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'Les MisÚrables' - A Fitting Lesson For The Age Of Obama
Big Hollywood ^ | December 30, 2012 | Larry O'Connor

Posted on 12/30/2012 6:56:10 PM PST by Bratch

The groundbreaking new film adaptation of the Broadway musical "Les Misérables" features desperate people suffering under soul-shattering unemployment, naive university students decrying the rich and stoking the flames of socialist revolution, unyielding government official interested not in right and wrong but in following his government's rules and one heroic individual who follows his faith in God to guide him from one success to another all the while truly helping others by using his own private wealth rather than through the ineffective and neglectful government.

In short, it is the perfect allegory for Americans living in the Age of Obama.

In 1987 when "Les Miz" opened in New York, many liberal columnists and critics tried desperately to make a connection between the 19th century Victor Hugo story and Ronald Reagan's America. The best they could do was show pictures of homeless in New York and juxtapose them with the desperate characters in the play who I've on the streets of Paris. The comparisons never held water in a macro way considering Americans in the late 1980s enjoyed prosperity across most economic classes. Now that the film is premiering in Barack Obama's America, it's remarkable how the comparisons are much more appropriate.

(Excerpt) Read more at breitbart.com ...


TOPICS: Books/Literature; History; TV/Movies
KEYWORDS: allegory; jeanvaljean; junerebellion; lesmiserables; obama

1 posted on 12/30/2012 6:56:23 PM PST by Bratch
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To: Bratch

originally a recruiting tool for the commies, or something


2 posted on 12/30/2012 6:57:46 PM PST by GeronL (http://asspos.blogspot.com)
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To: Bratch

A beautiful, beautiful story. The love of Christ shines in the darkest of times.


3 posted on 12/30/2012 7:23:46 PM PST by SoFloFreeper
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To: GeronL
Isn't this the story where the naive, meddling students inadvertently help create a situation where France gets invaded?
4 posted on 12/30/2012 7:24:30 PM PST by oldbrowser (They are marxists, don't call them democrats)
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To: Bratch

Very good article. Thanks for posting. Haven’t seen this one yet but have seen the stage musical and the 1935 and 1998 nonmusical film versions.


5 posted on 12/30/2012 7:25:56 PM PST by ReformationFan
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To: oldbrowser

something like that


6 posted on 12/30/2012 7:27:46 PM PST by GeronL (http://asspos.blogspot.com)
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To: Bratch

While I tend to be somewhat averse to people taking classics from long ago and trying to draw current parallels that are often strained, I find this article to be very good.

I’ve seen the stage version.

Victor Hugo did, in Jean ValJean, create a man who in the worst of times retained a focus on God and not on the turmoil around him.

The revolutionaries come off as young, stupid and deadly.

It probably is a film for our times. I’m looking forward to seeing it.


7 posted on 12/30/2012 7:32:54 PM PST by Winstons Julia (Hello OWS? We don't need a revolution like China's; China needs a revolution like OURS.)
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To: Bratch
one heroic individual who follows his faith in God to guide him from one success to another all the while truly helping others by using his own private wealth

The author must have showed up late to the movie. At the beginning of the movie, Jean Valjean, the guy this author is talking about, got his fresh start in the world by stealing the Bishop's silverware. In the novel, Valjean went on to steal money from a small boy.

8 posted on 12/30/2012 7:34:04 PM PST by Tau Food (Never give a sword to a man who can't dance.)
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To: Bratch

While I tend to be somewhat averse to people taking classics from long ago and trying to draw current parallels that are often strained, I find this article to be very good.

I’ve seen the stage version.

Victor Hugo did, in Jean ValJean, create a man who in the worst of times retained a focus on God and not on the turmoil around him.

The revolutionaries come off as young, stupid and deadly.

It probably is a film for our times. I’m looking forward to seeing it.


