or so to see where the weak spots are particularly with respect to generator usage, water supplies, and cooking.

Just to make it more realistic, I wonder if I should spring it on the family unexpectedly.


12 posted on 11/01/2012 11:10:10 AM PDT by Rio (Tempis Fugit.)
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To: Joseph Harrolds
bio-terrorism, hyper-inflation,

Bio-terrorism. The anthrax attacks. It happened here in the US.

Hyper-inflation.... has happened several times before the civil war. You know. That civil war that killed a noticable percentage of the US?

Perhaps you should read a little history about what things HAVE happened to the country, that maybe happened before you were born.

/johnny

13 posted on 11/01/2012 11:10:36 AM PDT by JRandomFreeper (Gone Galt)
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To: yarddog
Some of the big box "clubs" offer "kits" of dehydrated food stuffs for this purpose. You really have to institute a rotation plan so that 1) you know how to prepare it and 2) you don't wind up with a shelf of meals that you don't like, or ingredients that are missing their companion ingredients that will make a decent meal.

It's more complicated than just acquiring a few foodstuffs each week.

14 posted on 11/01/2012 11:11:32 AM PDT by afraidfortherepublic
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To: afraidfortherepublic

They need to be protected just like any other generator.

My current one sits in my shed and I run a 220 capable line from the shed to my house. It’s only 2400 watts but it’s enough to run my sump pump, fridge and a cellphone charger.

The reason I want one of the big ones is so I can run it off propane like my heat and hot water. That way I avoid the gas lines like you are seeing now in NY and NJ.

I would build a shelter over it so that it would be protected from the elements. That’s probably why his failed.


15 posted on 11/01/2012 11:12:40 AM PDT by TheRhinelander
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To: KarlInOhio
I also purchased a small generator and will soon do some wiring on my furnace so I can power its blower from the generator in an emergency. In a real emergency I could jerry rig it in about 5 minutes right now.

If you are skilled enough to handle emergency wiring, why not feed your main power panel and keep the main off. Then you can selectively use anything in the house.

I did this during hurricane Ike and the 5 days without power on a 5.5kW generator. We did not run the A/C, Oven or stove. But then we could flip on the lights when we needed them, watch TV, use the ceiling fans, etc.

16 posted on 11/01/2012 11:14:08 AM PDT by thackney (life is fragile, handle with prayer)
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To: Joseph Harrolds
Things I've gathered:

1. It's better to have a well-stocked freezer and lots of canned goods always in rotation ALL the time. Like fitness, it's a lifestyle, not a "diet."

2. Storing water is easy so do it. A capful of bleach is all you need here and there. Fill all bathtubs the second power goes out, or before.

3. Having a small, quiet (vented) generator in the house and plenty of clean fuel is more important than a big whole-house genset blazing away in the dead of night, attracting attention. Do you really need all that power?

4. Nothing compares to wool for clothes, and wool and down for blankets. Layers: a lifestyle choice.

5. A wood stove in the basement or ground floor is a much better investment than a generator.

6. Guns need ammo. Lots of it. Buy it, keep it, store it.
17 posted on 11/01/2012 11:14:34 AM PDT by golux
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To: Joseph Harrolds

2.5 given that it’s hard to supply more than 6 months of water at home.

Those with 2nd location, out of town, consider how difficult it will be to get there, presuming no warning.


18 posted on 11/01/2012 11:14:40 AM PDT by G Larry (Which of Obama's policies do you think I'd support if he were white?)
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To: yarddog

When I said “big box stores” I meant Costco and Sam’s Club. You can access their emergency stock food supply kits on-line.


19 posted on 11/01/2012 11:15:10 AM PDT by afraidfortherepublic
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To: Joseph Harrolds

Level 2+
I’d have to move to get to Level 3, but I’m working on it.


20 posted on 11/01/2012 11:16:06 AM PDT by SJSAMPLE
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To: Joseph Harrolds
There are tablets/pill that can be put into contaminated water and make it drinkable. How do those work out?

I bought some from an Army Surplus store once, gave them to my son in law. How do those work out?

21 posted on 11/01/2012 11:17:17 AM PDT by annieokie
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To: golux
Fill all bathtubs the second power goes out, or before.

