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HAVE YOU USED THE GENOGRAPHIC PROJECT?
ME

Posted on 11/28/2012 2:41:29 PM PST by WHATNEXT?

Thinking of getting the kit for a Christmas gift.


TOPICS: Education; Health/Medicine; History; Science
KEYWORDS: dna; familytree; genoproject; godsgravesglyphs; helixmakemineadouble
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I got the National Geographic Christmas catalog and it has a full page on the Genographic Project. There is also information at the link site for Family Tree that will only give DNA connected to a family name.

So, the question is ... trace back DNA of person to routes of origin or only family name connection or both.

Thoughts from those who have used one or both.

1 posted on 11/28/2012 2:41:39 PM PST by WHATNEXT?
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To: WHATNEXT?

what do the results show?


2 posted on 11/28/2012 2:47:53 PM PST by MNDude
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To: WHATNEXT?

I bought the kit several years ago when they first began the project. Supposedly my DNA showed my routes of origin were from Africa, which then traveled to Europe. Nothing more specific. But, with the advances of DNA testing since then, I’m not sure if they are offering any information of more significance.


3 posted on 11/28/2012 2:56:16 PM PST by mass55th (Courage is being scared to death - but saddling up anyway...John Wayne)
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To: mass55th

4 posted on 11/28/2012 2:58:10 PM PST by Daffynition (Self-respect: the secure feeling that no one, as yet, is suspicious. ~ HLM)
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To: WHATNEXT?
Is that the same one that Acncestry.com offers that has 700,000 bits of data? I have the 34 marker one that wasn't much help. So what if someone along the line changed their name. Will the DNA help.
5 posted on 11/28/2012 3:01:56 PM PST by mountainlion (Live well for those that did not make it back.)
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To: WHATNEXT?
Hadn't heard of this. I saw this blurb on their website:

"National Geographic Explorer-in-Residence Robert Ballard, best known for his discovery of the R.M.S. Titanic, thought he knew everything about his ancestry, with a genealogy that traces back to the British Isles and Holland. While most of his DNA agrees with this story, he learned something unexpected from his Geno 2.0 results—his genome is about 2% Oceanian, connecting him to the first seafarers who settled the islands off the coast of southeast Asia around 50,000 years ago, probably via the Dutch side of his family."

6 posted on 11/28/2012 3:02:02 PM PST by GunRunner (***Not associated with any criminal actions by the ATF***)
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To: WHATNEXT?
I am awaiting my results from the 2.0 kit. It says:

“Most non-Africans are about 2.5% Neanderthal. Indigenous sub-Subsaharan Africans have no Neanderthal DNA because their ancestors did not migrate through Eurasia.”

It also says that non-Africans average 1.6% “Denisovan,” a newly discovered Eurasian hominid “cousin” with whom there also was interbreeding.

7 posted on 11/28/2012 3:17:48 PM PST by Seizethecarp (Defend aircraft from "runway kill zone" mini-drone helicopter swarm attacks: www.runwaykillzone.com)
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To: Seizethecarp

The Nat Geo GENO 2.0 DNA kit is very up-to-date to have the Denisovan DNA in the test already. They only found the first evidence of such a “hominin” in 2010! http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Denisova_hominin Denisova hominins (/dɪ̈ˈniːsÉ™vÉ™/), or Denisovans, are Paleolithic-era members of the genus Homo that may belong to a previously unknown species of human. In March 2010, scientists announced the discovery of a finger bone fragment of a juvenile female who lived about 41,000 years ago, found in the remote Denisova Cave in the Altai Mountains in Siberia, a cave which has also been inhabited by Neanderthals and modern humans.[1][2][3] A tooth and toe bone belonging to different members of the same population have since been found. Analysis of the mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) of the finger bone showed it to be genetically distinct from the mtDNAs of Neanderthals and modern humans.[4] Subsequent study of the nuclear genome from this specimen suggests this group shares a common origin with Neanderthals, they ranged from Siberia to Southeast Asia, and they lived among and interbred with the ancestors of some present-day modern humans, with up to 6% of the DNA of Melanesians and Australian Aborigines deriving from Denisovans.[5][6] Similar analysis of a toe bone discovered in 2011 is underway.[7]


8 posted on 11/28/2012 3:25:16 PM PST by Seizethecarp (Defend aircraft from "runway kill zone" mini-drone helicopter swarm attacks: www.runwaykillzone.com)
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To: WHATNEXT?

