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Long term care for a senior citizen?

Posted on 01/12/2013 11:22:50 AM PST by LouAvul

Hypothetical.

Scenario: If a senior citizen becomes physically incapacitated, but reasonably mentally alert, and it is impractical for her to move in with family. Her sole support is social security at approximately $2000 month.

Are there any options in terms of assisted living? Other retirement facilities?

Also, what if she's not physically incapacitated, but simply is unable to live alone?

I'm sure many of you have addressed or, at least, investigated such events.

thank you


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1 posted on 01/12/2013 11:22:53 AM PST by LouAvul
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To: LouAvul

Might find someone willing to live with parent in exchange for room and board and small stipend. Would probably need to arrange for this person to have some time off once in awhile.


2 posted on 01/12/2013 11:31:35 AM PST by Mother Mary
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To: LouAvul

Look into Affordable Assisted Living in her area. Also Medicaid Home Health Care. Both are programs aimed at keeping people out of the nursing home.


3 posted on 01/12/2013 11:35:31 AM PST by iowamark
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To: LouAvul

Yes there are assisted living places for people who are getting old but still not incapacitated. I used to work with a really nice old guy and noticed he is now in one of those places.

He can come and go as he wants but they have facilities to assist them such as nursing care.

If a person is in that shape and has family it is probably best if they live with their kin. My Daughter and her family have their 88 year old Maternal Grandfather living with them. He doesn’t go out much at all but is not incapacitated.

I hated to put Mother in a nursing home but she could not get around at all, not with a walker and not able to get into a wheel chair on her own. We visited her daily but I could tell she hated being in that situation as her mind was still sharp.


4 posted on 01/12/2013 11:35:44 AM PST by yarddog (One shot one miss.)
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To: LouAvul

Check the web for senior programs and support in her area.

Some my be government supported. Others may be private.


5 posted on 01/12/2013 11:42:41 AM PST by TomGuy
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To: LouAvul

The best bet, lowest prices with best care, would be in one of the growing retirement and nursing home enclaves in northern Mexico.

http://usatoday30.usatoday.com/news/nation/2007-08-15-mexnursinghome_N.htm

http://www.azcentral.com/business/consumer/articles/0816nursinghomes0816.html


6 posted on 01/12/2013 11:49:01 AM PST by yefragetuwrabrumuy (Best WoT news at rantburg.com)
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To: LouAvul

If she isn’t physically incapacitated but unable to live alone, assisted living is the way to go. It was running about $2500/month but included all meals (at least we knew she was getting balanced meals), laundry service, bathing, room cleaning, activities and the distribution of her medication. I think it was a little extra to have her hair done weekly but they did free manicures every week.

You’d have to check the ones in your area but the one we went with really wasn’t equipped to deal with someone physically incapacitated.


7 posted on 01/12/2013 11:57:19 AM PST by nodumbblonde ("I'm all for helping the helpless, but I don't give a rat's a** about the clueless." - Dennis Miller)
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To: LouAvul

Does she own her own home? My son-in-law is struggling with this right now. His problem is that the family home is unsaleable in the present condition and the mother is uncooperative. To make matters worse, my son-in-law has a schizophrenic older brother, who has been taking responsibility for the mother, but threatening to kill her at the same time.


8 posted on 01/12/2013 11:58:01 AM PST by Eva
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To: LouAvul

Does she own her own home? My son-in-law is struggling with this right now. His problem is that the family home is unsaleable in the present condition and the mother is uncooperative. To make matters worse, my son-in-law has a schizophrenic older brother, who has been taking responsibility for the mother, but threatening to kill her at the same time.


9 posted on 01/12/2013 11:58:15 AM PST by Eva
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To: LouAvul

Try this scenario:

61 year old disabled woman (ambulatory, but doesn’t get around too well), she is single, a real bitch and family doesn’t want anything to do with her. Her brain is addled to many years of drug abuse. Her income is now anly a few hudred $/month. Her 20 year live-in boyfriend, who had a few thousand $ income finally died do to a drug overdose. She isn’t capable of managing her day to day life, even if she had money.

What happens to her now? Live under a bridge? Homeless shelters? Does she have any options?


10 posted on 01/12/2013 12:01:12 PM PST by umgud (as a daughter)
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To: LouAvul

Does your mother belong to a church? Methodist homes are excellent with different levels of care. Some even have cottages instead of the dormitory type rooms.


11 posted on 01/12/2013 12:01:21 PM PST by Eva
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To: LouAvul

I’ve looked into senior care with the help of an attorney. It isn’t pretty.

First of all, medicare is of no help unless it’s short term and the person is expected to get better.

Private care unless the policy was bought decades ago will cost 6 to 8K a month, depending where you live.

State care (Medicaid) is available, but only after you have spent your resources down to nothing. That included your spouses resources as well if there is a spouse in the picture.