May I suggest adding to that plan? All "normal" bathtug drain seals leak small amounts. They are good for hours, not normally days.

And if you need it to be your drinking supply, you may wish it was not open to the cat/dog/kids etc.

Several companies make inexpensive tub "bags" to keep your water in the tub and keep it clean.

http://www.aquapodkit.com/order

http://www.amazon.com/waterBOB-Emergency-Drinking-Water-Storage/dp/B001AXLUX2

http://www.mywatersafe.com/cart.shtml

22 posted on 11/01/2012 11:23:03 AM PDT by thackney (life is fragile, handle with prayer)
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To: Joseph Harrolds

Not near as prepped as I want to be, better than most.

I’m working on building my bug out shelters (two bug out locations) using compressed earth blocks (building the CEB machine this winter). Bug out #1 is 1 hr drive away, #2 is 3 hrs away.

Already have some food (1 weeks worth - 2 if rationed) and adding more weekly, water filtration and purification, guns, ammo, 100 lbs of propane, enough camping gear for my whole family and 24 ft trailer if needed.

Still need:
a propane space heater
a 7kw portable generator (multi fuel)
finish out food for family of 5 for 1 year
ethanol still
more guns and ammo (never have enough)
1 year of seeds (x2 - one for each location)
solar powered water well and septic system at bug out location #2
equipment to build a high tunnel green house at each location

By this time next year - should be 100% at home (bug in) and bug out #1. Might still need some work at bug out #2. Might need some more food, but essentially done.


23 posted on 11/01/2012 11:29:18 AM PDT by taxcontrol
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To: Joseph Harrolds

I love this topic. When I bought 20 acres south of Kansas City, and was having a water well drilled, the drillers tapped into a natural gas reservoir.

I have two generators at my home. I have one in the garage which powers the house, which is used when we lose power due to winter storms, and I have another in my outbuilding which can power every structure I ow, plus I have consider extra to help people I like.

We have about three years worth of food, canned and frozen, with a five acre spot already prepped for a garden. The most important item I have is a celltion of 5 M-4’s with 20K rounds of ammunition.

So what am I. I think I’m about a 9.5!!!!


24 posted on 11/01/2012 11:29:27 AM PDT by cgchief
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To: Joseph Harrolds

I love this topic. When I bought 20 acres south of Kansas City, and was having a water well drilled, the drillers tapped into a natural gas reservoir.

I have two generators at my home. I have one in the garage which powers the house, which is used when we lose power due to winter storms, and I have another in my outbuilding which can power every structure I ow, plus I have consider extra to help people I like.

We have about three years worth of food, canned and frozen, with a five acre spot already prepped for a garden. The most important item I have is a celltion of 5 M-4’s with 20K rounds of ammunition.

So what am I. I think I’m about a 9.5!!!!


25 posted on 11/01/2012 11:30:00 AM PDT by cgchief
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To: Joseph Harrolds

I’m probably a 1.5 would like to be a 2.5.


26 posted on 11/01/2012 11:38:04 AM PDT by Qwackertoo (Romney/Ryan 2012 The Future of Our Children and Their Children are at stake.)
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To: Joseph Harrolds

I have a generator but have no plans to use it other than a short time during power outages.

Living in the woods I would simply go back to what my parents did when they were young. You cook with wood. You get your water from a well or spring.

I am too old to re-learn how to farm with a horse or mule. I will just have to depend on what I can grow in a garden or have saved for food. I do have a lot of fruit and pecan trees so that would help during the Summer and even during the Winter with a couple of things.

I am lucky that water is always available. I have camped with my Father and Brothers while hunting. We did live off the land for a week or so. Of course Daddy always brought a jar of grease and a frying pan.

The main problem would be heat in the Summer. This brick house was not built for living without AC. It has double paned windows and low ceilings.

I remember growing up in an old frame house with large windows and screens. It had high ceilings. It was perfectly comfortable in the Summer with the windows open.


