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Vanity......I now need a good chainsaw blade sharpener after Sandy.
me | today | me

Posted on 11/20/2012 11:59:15 PM PST by onona

Can anyone recommend a good chainsaw blade sharpener ? Thank you.


TOPICS: Chit/Chat
KEYWORDS: chainsaw
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1 posted on 11/20/2012 11:59:28 PM PST by onona
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To: onona

I cut about five cords a season for fuel and I would not use an electric sharpener so I cant help you. Electric sharpeners waste a lot of chain. you also need to file down the guides as you go. If you do not overheat and quench a chain it will sharpen quite easily, it will stay sharp a long time if you dont hit the ground and take extra effort to knock off dirt filled bark , theres a lot of dirt in some tree bark next to roads especially


2 posted on 11/21/2012 12:07:15 AM PST by KTM rider
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To: onona

I cut about five cords a season for fuel and I would not use an electric sharpener so I cant help you. Electric sharpeners waste a lot of chain. you also need to file down the guides as you go. If you do not overheat and quench a chain it will sharpen quite easily, it will stay sharp a long time if you dont hit the ground and take extra effort to knock off dirt filled bark , theres a lot of dirt in some tree bark next to roads especially


3 posted on 11/21/2012 12:07:15 AM PST by KTM rider
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To: KTM rider

You file by hand ?


4 posted on 11/21/2012 12:09:33 AM PST by onona (Don't mean nothin, Molon Labe.)
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To: onona

I always hated using a chainsaw. I usually just sharpened mine by hand with a file...seemed to work OK.

I saw a cheap sharpener at Harbor Freight a while back...not sure how good it was.


5 posted on 11/21/2012 12:10:08 AM PST by Bobalu (It is not obama we are fighting, it is the media.)
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To: onona

Filing by hand may seem tedious, but it is effective. You can use an angle guide at first, but as you practice you will find it uncommonly easy. I heat with wood year round and always keep spare chains at the ready. The advice about dirt is spot on. Don’t be afraid of hand sharpening, you’ll grow to enjoy it. I do use a workbench clamp to hold the blade and chainsaw steady. Good luck!


6 posted on 11/21/2012 12:26:20 AM PST by Thomas Truxtun
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To: onona
yes filing by hand is the pros way to do it but it takes some basic knowledge of technique and principles or it is a waste of effort.

However if you dont mind buying a lot chains the grinder may be your style, the chain will last 10 times longer by hand sharpening I cut down a lot of trees and brush when wildland firefighting and working for a tree service so I know a little about it

7 posted on 11/21/2012 12:26:24 AM PST by KTM rider
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To: KTM rider

I guess I have some research and learning to do :)


8 posted on 11/21/2012 12:28:29 AM PST by onona (Don't mean nothin, Molon Labe.)
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To: onona

Hand sharpen, practice, and keep the chain well oiled and clean.


9 posted on 11/21/2012 12:31:29 AM PST by count-your-change (You don't have to be brilliant, not being stupid is enough.)
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To: onona

A small round file works just fine for me.


10 posted on 11/21/2012 12:39:22 AM PST by South40 ("Islam has a proud tradition of tolerance." - Barack Hussein Obama - Cairo, Egypt, June 4, 2009.)
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To: count-your-change

Don’t forget a good pair of leather gloves when sharpening. At my age I bleed real easy.


11 posted on 11/21/2012 12:41:21 AM PST by fella ("As it was before Noah, so shall it be again,")
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To: onona
it helps even if you use an electric sharpener , I take a file out with me when I go out hunting permit firewood in the forest .

its pretty simple but like I said before there are important things that get overlooked like the guides between the cutters and the condition of the bar , also if you get the chain hot and hit snow or water the chain gets tempered and wont sharpen. Just a little more to it than dragging a file or grinder thru the cutters

12 posted on 11/21/2012 12:42:21 AM PST by KTM rider
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To: onona

Harbor Freight has a number of them on sale now.


13 posted on 11/21/2012 1:05:54 AM PST by golux
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To: onona
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=-PTXj1VIlbc
14 posted on 11/21/2012 1:17:23 AM PST by TChad
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To: onona
I've used a hand file and guide for years and I had a chainsaw timber mill. Both of my saws are Stihl, but it seems these new Stihl chainsaw files are only good for a few uses. At 3 files for about $5, I sure they're Chinese, and what's worse, the new Stihl chain doesn't hold up as well either, IMO.