My DNA is going to show that I am the long lost brother of whoever wins that big lottery jackpot.


9 posted on 11/28/2012 3:29:59 PM PST by blueunicorn6 ("A crack shot and a good dancer")
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To: Seizethecarp

I did this and the “cohen” project DNA.

Unsurprisingly, I found I am middle eastern with a dash of European.

Have a common ancestor male with most other Jewish folk and most arabs circa 3500 years ago.


10 posted on 11/28/2012 3:32:38 PM PST by Jewbacca (The residents of Iroquois territory may not determine whether Jews may live in Jerusalem.)
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To: Jewbacca

Adam?


11 posted on 11/28/2012 3:37:24 PM PST by dinoparty
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To: dinoparty

Abraham, presumably.


12 posted on 11/28/2012 3:41:52 PM PST by Jewbacca (The residents of Iroquois territory may not determine whether Jews may live in Jerusalem.)
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To: WHATNEXT?

If you already know the village or district where your ancestors lived, do you learn anything useful from getting this DNA information?


13 posted on 11/28/2012 3:54:02 PM PST by Verginius Rufus
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To: Daffynition

You’re just daring them to pick you off.


14 posted on 11/28/2012 4:08:38 PM PST by bigheadfred
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To: WHATNEXT?

My husband and I did the National Geographic DNA thing a few years ago and we thought it was really fun and interesting. I had previously read Brian Sykes “Seven Daughters of Eve” and it was a good sidekick for the results. Mostly because it was easier to visualize the ancestress with his little fictional account. For the record, he was Helena and I was from Jasmine (the eldest and youngest of the mothers respectively). We also go a nifty dvd that was about 1.5 hours and showed the original scientist traveling through the main places that the project refers to, finishing with the modern day area in Kazakstan (I think) that is the crossroads for each of the lines who left Africa.

My maternal line was from Ireland about 150 years ago, and my dad is a professional genealogist who has traced the actual women back. Our Jasmine line is shown to have travelled along the coastline from the Levant around the Mediterranean and around Spain up to Ireland. My grandmother’s grandmother emigrated from Ireland to the northern coast of England, and my grandmother moved from there to the east coast of the US. My mom and I always have been happier at the beach than anywhere else on earth, saying we wouldn’t be able to live further than a day’s journey away, so it was funny to see that our line has been very coastal for ten thousand years, and maybe there was something to our love of the beach!


15 posted on 11/28/2012 4:24:55 PM PST by Rutabega (If you don't want me in your personal affairs, don't stick your hand out for my help.)
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To: mountainlion

I don’t think so. Family Tree for surname is the other option. Men have a clearer lineage record from DNA. A male family members DNA can trace which line of your surname your family follows. If your immigration surname is Taylor and many Taylor lines immigrated, you can trace which of the immigrants is your line.

Has anybody used the surname from Family Tree?


16 posted on 11/28/2012 4:52:12 PM PST by WHATNEXT?
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To: WHATNEXT?

I’d do it, but it would expose the fact my parents got me by raiding a warthog litter.


17 posted on 11/28/2012 4:57:26 PM PST by Cyber Liberty (Obama considers the Third World morally superior to the United States.)
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To: GunRunner

Yes, the newer 2.0 version is what is being offered. The old price was something like $99.00 and now it is $199.00. Blurb says money over the cost of DNA research goes to fund getting more DNA from groups in migrant route areas.

I read on Wikipedia about Native Americans not wanting to give their DNA for such purposes.


18 posted on 11/28/2012 4:57:47 PM PST by WHATNEXT?
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To: WHATNEXT?
Weird... it traced my DNA:

...and said I came from these guys!:


19 posted on 11/28/2012 4:58:56 PM PST by Boogieman
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To: WHATNEXT?

I did it several years ago with Family Tree DNA, had 36 Y - dna (male) regions checked and 12 regions of mtDNA (female) checked.

Came back that I was a member of haplogroup I1a (Y-DNA) and a member of haplogroup W (mtDNA). Since then those have been refined to I1a1 and W5a haplogroups.