9 posted on 12/30/2012 7:35:20 PM PST by Winstons Julia (Hello OWS? We don't need a revolution like China's; China needs a revolution like OURS.)
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To: Tau Food

“The author must have showed up late to the movie.”

And you must have read only the excerpt, skipping the rest of the article. So I guess you are even.


10 posted on 12/30/2012 7:42:36 PM PST by newheart (The greatest trick the left ever pulled was convincing the world it was not a religion.)
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To: Bratch

Homelessness in the USA —the LEAST popular story for the US media for the last and next four years....


11 posted on 12/30/2012 7:50:55 PM PST by gaijin
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To: newheart

Also, the author fails to mention that Valjean spent several years shacking up with a prepubescent female. Some hero. These days he would get several hundred years.


12 posted on 12/30/2012 8:04:23 PM PST by Tau Food (Never give a sword to a man who can't dance.)
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To: Tau Food

Unless I am mistaken, Valjean is a fictional character. On its own (sorry they couldnt fit the entire zillion page novel into the play) the film is a brilliant story of the difference between law and grace. But judging from your relentless criticism one might conclude that you are descended from Inspector Javert.


13 posted on 12/30/2012 8:39:44 PM PST by newheart (The greatest trick the left ever pulled was convincing the world it was not a religion.)
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To: Winstons Julia

It is brilliant. Inspiring story of redemption, grace, justice, and mercy. God’s hand on ordinary people in extraordinary circumstances


14 posted on 12/30/2012 9:14:50 PM PST by FlyingEagle
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To: Bratch

The authors attempt to politicize the recent movie “Les Miserable,” is a bit out of focus. The movie actually actually eschews a political message for a story of ultimate human destiny.

The message actually is a highly Christian one because it starts with a mans conversion, and than commitment to live righteously in the face of persecution from the oppressive figures who do not see the world through the lens of God’s plan of salvation.

Javart for example has a skewed notion of justice because he cannot see human beings as God’s children.

The movie blends this dichotomy between justice and mercy in some amazing scenes. The kindness of the Cleric who is almost stupidly zealous with giving to Valjean for example. Such charity seems insane on one level, but it also reveals Valjean what God’s love for him is actually like. He literally gets a second chance in life to live well and in his grace and to give in charity to others that same second chance he had received from God.

Ultimately, I’d reject the notion that the barricade can be easily seen as a purely political symbol, because it also represents the conviction of individuals who think that all human beings have an inherent dignity that must be respected. I’d note that conditions that obtained in post Napoleon France are not easily transposed to our current society.

I’d highly recommend watching this movie. It’s one of the most edifying movies I’ve seen come from Hollywood in years.


15 posted on 12/30/2012 9:27:20 PM PST by Bayard
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To: FlyingEagle

Not to mention, great music.


16 posted on 12/30/2012 9:59:57 PM PST by Winstons Julia (Hello OWS? We don't need a revolution like China's; China needs a revolution like OURS.)
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To: oldbrowser

Wrong uprising. You’re probably thinking about the Paris Commune uprising during the Franco-Prussian War. And that didn’t actually occur until after France had lost the war. The uprising in Les Miserables is an unrelated event that took place in 1832.


17 posted on 12/30/2012 10:07:05 PM PST by JerseyanExile
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To: JerseyanExile
Wrong uprising.

Thanks, that has always been a source of confusion.

18 posted on 12/31/2012 6:30:27 AM PST by oldbrowser (They are marxists, don't call them democrats)
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To: AdmSmith; AnonymousConservative; Berosus; bigheadfred; Bockscar; ColdOne; Convert from ECUSA; ...

Thanks Bratch.
The groundbreaking new film adaptation of the Broadway musical "Les Misérables" features desperate people suffering under soul-shattering unemployment, naive university students decrying the rich and stoking the flames of socialist revolution, unyielding government official interested not in right and wrong but in following his government's rules and one heroic individual who follows his faith in God to guide him from one success to another all the while truly helping others by using his own private wealth rather than through the ineffective and neglectful government.
Just once I wish some playwrite would do something that had some current relevance. ;')


19 posted on 12/31/2012 7:48:55 AM PST by SunkenCiv (Romney would have been worse, if you're a dumb ass.)
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To: newheart
Yes, Inspector Javert represented the law and the social glue which provided whatever stability existed in French society. Yet the author of this article expresses admiration for Valjean, who was a pervert, a thief and a guy who swam in raw sewage.

