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To: Ernest_at_the_Beach
The prodigious litigator, spotted by the CipherLaw Blog, has made Intel, Wind River and Hertz its latest opponents citing its patent for using a shared seed value to generate pseudo-random key values at transmitter and receiver.

WTF!? Seriously. -- That technique's been in use since the beginning of digital computing, probably before if you consider the history of cyphering.
These people need to be tarred and feathered, laughed out of town, and if they return, shot.

3 posted on 11/09/2012 10:27:34 AM PST by OneWingedShark (Q: Why am I here? A: To do Justly, to love mercy, and to walk humbly with my God.)
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To: OneWingedShark

The subtleties of what can be patented will ensure for much intrigue, as there are competing philosophies. But in general, in order to have something patentable, one has to have an apparatus doing it. If apparatus has already been doing this prior to the alleged patent, then that ought to invalidate the patent. It would also sound like something our libertarian friends, the Electronic Freedom Foundation, would want to attack head on given sufficient resources.


4 posted on 11/09/2012 10:49:37 AM PST by HiTech RedNeck (cat dog, cat dog, alone in the world is a little cat dog)
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To: OneWingedShark

That is, prior to the alleged invention being patented...


5 posted on 11/09/2012 10:50:25 AM PST by HiTech RedNeck (cat dog, cat dog, alone in the world is a little cat dog)
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To: OneWingedShark
Google found this:

http://www.google.com/patents/US5412730

*************************************EXCERPT*************************************

A modem suitable for transmitting encrypted data over voice-grade telephone line. The modem is implemented by the combination of integrated circuit components including a microprocessor, a serial communications controller which communicates with connected data terminal equipment, and a modulator/demodulator for translating between voice band tone signals and digital data. Pseudo random number generators are employed at both the transmitting and receiving stations to supply identical sequences of encryption keys to a transmitting encoder and a receiving decoder. An initial random number seed value is made available to both stations. The random number generators are advanced at times determined by predetermined characteristics of the data being transmitted so that, after transmission has taken place, the common encryption key can be known only to the transmitting and receiving stations.

InventorMichael F. Jones
Original AssigneeTelequip Corporation
Current U.S. Classification380/46; 380/29; 380/262; 380/266
International Classification: H04L 900

View patent at USPTO
Search USPTO Assignment Database

7 posted on 11/09/2012 10:57:23 AM PST by Ernest_at_the_Beach ((The Global Warming Hoax was a Criminal Act....where is Al Gore?))
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To: OneWingedShark
This is an innovator's worst nightmare - having products in the market, then being slapped, out of the blue, with a frivolous lawsuit. When the judicial system is technology illiterate and a troll finds a friendly judge who essentially nails a shingle to his courtroom door that says "open for funny business", then the outcome of these suits become precedents, or they're a very high risk endeavor to defend.

I've been working with computing since 1979 (deep across and into the entire computing stack, including the logic circuit level). Encryption has always been available, borrowing from technologies dating back before the Enigma machine.

10 posted on 11/09/2012 11:05:36 AM PST by uncommonsense (Conservatives believe what they see; Liberals see what they believe.)
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