Ila1:

“The I1a lineage likely has its roots in Northern France. Today it is found most frequently within Viking/Scandinavian populations in northwest Europe and has since spread down into Central and Eastern Europe, where it is found at low frequencies”

http://archiver.rootsweb.ancestry.com/th/read/Y-DNA-HAPLOGROUP-I/2006-05/1147111269

W5a:

The W5a lineage spread from Russia to a broad but distinctive area of northern Europe. These dates and range correspond to the spread of the nomadic peoples that brought the horse to Europe.

W5a’s are distinctively distributed in a corridor long the Baltic, up into Scandinavia, and then down Germany, back along the Danube to Romania, and overseas to the British Isles, and the Atlantic Coasts of Portugal and Spain. The west European distribution corresponds to that of the Germanic groups that spread through Europe beginning 3,000 years ago. However the emergence times of the subgroups date back long before that. If the modern distribution is Germanic, then these subgroups must represent horse culture lineages ancestral to the Germans.

http://www.thecid.com/w5.htm

Both haplogroup findings pretty much follow my known family tree - Scots Irish on my father’s side, German / English - Irish on my mother’s side.

The funny thing is later I had some in depth blood testing done due a rare blood disorder. It turned out I had an genetic allele found in the French population near Lorraine, France. I later learned that my ancestral home of Falkland Scotland was home of Mary of Guise from Lorraine, she was the mother of Mary Queen of Scots.


20 posted on 11/28/2012 4:58:56 PM PST by Sparky1776
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To: Jewbacca

Cohen project? Is that like the surname DNA? Could you explain?


21 posted on 11/28/2012 5:02:02 PM PST by WHATNEXT?
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To: Jewbacca

“Have a common ancestor male with most other Jewish folk and most arabs circa 3500 years ago.”

Hmmm.... that sounds awfully like... nah, couldn’t be, the scientifically enlightened liberals tell us that the Bible is just a bunch of old myths with no basis in reality.


22 posted on 11/28/2012 5:02:26 PM PST by Boogieman
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To: Cyber Liberty

Oh, brother!


23 posted on 11/28/2012 5:04:57 PM PST by WHATNEXT?
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To: Boogieman

Hmmmmm.....


24 posted on 11/28/2012 5:06:19 PM PST by WHATNEXT?
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To: WHATNEXT?

http://cohen-levi.org/


25 posted on 11/28/2012 5:12:27 PM PST by jjotto ("Ya could look it up!")
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To: WHATNEXT?

There is a certain bit of DNA shared by most Jews with variations of the last name “Cohen” (Cohn, Coen, etc), which derives from the Hebrew word for priest. It’s assumed that they share this bit of DNA because of their common descent from the priestly tribe of Levites.

I know there was a project originally set up to use test for this marker, in order to determine which populations around the world claiming Jewish descent are actually related to the ancient tribes. If, for example, some tribe in Africa says they are part of the diaspora, they can be tested, and if some of them have the “Cohen” marker, then they have strong evidence for their claim. It sounds like they might have expanded their mission since I last read about them, to tracing ancestry and not just checking for that marker.


26 posted on 11/28/2012 5:13:23 PM PST by Boogieman
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To: WHATNEXT?

Just joking around. (it’s a reference to the Prometheus movie)


27 posted on 11/28/2012 5:14:32 PM PST by Boogieman
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To: Sparky1776

I imaging it took a little study to understand the results. Would you do it again at the higher price of $199.00?


28 posted on 11/28/2012 5:17:12 PM PST by WHATNEXT?
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To: WHATNEXT?
Oh, brother!

Oh, you're my littermate?? ;^)

29 posted on 11/28/2012 5:25:15 PM PST by Cyber Liberty (Obama considers the Third World morally superior to the United States.)
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To: jjotto

Hey, hey, hey.....Thanks for looking it up for me :^) Very fascinating!


30 posted on 11/28/2012 5:27:29 PM PST by WHATNEXT?
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To: Cyber Liberty

You’re quick!


31 posted on 11/28/2012 5:29:13 PM PST by WHATNEXT?
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To: WHATNEXT?

I was just fooling around, but apparently this is a lot deeper than I thought....


32 posted on 11/28/2012 5:37:28 PM PST by Cyber Liberty (Obama considers the Third World morally superior to the United States.)
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To: bigheadfred

33 posted on 11/28/2012 6:20:45 PM PST by Daffynition (Self-respect: the secure feeling that no one, as yet, is suspicious. ~ HLM)
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To: WHATNEXT?