So I went looking for something better to sharpen my chainsaw with. Of all the options, this is the fastest, easiest and wastes no more metal than a file would:

You can get them from your Stihl dealer or online. They're about $6 for three and last about 4 - 5 uses each. I use them with my dremel tools (both 110 and battery pack units) to quickly sharper the chains on both saws. My biggest is a Stihl 660 with a 28" bar. Stihl makes a battery operated grinder for use with these but a dremel works well and most handymen already own one.

A tip is to sharpen both left and right cutters from the same side (right side) of the bar. Otherwise the grinder will try to rise up out of the cutter on the left side, due to rotation of the tool.

Keep proper angles when grinding. It's not hard with a little practice. If you get off, use the file and file-guide to correct the angles. Stihl chain has the proper angle laser etched into each cutter.

Good luck and stay safe! :)

15 posted on 11/21/2012 1:31:02 AM PST by Errant
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To: onona

http://www.freerepublic.com/focus/news/2961385/posts?page=1

Here’s a FR thread from the other day. There MAY be some tips from Estibaliz Carranza on how to sharpen a chain saw.


16 posted on 11/21/2012 1:40:08 AM PST by 21twelve (So I [God] gave them over to their stubborn hearts to follow their own devices. Psalm 81:12)
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To: onona
Wow. I'm a logger and I see some things in here that are spot on and some that made me laugh. A chainsaw has bar and a chain not a “blade”.
A small round file????? Different chains take different files. A great way to screw up a good chain is to file it with the wrong size of file.
I do hand file but also have several extra chains ready to go at all times. Find a good saw shop and have them sharpen your chains ever fourth or fifth time you need them sharpened. If they grind the chain correctly it will not take that much off of it and it will fix any mistakes you have made with a file.
Keep the chain out of the dirt and rocks period. But know that if you use a saw in the real world all day that you will “rock” the chain now and then. Don't fight a dull chain. Either file it or change it right off the bat when you mess it up or realize it is dull.
The last thing I will say is to use a saw big enough to get the job done. Take care of the saws by keeping them clean, air filters as well as the bar and case, and the chains sharp. Don't be afraid to grease what needs it. Husky and the other saw, just kidding about the white one, (stihl) both make homeowner saws and pro saws. You get what you pay for. I like high speed husqvarna pro saws, the XP series. I like blondes too.
17 posted on 11/21/2012 1:40:57 AM PST by oldenuff2no
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To: oldenuff2no

Have you ever used carbide cutter chain? I’m thinking of giving it a try. It’s about twice as expensive via ebay.


18 posted on 11/21/2012 1:49:43 AM PST by Errant
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To: onona; oldenuff2no
Like oldenuff2no mentioned above, different size files and grinders for different size chains. Dealers have charts if you know your chain size and it's listed on the file/grinder package.
19 posted on 11/21/2012 1:53:01 AM PST by Errant
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To: Errant

Yes I’ve used the carbide chains. I go through a couple chains a day normally and sharpen them when I get home. I did not find that much of an advantage with the carbide. I use oregon chain. I buy it by the spool and make my own chains.


20 posted on 11/21/2012 2:04:47 AM PST by oldenuff2no
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To: oldenuff2no
Most of my cutting now is cutting up hardwood firewood, downed trees, trimming and so forth. Lots of deadwood, dirt and ground strikes. I may give carbide a try and see how well it holds up under those circumstances.

Thanks,

21 posted on 11/21/2012 2:12:24 AM PST by Errant
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To: oldenuff2no

I use a dremel on my hedge trimmer. Never tried it on the chain saw. I just get a new blade...and yes, gloves are essential.


22 posted on 11/21/2012 2:59:54 AM PST by Tula Git
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To: Errant

placed an oregon chain on my Husky, cuts like in butter, watch out for your limbs though!


23 posted on 11/21/2012 3:03:11 AM PST by urbanpovertylawcenter (where the law and poverty collide in an urban setting and sparks fly)
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To: onona

I am not a proessional tree guy like some here, but have used both a file and one of the expensive grinder type sharpeners on my chains. The power sharpeners will put a new edge on the cutters, and will correct a mis-sharpened chain that wanders as it cuts, but they do significantly shorten chain life.

