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Read Shakespeare, Wordsworth to boost brain
ANI | | Jan 14, 2013, 01.25 PM IST

Posted on 01/14/2013 5:37:15 PM PST by BenLurkin

The works of Shakespeare and Wordsworth are "rocket-boosters" to the brain and better therapy than self-help books, researchers have claimed.

Scientists, psychologists and English academics at Liverpool University have found that reading the works of the Bard and other classical writers has a beneficial effect on the mind, catches the reader's attention and triggers moments of self-reflection, the Telegraph reported.

Using scanners, they monitored the brain activity of volunteers as they read works by William ShakespeareWilliam Wordsworth, T.S Eliot and others.

They then "translated" the texts into more "straightforward", modern language and again monitored the readers' brains as they read the words.

Scans showed that the more "challenging" prose and poetry set off far more electrical activity in the brain than the more pedestrian versions.

Scientists were able to study the brain activity as it responded to each word and record how it "lit up" as the readers encountered unusual words, surprising phrases or difficult sentence structure.

This "lighting up" of the mind lasts longer than the initial electrical spark, shifting the brain to a higher gear, encouraging further reading.


TOPICS: Books/Literature
KEYWORDS: epigraphyandlanguage; pages; shakespeare; wordsworth

1 posted on 01/14/2013 5:37:19 PM PST by BenLurkin
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To: BenLurkin

I would personally recommend the works of Edmund Spenser, which will not only exercise your brain but teach you how to be a brave and honorable knight. What more could you want, nowadays?


2 posted on 01/14/2013 5:39:50 PM PST by proxy_user
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To: BenLurkin

Is there a link to this article?


3 posted on 01/14/2013 5:47:44 PM PST by afraidfortherepublic
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To: BenLurkin

Edmund Burke and Adam Smith work very well.

However I do think the poetic has muscle matter exercise that is wonderful.


4 posted on 01/14/2013 5:52:38 PM PST by KC Burke (Plain Conservative opinions and common sense correction for thirteen years. RSC)
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To: BenLurkin

That is the reason those authors/materials are known as The Classics.

Those who fail to study the classics turn into low information voters.


5 posted on 01/14/2013 6:00:54 PM PST by TomGuy
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To: BenLurkin
Read him. I dare ya. Sesquipedalian and eqally pleonastic.


6 posted on 01/14/2013 6:03:48 PM PST by Daffynition (Self-respect: the secure feeling that no one, as yet, is suspicious. ~ HLM)
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To: BenLurkin
Read The Book Named the Governor by Thomas Elyot (London: Berthelet, 1531), which suggests a curriculum for developing a Renaissance man.
7 posted on 01/14/2013 6:14:04 PM PST by Fiji Hill (Io Triumphe!)
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To: afraidfortherepublic

http://timesofindia.indiatimes.com/life-style/books/Read-Shakespeare-Wordsworth-to-boost-brain/articleshow/18017853.cms


8 posted on 01/14/2013 6:39:56 PM PST by BenLurkin (This is not a statement of fact. It is either opinion or satire; or both)
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To: Daffynition

I used to keep a notebook listing the new words I learned watching Firing line and would practice them by pretending to debate Mr.Buckley.

Sesquipedalian was one of my favorite words, followed by the phrase sonorously bromide, for no particular reason, just because.


9 posted on 01/14/2013 6:40:22 PM PST by notted (autodidactic)
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To: BenLurkin

I can believe this. You truly have to THINK when reading Shakespeare!


10 posted on 01/14/2013 8:13:17 PM PST by SuziQ
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To: notted

Telegram to WFB from the editors of the Encyclopaedia Britannica:

“Dear Bill, just what the hell does `immanentize the eschaton’ mean?”

;^)


11 posted on 01/14/2013 8:41:13 PM PST by elcid1970 ("The Second Amendment is more important than Islam.")
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To: BenLurkin

Being cultured does not mean to read in order to boost your brain rocket, or however you put it. Our thirst for knowledge and preference for higher forms of entertainment is not pragmatic nor instrumental. It isn’t disinterested, either. But show me a person who goes to Shakespeare like others take gingko biloba and I will show you someone who won’t end up reading much, let alone understanding.