Oops I actually got the “Y-DNA67+mtDNAPlus” kit @ FTDNA and it says it is #399, which is what I think was the price in Oct 2007 when I got it.

At some point I’d like to upgrade to the full sequence - they use the original sample already provided.

Thankfully there are plenty of people out there at DNA sites that help you along.


34 posted on 11/28/2012 6:32:35 PM PST by Sparky1776
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To: WHATNEXT?

I did it, and it verified pretty much what we already knew, but was, I think, very worthwhile for the price. It helps to do additional reading on your own, and now I often dwell on just how different our lives have become and wonder what happened to the strength of those early people. My daughter called today to say she had diagnosed me with ADHD because I have to be busy or working all the time. I told her I was raised by people who believed if you didn’t stay busy and work hard you would run the risk of starving, and so would your children. Now I have a DSM diagnosis. The couch potatoes are the “normal” ones.


35 posted on 11/28/2012 6:49:10 PM PST by binreadin
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To: WHATNEXT?; AdmSmith; agrace; AnalogReigns; Cacique; caryatid; Celtjew Libertarian; CobaltBlue; ...
Genetic
Genealogy
>> PING <<
Send FReepmail if you want on/off GGP list
Marty = Paternal Haplogroup O(2?)(M175)
Maternal Haplogroup H
GG LINKS:
African Ancestry
DNAPrint Genomics
FamilyTree DNA
GeneTree
Int'l Society of Genetic Genealogy
mitosearch
Nat'l Geographic Genographic Project
Oxford Ancestors
RelativeGenetics
Sorenson Molecular Genealogy Foundation
Trace Genetics
ybase
ysearch
The List of Ping Lists

Yep. It was okay.

36 posted on 11/28/2012 6:59:59 PM PST by martin_fierro (< |:)~)
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To: blam; martin_fierro; WHATNEXT?; StayAt HomeMother; Ernest_at_the_Beach; decimon; 1010RD; ...

 GGG managers are SunkenCiv, StayAt HomeMother & Ernest_at_the_Beach
Thanks WHATNEXT? I tried it, and it turned out my genetic match was the ham sandwich I'd eaten for lunch. That was the day I had my car horn changed to a snippet of the theme song from "Deliverance".

To all -- please ping me to other topics which are appropriate for the GGG list.


37 posted on 11/28/2012 7:55:20 PM PST by SunkenCiv (https://secure.freerepublic.com/donate/)
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To: blam; martin_fierro; WHATNEXT?; StayAt HomeMother; Ernest_at_the_Beach; decimon; 1010RD; ...

 GGG managers are SunkenCiv, StayAt HomeMother & Ernest_at_the_Beach
Thanks WHATNEXT? I tried it, and it turned out my genetic match was the ham sandwich I'd eaten for lunch. That was the day I had my car horn changed to a snippet of the theme song from "Deliverance".

To all -- please ping me to other topics which are appropriate for the GGG list.


38 posted on 11/28/2012 7:57:13 PM PST by SunkenCiv (https://secure.freerepublic.com/donate/)
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To: WHATNEXT?; SunkenCiv
I posted this article back in 6-15-2005 and had family's my DNA done. I was very satisfied.

The Genographic Project (Have Your DNA Checked, Find Your Roots)

My DNA data was included in a one-hour National Geographic TV special a few years back.

39 posted on 11/28/2012 8:10:19 PM PST by blam
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To: WHATNEXT?

We did family tree DNA for my father, providing a Y-chromosome for a family name project. Also used DNA consultants for determination of racial breakdown.

Family Tree DNA
Has a more extensive database for Y-chromosome, finding closest matches and info for last common ancestor.
You get a discount if you are going through a project to trace the links between those of the same or a related last name.
But you get a lot of email, both as they analyze the markers and for all of their “specials”.

DNA Consultants
Their DNA database is light on Native Americans. Because my grandfather has both Cherokee and Tejas blood, it came back as saying he was an admixture of Cherokee, Japanese, Chinese, Gypsy, German and English. It couldn’t really handle Native American as a whole percentage when it came from two different tribes. And their reports are darn near useless for genealogy, too abstract.