A proper size round file and a flat file for the rakers is all I use now. Chains cut well and last a long time. Cutting downed trees quickly dulls the chains from dirt that gets caked on the bark, not to mention any ground contact with the chain.


24 posted on 11/21/2012 3:34:18 AM PST by wrench
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To: onona

I’m a city boy. Where I come from, the only thing we can use a chainsaw for is if you’re making a low budget horror movie or attending a family reunion with relatives you hate.


25 posted on 11/21/2012 3:37:50 AM PST by lowbridge (Joe Biden: "Look, the Taliban per se is not our enemy.")
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To: KTM rider

“..filing by hand is the pros way to do it”

Real pros use a grinder. Preferably the Silvey. Not cheap, but made in the USA.

I can tell you firsthand that after a day of cutting on steep ground, running from yellow-jackets, dodging rattlers & widow-makers and driving 2 foot wedges the last thing a ‘real pro’ is going to do is spend 2-3 hours hand filing a 48” chain.

Believe me, I know these things.


26 posted on 11/21/2012 4:03:28 AM PST by panaxanax
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To: oldenuff2no

I’ll bet you use a skip tooth or chipper chain too. They’re more dangerous but have a far superior performance than the ones that come with the Big Box sold saws. There’s something really special when you’re bucking a nice size tree and the chips are flying 5-6 feet behind you. Almost as good as sex! Best saw I ever owned was a Stihl O38. Torque was unbelievable. I started working with my dad in Southern Oregon in evenings and weekends cutting wood for sale when I was about 8. Still have my timesheets where he paid me ten cents an hour.


27 posted on 11/21/2012 4:05:02 AM PST by Portcall24
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To: oldenuff2no

onona

You are spot on I use to hand file all the time after about 40 years of useing a saw. I now do like you do after every 4 or 5 sharpings I take them to the shop for 5 bucks each I have them sharpen them.

I keep 4 chains on hand they are normmaly good to cut around 20 plus pickup loads. Before they go back to the shop.

Its not a good feeling when you rock a chain about an hour after you get it back from the shop.

One can cut a lot of wood if the only thing you cut is wood but dang the rocks and ground just seems to jump up and hit the chain.


28 posted on 11/21/2012 4:11:39 AM PST by riverrunner
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To: oldenuff2no; Errant

I also tried the carbide chain. Very dangerous when the tips kept flying off, plus almost impossible to sharpen with a regular file. Tossed ‘em over the bank.

The absolute worst spool of chain I ever bought was made by Carlton. The teeth were way too soft and wouldn’t hold an edge. Oregon is still the best, IMO.

I, too, got a few laughs this morning from some of the advice given here. Seems of late that everyone is an expert about these things because they’ve seen a few episodes of Ax-Men.


29 posted on 11/21/2012 4:37:57 AM PST by panaxanax
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To: onona

Joe down the street from me does a great job - if you’re ever in S. MS, look me up and I’ll introduce you to him.


30 posted on 11/21/2012 5:00:31 AM PST by trebb (Allies no longer trust us. Enemies no longer fear us.)
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To: onona
I have a $30 four inch vise from Harbor Freight. I'll first cut a good sized tree down and then cut the stump horizontally at work bench height. I bolt the vise to the stump with lag bolts.

I then clamp the chain saw by the bar in the vise and sharpen the chain while still on the saw. It only takes about two or three minutes to sharpen the chain. The proper sized file diameter is very important. It usually tells on the chain packaging what size file to get. I use up about one file per chain. I put an old garbage can over the vise if I plan to be in the same area for a while.

I've been doing this for about 40 years. I've only taken a chain to a shop once. That's when I got a new saw with hardened surfaces that could not be filed with a file.

31 posted on 11/21/2012 5:02:12 AM PST by norwaypinesavage (Galileo: In science, the authority of a thousand is not worth the humble reasoning of one individual)
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To: oldenuff2no

I also use the correct size file for touch up and dont sweat the depth any more cause I found out the tractor place I go to will sharpen them for me for 6 bucks.
So I bought a spare for each saw(2) and drop them off occasionally for a good job.I usually do this when the cuttings from the saw start to look like saw dust vs shavings and the cut gets wavy.Maybe once a year for me
I am lucky the store is only a few miles from here.
So if there is a shop near by the original poster can try that.