27 posted on 11/01/2012 11:38:41 AM PDT by yarddog
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To: yarddog
Freeze dried food from http://MountainHouse.com is convenient, reasonably priced and has a 25 year shelf life. A limited selection of #10 cans are also available at some of the large sports/camping outlets.
28 posted on 11/01/2012 11:49:08 AM PDT by immadashell
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To: Joseph Harrolds
so the noob wants to know what weve got squirreled away?

not a chance -

most of us have collections of weapons lost in unfortunate incidents....just last week I retold the story of losing mine in an asbestos factory fire....many others lost theirs in similar accidents, be it sudden opening chasms that suddenly close without leaving a trace, or the fellow who lost everything - including his prep goods to the unfortunate flood....he lived in the city I think - somewhere on the 15th floor

29 posted on 11/01/2012 11:50:08 AM PDT by Revelation 911 ("The whole contrivance imploded last night ..in in one great rancid...public fart")
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To: Joseph Harrolds

A solid 3 - with a remote off-grid location to retreat to should I need to evacuate from my primary residence. Supplies and equipment at the ready at both sites.


30 posted on 11/01/2012 11:51:15 AM PDT by RobertClark (Inside every "older" person is a younger person wondering what the hell happened?)
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*


31 posted on 11/01/2012 11:51:57 AM PDT by PMAS (All that is necessary for the triumph of evil is that good men do nothing)
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To: immadashell

I have tried their freeze dried bags where you just add boiling water. This was while camping.

It was extremely tasty, better than most meals prepared the regular way. Of course things tend to taste better while camping. I am not sure why.


32 posted on 11/01/2012 11:54:06 AM PDT by yarddog
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To: afraidfortherepublic

Personally I expect something much like the well I think that we are in for something like the collapse of Argentina ( http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=7yerKMQc7-w&feature=grec_index )but on a global scale.

When you add in the fact that their is a growing concern for social unrest regardless of which way the election goes, the next few months will be like walking a mine field.

Recent events show (Flash Mobs, OWS, etc) we have a large entitlement minded population that is violent prone and armed. I think that during a collapse you will see many small businesses wiped out by flash mob looting, and once started it will quickly spread to rape, robbery and murder for murder sake. You will see what I call ‘pocket pogroms’ and if you ain’t ‘Amish’ you better not be around when they come.

Many of these ‘yutes’ will think no more about killing you than most people think about stepping on a roach. That will be the test of many. Most preppers I know are Christian people and they will hesitate to do what they might have to do to stop the ‘yutes’. On the other hand the ‘yutes’ won’t think twice nor lose a minute of sleep, in fact they will smile and laugh about it.

I can’t help, but think of this quote which is one of my favorites:

“Star Trek: Deep Space Nine: The Siege of AR-558 (#7.8)” (1998)

Quark: “Let me tell you something about Hew-mons, Nephew. They’re a wonderful, friendly people, as long as their bellies are full and their holosuites are working. But take away their creature comforts, deprive them of food, sleep, sonic showers, put their lives in jeopardy over an extended period of time and those same friendly, intelligent, wonderful people... will become as nasty and as violent as the most bloodthirsty Klingon. You don’t believe me? Look at those faces. Look in their eyes.”

Clearly there’s a storm coming, as great as a hurricane and like you do when a hurricane comes your way you either prepare to weather it or you become a victim of it.

For those who are just starting or are old hands at prepping you may find my Preparedness Manual helpfull. You can download it at:

http://tomeaker.com/kart/Preparedness1j.pdf

NOTE! THIS IS A FREE DOWNLOAD. I DO NOT MAKE ONE CENT OFF MY PREPAREDNESS MANUAL!

For those of you who haven’t started already it’s time to prepare almost past time maybe. You needed to be stocking up on food guns, ammo, basic household supplies like soap, papergoods, cleaning supplies, good sturdy clothes including extra socks, underwear and extra shoes and boots, a extra couple changes of oil and filters for your car, tools, things you buy everyday start buying two and put one up.

As the LDS say “When the emergency is upon us the time for preparedness has past.”

Or as the bible says: A prudent man sees danger and takes refuge, but the simple keep going and suffer for it.
NIV Proverbs 22:3

“There is no greater disaster than to underestimate danger.
Underestimation can be fatal.”