40 posted on 11/28/2012 8:30:11 PM PST by tbw2
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To: MNDude

If you are really into geneology, then this kit is for you. It follows either paternal or maternal lines. It gives you an idea “who you are” going back to as recently as 10,000 years ago. They also have a service that can tell you names of others that match you genetically to within a very high percentage. Even if it is not a known blood relative. I was surprised to have more than a few Scottsmen in my father’s bloodline, despite that side being 100% Prussian. So there must be something to the Saxon tales of raiders coming from Germany. Worth it? Yes. But only if one is willing to make it a serious pursuit for more than just a day or so.


41 posted on 11/28/2012 9:54:50 PM PST by CT
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To: WHATNEXT?

OJ Simpson jury say:

“DNA...so what everybody gots DNA.”


42 posted on 11/28/2012 10:15:32 PM PST by truth_seeker
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To: Verginius Rufus; SunkenCiv

“If you already know the village or district where your ancestors lived, do you learn anything useful from getting this DNA information?”

Maybe which conquering army marched through back in the day.


43 posted on 11/28/2012 10:51:21 PM PST by wildbill (You're just jealous because the Voices talk oMnly to me.Reid)
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To: binreadin
"I often dwell on just how different our lives have become and wonder what happened to the strength of those early people."

I recently read the following thoughts regarding our early ancestors:

"The struggles of these early ages were characterized by courage, bravery, and even heroism. And we all regret that so many of those sterling and rugged traits of your early ancestors have been lost to the later-day races. While we appreciate the value of many of the refinements of advancing civilization, we miss the magnificent persistency and superb devotion of your early ancestors, which oftentimes bordered on grandeur and sublimity."

44 posted on 11/28/2012 11:42:08 PM PST by concentric circles
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To: CT
There were a lot of mercenary soldiers in earlier centuries (the Hessians sent to America by George III were nothing new--and some of them were from other places than Hesse). Perhaps some men from Scotland signed on as mercenaries in the Thirty Years' War (which England and Scotland stayed out of) and spent time in Germany.

I read something a few years back about a man in England who discovered his paternal ancestry came from a place in Croatia where the same surname is still found--evidently he had an ancestor from there who became a mercenary in one of the wars and eventually settled in England.

45 posted on 11/29/2012 7:33:36 AM PST by Verginius Rufus
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To: truth_seeker
As one of my professors once remarked in class:

"We all have ancestors--we can be proud of that."

46 posted on 11/29/2012 7:35:36 AM PST by Verginius Rufus
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To: CT

>> this kit is for you. It follows either paternal or maternal lines. <<

No, no, no. You’re describing the Genographic 1.0 kit ($99.00). That test indeed is confined to your straight paternal or your straight maternal line. It’s especially good for males who want to trace their surname back for hundreds of years.

On the other hand, the new Genographic 2.0 kit ($199.00) uses “autosomal” DNA — that is, DNA from ALL of your ancestors, not just the unbroken male-to-male and female-to-female lines. In this respect, this new test is similar (although not identical) to FTNDA’s Family Finder test.

There are some very good features of the G 2.0 test, but also some drawbacks. If you’ve got the money, you may as well go for it, especially if you’ve already had Family Finder or the similar autosomal tests from 23andMe or Ancestry.

But if you’re completely new to autosomal testing, you need first to study up on the pros and cons of FTDNA’s Family Finder. It’s on sale until December 31 for $199, and it can beat G 2.0 for some applications.


47 posted on 11/29/2012 7:38:25 AM PST by Hawthorn
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To: GunRunner

Dutch wood pile.


48 posted on 11/29/2012 7:46:45 AM PST by BenLurkin (This is not a statement of fact. It is either opinion or satire; or both)
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To: WHATNEXT?

Judging by surnames...I’m related to a lot of defensive backs in college and pro ball.


49 posted on 11/29/2012 7:51:05 AM PST by BenLurkin (This is not a statement of fact. It is either opinion or satire; or both)
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To: WHATNEXT?

The others posters pretty much told the story, but, long story short most of the males who share the name “Cohen” or a version thereof -— and would, at least according to tradition and the Torah -— be ancestors of Aaron of the Tribe of Levi -— do, indeed, have a common middle eastern male ancestor during the time in question.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Y-chromosomal_Aaron

Obviously, it’s not proof that the common ancestor was, indeed, Aaron, but is certainly very consistent with family histories.


50 posted on 11/29/2012 8:29:46 AM PST by Jewbacca (The residents of Iroquois territory may not determine whether Jews may live in Jerusalem.)
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