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I want to start with 9mm Luger for my Glock 19 and then .380 Auto for my Ruger LCP.

If your advice is "Don't even think about, idiot." don't hesitate to say so.

1 posted on 02/03/2013 10:35:09 AM PST by BuckeyeTexan
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To: humblegunner; NYTexan; mylife; Eaker; Lazamataz

Ping.


2 posted on 02/03/2013 10:36:55 AM PST by BuckeyeTexan (There are those that break and bend. I'm the other kind.)
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To: BuckeyeTexan

Start here!

http://ingunowners.com/forums/ammunition_and_reloading/77404-so_you_want_to_reload_but_you_don_t_know_where_to_begin.html


3 posted on 02/03/2013 10:40:24 AM PST by sonofagun (Some think my cynicism grows with age. I like to think of it as wisdom!)
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To: BuckeyeTexan

Look at the ammo. It should look good almost as good as new.

If the loader listed the load data check it out and see how it agrees with a loading manual. If he doesn’t list the load, I would be inclined to reject it.

If you know who loaded it, just how much do you trust hims?

Learning to load is not very difficult but you do need to be careful.


4 posted on 02/03/2013 10:42:38 AM PST by yarddog (One shot one miss.)
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To: BuckeyeTexan

1st, remember that Glock has different cut rifling and clearly state to owners not to use reloaded ammo. The consensus, however, is that as long as you just reload jacketed bullets, you’ll be OK.


5 posted on 02/03/2013 10:43:59 AM PST by umgud
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To: BuckeyeTexan
Most if not all semi auto mfgrs say that shooting reloads will void your warranty.
That said, except for my 22 I reload every thing I shoot. 9mm, 38 spec, 357 mag, 40S&W, 45 ACP and 45 Colt.

Properly cleaning and inspecting the cases before loading, then paying close attention to weights, length and crimp are the key. Done right, reloads are as good and in some cases better than factory.
Reloading your own lets you adjust powder charge and bullet weight to suit you.
Heck yes invest in reloading equipt and go for it. There are several books available to teach you the dos and don’ts.
ABCs of Reloading is pretty darn good.

As I type this, I am cleaning brass to reload later this afternoon.

6 posted on 02/03/2013 10:46:13 AM PST by Tupelo (Hunkered down & loading up)
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To: BuckeyeTexan
For bulk reloads, make sure all the brass is the same. Mixed headstamps gives mixed results.
7 posted on 02/03/2013 10:49:53 AM PST by MileHi ( "It's coming down to patriots vs the politicians." - ovrtaxt)
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To: BuckeyeTexan

First off, I don’t ever buy ammo someone I don’t know and trust has reloaded. It’s too risky.

A good beginners kit is sold by RCBS. It comes with a nice single stage press that I’ve been using for more than 10 years. A scale, powder throw, and case trimmer is also included. Get the loading manual published by the bullet manufacturer you intend to use. You will end up with multiple manuals. That’s ok.

A vibratory case cleaner is worth every nickel, too.

Start doing straight wall pistol cases. The calibers you have are examples of that. Break the task into manageable chunks the first few times.

For example:

Inspect once fired cases for defects. This goes for factory new cases, too.
Then clean the cases overnight in your tumbler.

Then decap and resize a few hundred. Take a break.

Most importantly, when you’re reloading that’s ALL you’re doing. Make sure you can concentrate completely. Remember, you’re basically manufacturing small explosive devices that YOU are going to set off in the palm of YOUR hand. LOL. You want to make sure it’s done properly.

Have fun. Be safe.


9 posted on 02/03/2013 10:51:18 AM PST by Lurker (Violence is rarely the answer. But when it is it is the only answer.)
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To: BuckeyeTexan

I do not reload but it is not that hard.
I am guessing that 9mm an .380 would use the same dies.

Wideners is a good reloading source

http://www.wideners.com/


10 posted on 02/03/2013 10:54:11 AM PST by mylife (The Roar Of The Masses Could Be Farts)
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To: Norm Lenhart

Thread for you, dear.


12 posted on 02/03/2013 11:01:04 AM PST by Lazamataz (LAZ'S LAW: As an argument with liberals goes on, the probability of being called racist approaches 1)
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To: BuckeyeTexan
I know precious little about reloading, seriously, but I do know an expert.

Norm Lenhart. He knows EVERYTHING about reloading.