33 posted on 11/01/2012 11:57:03 AM PDT by Kartographer ("We mutually pledge to each other our lives, our fortunes and our sacred honor.")
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To: Joseph Harrolds

We’re probably a 2.5 here.


34 posted on 11/01/2012 11:58:50 AM PDT by old and tired
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To: yarddog
I keep thinking I am going to stock up on long lasting food but have only got to the point of a few bags of rice and a few cans of spam.

That sure is a great start, both of those have a 10 year plus shelf life, and while not a complete larder, it would suffice for a long while before diet deficiencies kicked in.

With enough water and fuel (a pressure cooker reduces that) to cook a cup of dry rice and a third of a can of spam every day, you would be getting about 1,000 to 1200 calories and the spam could probably get by without refrigeration during the three days of using it, also, the cooked rice can get by without refrigeration for a few hours, so you could split your cooked daily ration into two meals.

With the odds and ends and misc canned goods and oil, maybe even some daily vitamins that you already have in the pantry, it is easy to have a desperation level of short term survival food for a month or two or three.

People will correctly point out the inadequacies of rice and Spam for sustaining health and physical vigor after a couple of weeks, but when you read about the American POWs in Japanese camps and what they ate, you realize that 1100 calories and some protein, can keep you alive for a long while.

While more is needed, you sure made good choices on those two.

35 posted on 11/01/2012 12:04:36 PM PDT by ansel12 (Vote, but don't pretend.)
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To: ansel12

The first year that we moved up here, to WA, we went through a 100 year storm, with 15 degree temperatures, 15 inches of snow that was covered with 2 inches of ice by the time the storm ended. We were without electricity for five days, pipes broke when the temperatures warmed and we had only been the house for two months, so we were totally unprepared.

We lost electricity for three days at a time, two more times that winter. My husband is determined that we will never be that unprepared, again. The only problem could be that we have not stored enough gasoline for a long period of time. We might consider getting a propane fired, whole house generator instead of the gas powered one.


36 posted on 11/01/2012 12:12:01 PM PDT by Eva
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To: afraidfortherepublic

The problem with gasoline generators is they are an internal combustion engine with a carburator. They NEED to be started once a month and run for 15 minutes. You need to check the oil. You need to make sure the gasoline stored in them has fuel stabilizer in it. When you turn it off, it is best to run it dry so there is no fuel left in the carburator. You also need the ability to store several days worth of fuel. They burn about 5 gallons/day. IF you fail to do any of these things your generator may not start when you need it most.

Also, there are many differnt brands of liquid fuel generators. The best are diesel. The best gasoline are Honda Inventers(this is what I have). It was $3600. You can buy an OK Generac for $700. The next thing you need to do is have an electrician wire in a Gentran or Protran switch box next to your house panal. This allows you to bypass your main box and power a select number of circuits in your home($600-1100 installed). This also keeps the power from your generator from going back from your house out to the street and frying the electrcal worker trying to resore power down the road.

The BEST solution is to buy a gas(natural or propane) if you have that available already piped into your house. These turn on automatically once a month and within seconds of losing power. They also cost more($6 to $10k) plus they Gentran switch box. This eliminates the need to run out with your three 5 gallon gas jugs and wait in line(like the poor people today in NJ) and buy the gas you need to run your generator. The problem with that is the gas filling stations pumps run on electricity too.


37 posted on 11/01/2012 12:12:56 PM PDT by woodbutcher1963
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To: Joseph Harrolds
I follow advice from the Mormon Church. Our local Mormon Church will assist you if you are a Christian. They taught me how to home can items from my garden. I was scared to death of the pressure canner.

Google Wendy deWitt or Everything Under the Sun. Ms. deWitt is a Morman and has written the booklet "Everything Under the Sun". She gives excellent advice on how to prepare yourself for disasters. She emphasizes inexpensive preparations that most people can make, given time. The thing is to never stop - make it a lifestyle.

I probably have about 3 years worth of food at this time. I have enough to share with my family and neighbors. I have a whole house generator capable of running all of my electrical needs and a water collection system (thanks to my nephew who is an engineer). I live in hurricane area and we have never lost gas service during a storm. Something to consider is a small investment in Space Bags for vital records, photographs and your food preparation items in the event of flooding.