12 posted on 01/12/2013 12:07:50 PM PST by babygene ( .)
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To: umgud

” Does she have any options?”

Yes, for her it’s simple. Apply for Medicaid and they will cover it. Medicaid is a problem only if there’s an estate.


13 posted on 01/12/2013 12:11:39 PM PST by babygene ( .)
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To: LouAvul

There are a lot of nursing facilities that can help. Many are not just for Alzheimer’s folks. I would check out the local facilities. Ask local friends—you will pretty quickly which ones are good.

But bone up on your state Medicare rules. You are about to enter a complicated world.


14 posted on 01/12/2013 12:26:27 PM PST by Vermont Lt (We are so screwed.)
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To: LouAvul

bfl


15 posted on 01/12/2013 12:27:36 PM PST by RoosterRedux (The 2nd Amendment is our defense against tyranny.)
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To: LouAvul

Assisted living is terrific if you live in an area where it isn’t exorbitant. My 94 year old mother is at a Sunrise facility(MA) which can be found all over. The place is lovely, the staff is wonderful, the food is awful and it’s costing over $5,000 a month. The rate goes up every January and except for a reasonably nice room It’s not worth it. My late father-in-law was in a fabulous facility, in Georgia, for a third the cost.


16 posted on 01/12/2013 12:28:41 PM PST by surrey
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To: babygene

That’s why many people use a family trust - you don’t have to ‘spend down’ assets. There’s a five year look-back for medicaid though, so prior planning is a necessity.


17 posted on 01/12/2013 12:39:46 PM PST by GreyHoundSailor
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To: surrey

My mother in law was kicked out of a sunrise facility in MA!


18 posted on 01/12/2013 12:55:00 PM PST by Andy'smom
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To: LouAvul
Talk to friends, neighbors, co-workers and relatives who have experienced similar milestones. Also check with professionals who are familiar with and can offer suggestions about local options to explore (and definitely explore!).

As for my mom, I checked with these folks and found them eager and sincere with their advice a couple of years ago. . .A Place for Mom.

Unfortunately, circumstances changed, and I didn't use their placement assistance but they followed up in a professional manner which I found impressive.

Circumstances changed because mom was hospitalized for an injury from a fall, then transferred to rehab. It all happened very quickly.

Note: Once in the system, time is of the essence and your best option is to be prepared with your desired options picked out ahead of time because the hospital operates as a business at that point, turning over room availability ASAP.

In our circumstance, mom didn't want to make waves and accepted the hospital's choice of rehab placement against my wishes. Within 24 hours of transfer she was returned to the ER with a C-diff infection and almost died. The rehab ctr. the hospital discharged mom to had several red flags posted online, but I wasn't authorized to reject the placement. Get all your ducks in line and make sure you and mom are on the same page.

When searching options, keep an open mind, trust but verify - do multiple checks on any location you consider to determine what works for you and yours while time is on your side.

Beyond that, Lord only knows how ObamaCare is going to impact these decisions. Sigh.

19 posted on 01/12/2013 1:01:09 PM PST by wtd
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To: LouAvul

I have a similar situation. So, I moved my mother in my house. She has 36,000 year income, but still trying to sell her home in Wisconsin one year later. When she had her daughters (my sisters) help her, they helped her alright - numerous credit card transactions to the tune of 16,000 of unsecured debt. Swear words cannot cover the crap that i have had to untangle. A year later I just got all th late payments and everything under control. Consolidation loan not possible ruined credit rating. Cannot get Medicaid for her yet. I get respite care services that comes out of her income. The oddity is my mother gave in excess of 2400.00 a month to her church 700 club and other christian organizations for so many years. savings wiped out and striving to9 get more debts paid out and paid down. Who knew taking care of a parent with severe arthritis and severe alzheimers would be a horror story. For 17 years I took care of my mother medical appointments and getting money into a savings, investments wiped out in 2008. For six months, I had to recuperate from 3 surgeries (complications arose requiring 2 additional surgeries)and during that time sisters ran up the account. Now I am the bad guy - nothing to church, nothing to charities and so forth. Being power of finances is a living hell when undoing garbage others did. Best thing I did was close the account in her state, new account established in other state she now lives in and able to get everything closer to manageable.The debts are now being reduced smaller ones paid first than the middle sized than the big ones last also look at the interest rate of cards. this is what kills he elderly credit cards.


20 posted on 01/12/2013 1:01:51 PM PST by hondact200 (Candor dat viribos alas (sincerity gives wings to strength) and Nil desperandum (never despair))
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To: LouAvul
What is your relationship to this woman? Is it your mom?

I changed my entire life so that I could look after my elderly parents (moved and change jobs so I could work out of the house). My dad passed away last July and I would say, in retrospect, looking after him in his last years (12 years to be precise) was one of the best things I have ever done (for me and for him and my mother). I still look after my mother.

As an aside, in the months before my dad died, he asked me one day "why are you so good to me...why are you taking care of me?" I asked him, "would you have done it for me if the tables were turned?" He said "of course."