Toward the end of the novel, Javert chose death by suicide as preferable to having to face any more of Valjean's abominations. The sewage swim was probably the straw that broke the camel's back and represented the death of civilization. What was there left for Javert to live for?

20 posted on 12/31/2012 8:22:57 AM PST by Tau Food (Never give a sword to a man who can't dance.)
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To: Tau Food
Yet the author of this article expresses admiration for Valjean, who was a pervert, a thief and a guy who swam in raw sewage.

He was also someone who recognized the depth of his own sin, his need for forgiveness and grace. The movie does not sufficiently record, as does the book, the ongoing dilemma of being a fallen human being, prone to sin, regardless of his repeated efforts to establish a new and reputable life.

Javert chose death by suicide as preferable to having to face any more of Valjean's abominations.

Javert is like the older brother in Jesus' parable of the prodigal son, angry that his reprobate younger brother is welcomed back into the family by his father. Javert knew only the justice of God, and little of his mercy. He could not understand how Valjean, the one you describe as "a pervert, a thief and a guy who swam in raw sewage," could prosper under a just God. But Valjean knew who he was and despite repeated failures, at heart he humbly accepted Christ's sacrifice on the Cross as the payment for his own sin.

Swimming in raw sewage is an apt metaphor for humanity. As the apostle Paul explained, even the best of what we do is like "filthy rags," and of his own not inconsiderable accomplishments as one who faithfully served The Law, he considered it all "dung" (Phil 3:8).

Javert could not bring himself to accept that same grace, because he saw himself as righteous through the performance of his duties under the law. And when he did recognize his failure on this account, he could only imagine death and shame as the only outcome. That is the mindset of the Pharisee. It is extraordinarily bleak and it is a only a pale, bloodless imitation of God's true justice. It may well be, as you put it "the social glue which provided whatever stability existed in French society," but it is not a glue that will hold for eternity.

The Law brings death and the Spirit brings life. (2 Cor 3:6)The same grace granted to Valjean was available to Javert (as it is available to all of us), and had he accepted that, he would have most certainly had much to live for.

21 posted on 12/31/2012 10:57:47 AM PST by newheart (The greatest trick the left ever pulled was convincing the world it was not a religion.)
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To: newheart
Re: your response -

Not bad, not bad at all. You seem to have a knack for this sort of thing.

I enjoyed the movie. ;-)

22 posted on 12/31/2012 1:13:06 PM PST by Tau Food (Never give a sword to a man who can't dance.)
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To: Tau Food
Not bad, not bad at all.

Thx. I do get wound up sometimes. ;-)

23 posted on 01/01/2013 8:18:33 AM PST by newheart (The greatest trick the left ever pulled was convincing the world it was not a religion.)
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To: Tau Food
Not bad, not bad at all.

Thx. I do get wound up sometimes. ;-)

24 posted on 01/01/2013 8:18:42 AM PST by newheart (The greatest trick the left ever pulled was convincing the world it was not a religion.)
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To: newheart

Well, i’m proud to have been able to provoke you. ;-)


25 posted on 01/01/2013 8:26:12 AM PST by Tau Food (Never give a sword to a man who can't dance.)
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To: Bratch

I absolutely hated this movie. Looooooooooooong and depressing.


26 posted on 01/01/2013 8:32:39 AM PST by Private_Sector_Does_It_Better (I AM ANDREW BREITBART)
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To: Bratch
Best review I've seen:


27 posted on 01/01/2013 9:18:05 AM PST by FreedomPoster (Islam delenda est)
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