12 posted on 01/14/2013 8:56:43 PM PST by Tublecane
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To: elcid1970

Edward de Vere to Encyclopedia Britannica... my dear perfidious albion,

My conscience hath a thousand several tongues,
And every tongue brings in a several tale,
And every tale condemns me for a villain.

or something to that effect ;-)


13 posted on 01/14/2013 9:03:35 PM PST by notted (autodidactic)
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To: elcid1970

The “eschaton” is the end times. “Immanence” is God’s real presence in this world. To immanentize the eschaton is to bring about the end times in the here and now.

It is most aptly applied to millenarians, like the heretics of the Middle Ages described in Norman Cohn’s “The Pursuit of the Millenium.” The phrase was popularized by conservative American philosopher Eric Voegelin in books like “The New Science of Politics.” He sees gnostics (or “knowers,” meaning those aware of God’s presence in the world, and as opposed to agnostics) as forerunners of modern utopian revolutionaries, for instance Marx.


14 posted on 01/14/2013 9:07:09 PM PST by Tublecane
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To: notted

I recall cutting my teeth on the notion of Conservitism and watching Firing Line with a legal pad ‘n pen writing down the words I had NEVER heard used before. Then I had to look up the words in a dictionary [gasp!]....which were often spelled incorrectly, which made it doubly hard. LOL

WFB was exciting and fun to watch him slice and dice Gore Vidal to ribbons. He and Bill Safire are missed. Greatly missed.


15 posted on 01/14/2013 10:51:18 PM PST by Daffynition (Self-respect: the secure feeling that no one, as yet, is suspicious. ~ HLM)
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To: BenLurkin

Thanks. I’m sending this to my 99 year old mom — big Shakespeare fan.


16 posted on 01/15/2013 2:08:13 AM PST by afraidfortherepublic
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To: BenLurkin

Thanks. I’m sending this to my 99 year old mom — big Shakespeare fan.


17 posted on 01/15/2013 2:08:13 AM PST by afraidfortherepublic
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To: Daffynition

As a yewt, I fancied myself as a liberal before I understood what a classic liberal was and I thought the show was fixed, because whenever WFB debated some duffus on TV who represented the left, I figured that he chose the worst representative to debate just to make himself look good. Little did I know he was actually winning me over and converting me to conservatism.


18 posted on 01/15/2013 6:48:38 AM PST by notted (autodidactic)
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To: TomGuy

I heard G. Gordon Liddy tell someone who wanted to become more intelligent without going to college, what books he recommended. He said the best investment would be to read The Harvard Classics. I found a complete set at an antique store and am progressing through them. Albeit, slowly.


19 posted on 01/15/2013 6:58:31 AM PST by KYGrandma (The sun shines bright on my old Kentucky home.....)
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To: notted
Buckley was the *real deal* through and through.

As a product of a Parochial school education, my *mush* brain was filled with do-good social causes to promote and support. In undergrad school, we attended lectures by Ceasar Chavez, and I was so moved by the plight of the migrant worker. But none of it seemed right in my head. Then along can Barry Goldwater and WFB, and I was swayed by their speeches and writings. On my meager savings, as most broke college students, I scrapped enough together to subscribe to the National Review. Then a light went on, I recall attending a series of debates between the incredible Rev Billy Graham and radical Mario Savio [Berkeley Free Speech Movement] at MIT....Rev. Graham chewing Savio up and spit him out. That was the end of liberalism for me. And I'll bet I was the only *Goldwater Girl* handing out campaign literature on the liberal streets of Boston.

I am grateful for the strong classical education of the Sisters of Notre Dame and Jesuits. Fortunately, they and my parents, taught us to *think*. ;)

20 posted on 01/15/2013 9:12:10 AM PST by Daffynition (The essential American soul is hard, isolate, stoic, and a killer. It has never yet melted. — D.H.)
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To: KYGrandma
Most excellent project!

We were educated with the *Great books*, which is similar in scope.

I feel badly for the kids today and the crap they are assigned to digest.

21 posted on 01/15/2013 9:20:37 AM PST by Daffynition (The essential American soul is hard, isolate, stoic, and a killer. It has never yet melted. — D.H.)
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