"Well, Pop, that's why I am doing it for you...I simply want to."

Since he passed away, I have not had one moment of regret or remorse. He is a devout Christian and I know he is having a wonderful time in an unimaginably wonderful place.

21 posted on 01/12/2013 1:04:15 PM PST by RoosterRedux (The 2nd Amendment is our defense against tyranny.)
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To: LouAvul

Unfortunately we’ve had this scenario a few times.

My MIL moved in with us when my FIL passed away (we put an addition on our home, and it worked fine.) However, there came a point when she didn’t want to be left alone, even though her health was good, it was more of a psychological need. At that point it was not practical or possible for us to be home all the time. We found a wonderful retirement complex that did not require a buy in but payment was more like “rent”, month to month. It wasn’t far from our home (about 15 minutes) and there were people available to help 24/7 including medical personnel (that made her feel “safe.”)

It wasn’t cheap, but absolutely everything was included in the cost (meals, suite of rooms, waterfront view, utilities, phone, maid service, transportation and so many amenities were located in the building it was the perfect solution.

There were three levels of care at the facility. Independent, an assisted living area for those needing more help, and a nursing home. Also an on call dr. in the building and a nursing staff. A bank, post office, gym, library, mini theater, daily boat rides or fishing trips (it was on the water) and a gorgeous view.

Here’s a link to the facility we used but at the top there’s a link to other facilities owned by this corporation in other parts of the country.
http://www.watermarkcommunities.com/BocaCiegaBay/

We recently investigated it for another family member, who’s living alone, and doesn’t want to move in with his kids, and when we counted his home insurance, taxes, upkeep, cable, food, cleaning,car expenses, etc. the cost was not that far off. The cost was around $1800/month, if I remember correctly. Here again, there’s money that would have to be spent down, and why not live someplace pleasant with lots of interaction and activities.

My mom was very sick for the last 18 months of her life, our only option was a specialty nursing facility or round the clock at home nursing care. Since she had retirement money to pay down, she wouldn’t have qualified for Medicaid. The retirement funds were in her name and would have been subject to pay down. What I found out at that time, if you’re having to pay down funds, nursing homes are %6-8K per month, at home 24/7 nursing care was cheaper by a couple thousand a month...$1100 per week.

Hope you find a suitable solution for your situation. Many of us are having to face these choices having to do with elder care. They call us the “sandwich” generation...kids on one side, elderly parents on the other, and us in between. Sometimes we felt more like a panini, than an ordinary sandwich. :)


22 posted on 01/12/2013 1:35:57 PM PST by memyselfandi59
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To: Andy'smom

My mother has come close because of her lousy attitude. She likes the staff but can’t stand the residents. She’s originally from NY and thinks the people here is MA. are a bunch of no nothings. She’s extremely conservative and hates that so few of the people around her are either liberal or have no clue.


23 posted on 01/12/2013 2:06:05 PM PST by surrey
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To: surrey

That’s funny - my MIL was from NY, too. Very mouthy, except she was an uber Democrat.

She was actually kicked out of 3 different places that I recall. And the facilities always keep your deposit even if the person has only been there a couple of weeks!


24 posted on 01/12/2013 3:07:02 PM PST by Andy'smom
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To: GreyHoundSailor

For the purposes of Medicaid, the house doesn’t count as an asset as long as you (or your spouse) live in it. One car doesn’t count, and an IRA also doesn’t count except for distributions.


25 posted on 01/12/2013 3:31:11 PM PST by babygene ( .)
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To: memyselfandi59

“Since she had retirement money to pay down, she wouldn’t have qualified for Medicaid.”

Retirement money, if it’s in the form of an IRA doesn’t count as an asset for Medicaid. Only the distribution counts, and and if that doesn’t surpass the 2K asset rule you would be OK. You must however be taking a minimum distribution. SS payments do count as do other assets. Your house and car don’t count if your living in it.

My spouse is on Medicaid and has an IRA.


26 posted on 01/12/2013 4:29:29 PM PST by babygene ( .)
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To: LouAvul

Find room to take care of your eldery people. Pool your resources and open your hearts. Keep them out of deathcare. They belong to you. You will not be sorry.


27 posted on 01/12/2013 8:21:18 PM PST by SaraJohnson
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To: LouAvul

Find room to take care of your elderly people. Pool your resources and open your hearts. Keep them out of deathcare. They belong to you. You will not be sorry.


28 posted on 01/12/2013 8:23:05 PM PST by SaraJohnson
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To: babygene

Very true, but once the owner and spouse have passed on, Medicaid can direct the house be sold and proceeds cover the costs while one/both were alive receiving benefits. Transferring a house to a family trust prevents that while allowing the owner and/or spouse to live in it for their lifetime.


29 posted on 01/13/2013 11:12:32 PM PST by GreyHoundSailor
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