32 posted on 11/21/2012 5:09:25 AM PST by CGASMIA68
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To: panaxanax

Timberline chain sharpener. Awesome! Simple to use and very effective.


33 posted on 11/21/2012 5:14:19 AM PST by franklin50
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To: oldenuff2no

My local lawn mower repair shop does an excellent chain sharpening job for $5.
I can get through a cut with a small rat tail file but have learned to keep a couple of spare chains in the carry case.

And always keep the chain up out of the dirt. Lasts longer that way.


34 posted on 11/21/2012 5:25:31 AM PST by Eric in the Ozarks (In the game of life, there are no betting limits)
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To: onona

BTTT. Bookmark for great info.


35 posted on 11/21/2012 5:48:48 AM PST by exit82 ("The Taliban is on the inside of the building" E. Nordstrom 10-10-12)
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To: onona

I was told by a tree service guy to sharpen my chain lightly at every refill of gasoline. It really works and I use a Sears electric sharpener to do the job. Just plug it into the truck and go. It takes about minute.

It preserves the engine as it doesn’t have to run so hard. I would rather buy new chains than new engines.

I use a Stihl Farm Boss. Nothing better.


36 posted on 11/21/2012 6:15:01 AM PST by buffaloguy
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To: onona

I have tried multiple sharpening systems. As others have pointed out the best way to preserve the life of the chain is to sharpen them by hand. I have one of these:

http://www.northerntool.com/shop/tools/product_200308557_200308557?cm_mmc=Google-pla-_-Logging-_-Chain%20Saw%20Sharpeners%2C%20Maintenance%20%2B%20Repair-_-1976&ci_sku=1976&ci_gpa=pla&ci_kw={keyword}&gclid=CNuuwsSd4LMCFcKPPAodBzkAEw

I also have grinding wheel setups for my Dremel. If you sharpen the blade by hand, clean the air filter, make sure the bar oil is filled and always mix FRESH gas you should never have many problems.

Do you have an air compressor to clean out around the clutch and automatic oiler and air filter? This is very important in maintaining your saw. If the oiler gets plugged, the blade will bind. It can also effect the blade brake from engaging.


37 posted on 11/21/2012 6:27:00 AM PST by woodbutcher1963
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To: panaxanax; oldenuff2no; urbanpovertylawcenter
Maybe I just need to switch to Oregon brand chain then.

Thanks,

38 posted on 11/21/2012 6:45:54 AM PST by Errant
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To: onona

Check out Bailey’s for files and guides. They have some of the best prices. The only time I use a grinder is when the chain is too dinged up to work it out by hand. Even then, I usually finish it out by hand to get a good, even edge on both sides.


39 posted on 11/21/2012 6:48:44 AM PST by pallis
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To: onona
I just keep several chains handy and take them to the shop when most of them get dull and they get sharpened by someone who frankly does it better than I could.

Speaking only for myself, mind you.

40 posted on 11/21/2012 6:52:11 AM PST by OKSooner ("I will bless those who bless thee, and I will curse those who curse thee.")
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To: onona

You can get a good trianglular shaped file and do it yourself in minutes

I used to take them off and take them in to get sharpened, yes they do a better job but not much, and there is a lot to be said about being back up and running in minutes as opposed to days

I did keep several chains handy that I did take in to be sharpened, but I found after a while it was easier to get out the file and touch them up a bit right then and there while I was using it- dont even remove the chain from the saw

5 minutes and - go

There is also home sharpener tools you can buy- it is cheaper after use it 5 times its paid for iteself


41 posted on 11/21/2012 6:59:26 AM PST by Mr. K (some days even my lucky rocketship underpants don't help...)
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To: oldenuff2no

that is a great tip for when the zombie apocolypse comes- have extra chain and files ready to make and sharpen your own

(also some stored gas, i guess)

Anyone know how to make an alcohol that will burn in a gas engine?


42 posted on 11/21/2012 7:08:05 AM PST by Mr. K (some days even my lucky rocketship underpants don't help...)
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To: oldenuff2no

Exactly.
You will totally screw up a good chain if you use the wrong size/wrong angle file. Even to the point where it’s junk and can’t be sharpened.

