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Insurance question (vanity)
1/14/2013 | edcoil

Posted on 01/14/2013 6:04:28 AM PST by edcoil

My company will not allow me to opt out of its insurance plan. I have looked into getting my own and it would be half what I have to pay for the company's plan.

I don't see where that is right or even legal to burden me with the additional costs - if I can find less expensive insurance I should be able to get it.

Anyone else in this position and anyone know short of suing or leaving what my option are? Thanks.


TOPICS: Business/Economy
KEYWORDS:

1 posted on 01/14/2013 6:04:33 AM PST by edcoil
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To: edcoil
The reason the company won't let you opt out is someone in the company is probably getting a huge kick-back.
Best advice I can give is contact a lawyer.
2 posted on 01/14/2013 6:10:37 AM PST by oh8eleven (RVN '67-'68)
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To: edcoil

You would be able only to opt in or out during open enrollment.
We chose not to have my husband’s company insurance this year, opted out during open enrollment but in order to make that move we had to prove we had health insurance somewhere else.
They explained because of obamaCare the employee must have insurance, the company has to prove to the feds everyone is covered or face huge fines.


3 posted on 01/14/2013 6:11:00 AM PST by svcw (Why is one cell on another planet considered life, and in the womb it is not.)
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To: edcoil

It may depend on your state regulations.

Also, you may find cheaper independent insurance, but I would bet the coverage is vastly lesser that the company plan.


4 posted on 01/14/2013 6:11:43 AM PST by TomGuy
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To: edcoil

http://www.cbsnews.com/8301-505125_162-57350864/can-my-company-force-me-to-take-health-insurance/


5 posted on 01/14/2013 6:14:47 AM PST by mnehring
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To: edcoil

edcoil,

The answer is it depends... If you were in Texas that answer would be no. However, states like Hawaii have some funky insurance rules. My SO is an insurance consultant that designs plans for companies and bids them. If you can give me some more info she can find out. She needs what state is this in, is this a new job? How long have you been employed if not a new job and any union involved in this?

Syn


6 posted on 01/14/2013 6:16:37 AM PST by Syntyr (Happiness is two at low eight!)
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To: edcoil

Hemmer on FoxNews just had a report from Stuart Varney that health premiums are going up about 50%.

At the conclusion of the report, Hemmer says that Obama promised that premiums would go down:

“It wasn’t supposed to be this way!”

==

Duh!


7 posted on 01/14/2013 6:16:58 AM PST by TomGuy
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To: edcoil

If I remember correctly, Obamacare mandates that if your employer offers insurance, you must enroll.


8 posted on 01/14/2013 6:19:49 AM PST by raisincane (November 6, 2012 - I'm announcing my retirement at work; becoming a taker.)
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To: oh8eleven

Is this a very small company?

If you have a half-dozen employees and the youngest/healthiest declines coverage, that is gonna kick the curve up on rates very substantially for the remainder.

Legally I don’t think they can stop you from dropping coverage, but certainly that could cause them to kick and scream a lot.


9 posted on 01/14/2013 6:29:33 AM PST by Buckeye McFrog
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To: TomGuy; edcoil

I’ve seen cheaper rates for independent insurance during the quoting process. Once you apply and they look at your medical records the rates usually go up fast.


10 posted on 01/14/2013 6:32:26 AM PST by driftdiver (I could eat it raw, but why do that when I have a fire.)
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To: Buckeye McFrog

Legally they just make it a condition of employment.


11 posted on 01/14/2013 6:35:26 AM PST by driftdiver (I could eat it raw, but why do that when I have a fire.)
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To: driftdiver


That, or the policy coverage is weak.

In the mid 90s I took out a low-premium policy. When did start to use it for some health concerns, I read the fine print.

Their maximum payout in a year was about what I had paid in premiums. Anything over their low payout amounts 'exceeded' the coverage and came out of MY pocket. So, basically, they were worthless.
12 posted on 01/14/2013 6:51:50 AM PST by TomGuy
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To: edcoil

You are probably young, single, and healthy, which therefore means that you are expected to incur lower health costs and thereby subsidize the costs of health care for other employees. The employer is probably required to include you due to the terms of its group insurance contract.


13 posted on 01/14/2013 6:54:28 AM PST by Rockingham
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To: edcoil

I find it hard to believe you can get insurance at half the cost. Normally single coverage is much higher than group coverage. Are you sure you got a real quote and are not just looking at an advertised price? The real quotes are often double what they advertise as their rate.


14 posted on 01/14/2013 6:55:53 AM PST by Kirkwood (Zombie Hunter)
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To: driftdiver

That has been my experience, too.


15 posted on 01/14/2013 7:03:58 AM PST by KYGrandma (The sun shines bright on my old Kentucky home.....)
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To: edcoil

I’m thinking most employers would be eager to trim costs. Why not push the issue up the chain of command? If the deal you found is legit, it may benifit the company as a whole to switch providers.

On a side note, my mother opted out of employer provided health insurance and was paid the extra amount (not sure if it was 100%) of what the employer didn’t pay in premiums for her.


16 posted on 01/14/2013 7:24:10 AM PST by WinMod70
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To: TomGuy

Two years ago I spent Christmas in intensive care with a guy who had similar insurance. His maximum coverage for hospitalization was $10,000.

Don’t know what his bill totaled but mine was around $184k.


17 posted on 01/14/2013 7:24:45 AM PST by driftdiver (I could eat it raw, but why do that when I have a fire.)
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To: TomGuy
And health insurance also includes Long Term Medical Insurance. . .you know, the insurance you buy to help cover your care in assisted living.

My mother-in-law is in an extensive care facility and might be soon going to assisted living. We just received in the mail a notice that her premiums are going up 25%. No increase in coverage, no other changes. . .just an increase in the premium. Spoke with a lady working with the insurance company and she says this is the result of “free” obamacare, and some people called and cancelled and instead will go “on the dole” if long term care is necessary because they can’t afford the increase.

This whole obamacare thing is a deliberate plan to force everyone into government”care” as a way to control the people. Government decides who to cover and denies care to trouble-makers.

18 posted on 01/14/2013 8:45:27 AM PST by Hulka
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To: edcoil
First off, did you see the law or company policy that said you cannot opt out, or were you just verbally told you couldn’t by someone in human resources?
19 posted on 01/14/2013 8:57:12 AM PST by MamaTexan (To follow Original Constitutional Intent, one MUST acknowledge the Right of secession)
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To: edcoil

All of the above. Group coverage almost always is a better deal, despite contrary claims.

Plus—something not yet mentioned—I think you may want to avoid angering your employer in this very difficult job market. It might put you on the short list of people to be let go if cuts are needed.


20 posted on 01/14/2013 9:02:44 AM PST by Cicero (Marcus Tullius)
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To: edcoil

Be careful to review the policies carefully. There are some policies that are not “insurance” but rather an indemnity policy. This means that there is a set amount that they will pay you for specific occurrences. For example, they may pay up to $XXX per day for hospitalization. This is different than paying X% of your hospitalization charges. Or, they may have set values for certain surgeries or procedures. These policies have strict limits on total payouts also. Mega Life is one of the companies I have seen pedaling these policies in the past. I agree with other comments, group policies are usually much richer than individual policies.


21 posted on 01/14/2013 9:13:41 AM PST by Honor above all (I'm only here to help.)
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