38 posted on 11/01/2012 12:15:45 PM PDT by texgal (end no-fault divorce laws return DUE PROCESS & EQUAL PROTECTION to ALL citizens))
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To: ansel12
1100 calories a day didn't keep all the prisoners alive. Lots of them died. Including relatives.

When I was living off-grid and doing the mountain-man thing, I was using about 4000 calories a day. Less during the summer, more during the winter.

/johnny

39 posted on 11/01/2012 12:28:14 PM PDT by JRandomFreeper (Gone Galt)
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To: yarddog
I have tried their freeze dried bags where you just add boiling water. This was while camping

The #10 cans contain 10 servings or more of each entree at a significant cost savings over the individual packets. I think that once a can is opened it should be used within a month or so, but I haven't tested it out. I would be interested to know from others who have used the cans what a reasonable time period would be. They are definitely the best tasting of the freeze dried products but do contain a pretty hefty dose of sodium.

40 posted on 11/01/2012 12:29:37 PM PDT by immadashell
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To: Joseph Harrolds

At least a 2-1/2. Food, water, medicine, generator, solar, cocked & locked & ready to rock.


41 posted on 11/01/2012 12:42:35 PM PDT by backwoods-engineer (My game is disruption. I will use lethal force --my vote-- in self-defense against Obama.)
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To: thackney
Then you can selectively use anything in the house.

I would have to be veeeeery selective. Like I said, it is a small generator. It's big enough for the refrigerator, the furnace blower and maybe a couple of lights. I think it is around 1000 watt peak. A local store was having a sale for $99 on it so I picked it up with plans of buying a bigger one later.

Also, there's a difference between opening up the switch powering the furnace, unscrewing the hot and neutral wires and electrical taping them to an extension cord to keep from freezing vs. opening up the breaker box to disconnect my house from the grid unless I was expecting power to be out for a long time. I would like to get an electrician in to isolate a few circuits for emergency use and be able to switch those between the main grid and a generator.

Fortunately all three times I've had power outages over 24 hours have been during the summer and only one of those (also hurricane Ike) was widespread enough where stores got stripped of ice so I lost my refrigerator contents.

42 posted on 11/01/2012 12:47:18 PM PDT by KarlInOhio (Big Bird is a brood parasite: laid in our nest 43 years ago and we are still feeding him.)
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To: woodbutcher1963; Kartographer
The BEST solution is to buy a gas(natural or propane) if you have that available already piped into your house

We love our natural gas generator. I have lived in the mid-atlantic region for over 20 years and while we have lost electric and water, never natural gas. Doesn't mean it can't happen, it is just the most reliable utility.

The generator starts up and runs for a few minutes every week. We keep extra coolant and oil on hand, as well as a back up battery for extended outages. I check the status panel every week to make sure there are green lights across the board and we top off oil and coolant before upcoming storms. Twice a year, the maintenance people come to check it - an added expense but worth it. It's just like taking the car in for a tune up and oil change periodically. In fact, the generator engine IS a car engine.

The generator comes on automatically after 30 seconds without power and shuts off when power is restored. It runs our whole house. Natural gas is cheap right now. Our life is only interrupted for the 30 seconds where we sit and look at each other saying, "hey - is that a power outage?"

One thing on our next-prep list is a battery back up for the sump pumps. While we chose to live on the high ground so don't have to worry about an actual flood, in an extended outage in heavy rain or snow, we may have to shut the generator down to cool off before we can add oil or coolant. Wet basements can happen even on the high ground.

Our natural gas generator isn't the ultimate solution for the ultimate zom-poc (that's what our mountain retreat is for). But it (along with long term food and water storage solutions that I've been practicing and refining since September 12, 2001) has gotten us through Snowmageddon, Son-of-Snowmageddon, numerous tropical and summer storms, that crazy 20 minute hurricane-like storm earlier in the summer, and finally Sandy. Prepping has become such a way of life that I never stop thinking about it any more than I stop thinking about what I'm going to feed the family for dinner. In fact I'd say it has become my favorite and most satisfying hobby.

Big thanks to Kart for all his work here on FR - I am always adding to my knowledge thanks to his efforts!