I had to get a new chain for my Mcullouch earlier this year and I spent an extra ten bucks to get the right sized/angled file.

Even though the correct file is the SAME diameter as the one I was previously using, the difference is like night and day, this one goes through and don’t even sweat doing it.


43 posted on 11/21/2012 7:09:47 AM PST by djf (Conservative ideals help the poor. Liberal practice help them STAY poor!!!)
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To: exit82
If in doubt about which file to use on your particular chain, consult the guy who sold the chainsaw. 1/4 “ or 3/8 “ files for different size chain teeth...
44 posted on 11/21/2012 9:14:23 AM PST by Eric in the Ozarks (In the game of life, there are no betting limits)
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To: panaxanax
thats right buttercup, its three miles back to the truck to go get yout electric sharpener. if it takes you an hour to sharpen by hand then you better get going, a man can walk three miles an hour. Sharpening a short bar only takes me about 5 minutes, sitting in the dirt with it clamped between my legs, 20 minutes if its real bad.

I have seen that alot where a lumberjack spends an hour fiddling with the file and it still aint sharp or cuts in a circle

Watch out for the rattlesnakes, bears and widowmakers along the way

What I meant was a pro should know how to sharpen by hand, maybe they have battery powered sharpeners now that you can pack along. I know chain and bar sets sure are cheep now, compared to back when I was a pup doing forest work. So grind away and maybe the boss wont care about gobbling up chain, or if it takes some worker an hour maybe its cheaper to just let them grind.

I luv this thread , reminds me of the ones on the chainsaw forums LOL , (like an oil thread on a car forum)

45 posted on 11/21/2012 3:18:00 PM PST by KTM rider
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To: Mr. K

Do not burn alcohol or alcohol mixed gas, ethanol, in a chainsaw. You will have a very expensive lesson. Even with a heavier oil mix it will not work out well in the long run.


46 posted on 11/21/2012 5:39:50 PM PST by oldenuff2no
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To: KTM rider; oldenuff2no

KTM,
It’s obvious you don’t know jack-$hit about being on a REAL logging job.

“Sharpening a short bar only takes me about 5 minutes..”

I’m talking about REAL logging where we used 48”-60” bars on gutted & tricked-out Stihl 075’s, 090’s or a ‘carted old Mac’. Skip-tooth .404 or 1/2” chain. You probably don’t even know what I’m talking about, do you?

Every real faller I have ever worked with knew how to hand file a chain as good or better than by grinding. Plus, we always took at least 4 extras in with us, depending on how rocky the ground was or what type of timber we were cutting. Old growth Doug Fir can be damn near as hard as Oak while Sugar Pine cuts like butter. No need to hand file at the stump, just switch chains and get back to work. Grind ‘em when you get back to camp.

“battery powered sharpeners” are for homeowners.

“buttercup”?......LOL

Perhaps you’ll be more comfortable back on the so-called logging forums where you might actually impress some little girls into thinking you’re for real.

Oldenuff2no is a pro. Heed his advice, little pup.


47 posted on 11/21/2012 8:30:14 PM PST by panaxanax
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To: woodbutcher1963
That sharpening jig you are showing is also sold at Lowes, NAPA and even Sears.
Best thing since sliced bread.
It, proper size file for your particular chain and proper depth set gauge are all you need.
Takes about 15 minutes on my 28" Homelite Super XL (Last good chainsaw Homelite made).
Own 4 chain saws, 28", 18", 12" and a 10" pole saw, works great on all.
When you start seeing sawdust instead of chunks of wood flying, time to sharpen.
Been using chain saws since I was 13 and now 66 years old.
48 posted on 11/21/2012 9:22:09 PM PST by The Cajun (Sarah Palin, Mark Levin......Nuff said.)
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To: panaxanax
LOL you gotta be one of those guys from the Axe Men TV show

LOL ! LOL! LOL !

so sorry I hurt your feelings, OK you are the big bad logger, LOL !

you win ! grind away fruitcake

49 posted on 11/21/2012 11:54:36 PM PST by KTM rider
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To: panaxanax
What is the best mix oil ?

I use Motul600 50:1

50 posted on 11/21/2012 11:59:51 PM PST by KTM rider
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