43 posted on 11/01/2012 12:48:46 PM PDT by meowmeow (In Loving Memory of Our Dear Viking Kitty (1987-2006))
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To: meowmeow; Kartographer
Excellent report on your generator.

I also would like to salute Kartographer. Glad there is a prepper community on FR.

44 posted on 11/01/2012 12:55:39 PM PDT by backwoods-engineer (My game is disruption. I will use lethal force --my vote-- in self-defense against Obama.)
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To: JRandomFreeper

I was always a massive calorie burner and I know very well the need of calories, I was the guy that would trade his C-ration peaches and fruit cocktail for the calorie dense, but less desirable, fruit cake.

Many of those prisoners were not always getting 1100 calories, and it took them a long time to die, we also learned that young men starve quicker than older men, because the older man’s furnace doesn’t burn so hot, and can better adapt to low calories.

I praised the rice and Spam as a great start, and hoped that I did an adequate job of making clear that I knew it’s limitations and inadequacies.

I want to show people how easy it is to get started, and how for little money and trouble, they can instantly transform themselves from none preppers, or preppers in sentiment only, into having a month or twos worth of long term storage foods, with a single visit to the grocery store.

In recent years my preparedness interest is in getting people to get their feet wet, to get them to break the ice by getting started with some simple storage items rather than waiting to make the single, bulk purchase of freeze dried foods, or to makeover their personal lives into becoming bulk shoppers who rotate everything.

White rice and Spam is a great start, besides, double, triple, quadruple the portions, since we are only talking about it.

I was only making an example of how long term, last ditch, survival preparations, are in reach of everyone.


45 posted on 11/01/2012 1:11:36 PM PDT by ansel12 (Vote, but don't pretend.)
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To: meowmeow

“Wet basements can happen even on the high ground.”

Do you have gutters?

I added gutters connected to PVC drain tile to a dry well to get the water away from my foundation. This should correct your water problem if you are on high ground. There was a tremendous amount of water that would run off my roof and then down my foundation and eventually leak onto my basement floor. The gutters took care of 90% of it. I added draintile pipe to get it 20’ away from the house and now my basement is always dry.


46 posted on 11/01/2012 1:13:41 PM PDT by woodbutcher1963
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To: ansel12
I was thinking more of the calorie rationing side of the house... occupational hazard... instead of just getting started on protecting the family. You have a great point.

BTW, I didn't drag those 4000 calories a day in from my monthly or bi-monthly trips to town. Lots of those calories came from local area forage.

Prepping is a mindset and skillsets as well as what you have in your hand. The nice thing about the mountain experience is that it taught me that I can thrive without too much in material posessions.

The experience did drive me to study my chemistry, geology, and biology a little harder than I would have without it. It can be important to know what kinds of rocks can do what kinds of things. ;)

/johnny

47 posted on 11/01/2012 1:26:31 PM PDT by JRandomFreeper (Gone Galt)
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To: KarlInOhio
I would have to be veeeeery selective. Like I said, it is a small generator. It's big enough for the refrigerator, the furnace blower and maybe a couple of lights. I think it is around 1000 watt peak.

Yes, for that size, it would hardly be worth the trouble.

My 5,500 kW is 120/240V. It added convince of lots of items running, but also creates the problem of being a bigger gasoline hog. By the 5th day, it was getting hard to find gas stations with both fuel and electricity to pump it.

48 posted on 11/01/2012 1:28:41 PM PDT by thackney (life is fragile, handle with prayer)
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To: texgal

“a water collection system “

Sadly, IIRC, I think they’ve become illegal (or almost illegal) in some areas. I think they’re monitored, discouraged, and/or taxed. California comes to mind. Not positive, but that comes to mind.


49 posted on 11/01/2012 1:48:00 PM PDT by MayflowerMadam
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To: woodbutcher1963

We do have gutters. But while we are on the high ground, it isn’t the highest ground - our neighbor to the east is slightly higher and we get his run-off. We’ve tried all sorts of things over the years with limited success (and it’s an old house). So far the sump-pumps have been the best solution.


50 posted on 11/01/2012 1:50:03 PM PDT by meowmeow (In Loving Memory of Our Dear Viking Kitty (1987-2006))
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