15 posted on 02/03/2013 11:02:49 AM PST by Lazamataz (LAZ'S LAW: As an argument with liberals goes on, the probability of being called racist approaches 1)
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To: BuckeyeTexan

There are so many companies producing excellent presses and accessories. I started back in the late 70’s with a RCBS Rock Chucker press, dies, scale, and all the trimmings. I also bought most of the reloading data books; Lyman, Speer, Hornady, etc... and worked up my loads. I make 20 to a batch and then test them at the range for accuracy.

I keep detailed notes on powder charge, primer mfg and group size. I also keep control of the brass and make sure I have a note card that stays with the cases that lets me know how many times the cases have been fired.

I have since moved up to a Dillon 550 press so I can speed up the process.

For rifle cases I use a full length sizing die and I always buy Carbide dies for my pistol rounds. I pretty much stick with RCBS dies but have a couple sets of Lee dies that work well.

I am very careful with my powder charges/weights and can honestly say I have never had a misfire or dud (I have had a handful of factory ammo misfire) and once I get the right powder charge and bullet combination the accuracy is better than any store bought ammo I have used. Then again, I have never purchased the really expensive match ammo that is out there but I have never felt the need to spend that much cash when the ammo I reload suits me fine.


21 posted on 02/03/2013 11:10:56 AM PST by OldMissileer
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To: BuckeyeTexan

I know the guy that owns probably one of the largest gun stores in the country. His comment about “gun show” ammo: DON’T!!! The majority of people returning to his store asking about warranty repairs and repairs in general have been people that used reloaded ammo.

I reload, but I know me and I know what I do to ensure every single round is perfect as can be, but I still wouldn’t expect you to trust me to make you any ammo. Maybe in some kind of close friendship whereby you see what I do for reloading and you have experience with me shooting my ammo, maybe.

You might find a guy that supplies a lot of ammo but they make ammo with a shoulder shrug if it doesn’t work versus factory ammunition makers that base their entire business on making safe ammo and immediately cease to exist if they make crap ammo.

Even some factories make crap ammo I will not shoot. Some people shoot lots of the stuff and think it is fine, but I’ve had problems that I don’t care to experience with some factory ammo. So even factory ammo should be scrutinized for quality.

Just my 2 cents.


22 posted on 02/03/2013 11:11:40 AM PST by CodeToad (Liberals are bloodsucking ticks. We need to light the matchstick to burn them off.)
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To: BuckeyeTexan

Some 9mm pistols have instructions that warn against extensive firing of unjacketed bullets...something to keep in mind when buying and pricing bullets.

I second what others have said...its scary buying other people’s reloads.


23 posted on 02/03/2013 11:12:49 AM PST by lacrew (Mr. Soetoro, we regret to inform you that your race card is over the credit limit.)
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To: BuckeyeTexan
Buying reloaded ammo is like buying Sushi: It's not how it looks, it's how much you trust the Sushi Chef (or reloader.)

The worse thing that can happen is you get one round with a double charge of powder and your gun goes "boom" when you fire it.

The second worse thing that can happen is you get one round with no power charge, and it goes *pop* when you fire it, and the bullet has just enough oomph to get lodged in the barrel. If you don't realize what happened and shoot again...

So, know thy source of reloaded ammo.

25 posted on 02/03/2013 11:13:44 AM PST by Yo-Yo
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To: BuckeyeTexan

Reloading allows you to shoot more for your money, but don’t expect to break even on your investment for a good while. Also, you can forget about finding all the components you need right now as they are even more scarce than loaded cartridges. Primers are sold out pretty much everywhere.


28 posted on 02/03/2013 11:19:12 AM PST by Sparticus (Tar and feathers for the next dumb@ss Republican that uses the word bipartisanship.)
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To: BuckeyeTexan

Don’t buy reloads from someone you don’t know.

Find a local knowledgeable reloader and ask him to help you get started. Most reloaders love doing that.

Decide how many calibers you want to load. If only 1 and it is simple, you might start with a Lee hand loader. I have used them and they work, with a few cavots.

Start with a single stage press. Lee Classic loaders are pretty decent and inexpensive. (I use a Redding Boss press)

If you shoot tubular magazines or automatics you need to be careful with crimping the brass.

Start with jacketed bullets. Later if you like and are inclined you might think about casting bullets. There is an artform connected to effectively doing that. If you can find a source for cheap wheel weights you can have very good results for many calibers. For anything shooting over 2000 fps, I would not recommend this.


31 posted on 02/03/2013 11:25:40 AM PST by Texas Fossil
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To: BuckeyeTexan

Perhaps you can find a local club that has reloading equipment and folks to teach you.

http://www.majorsgunclub.org/


32 posted on 02/03/2013 11:25:57 AM PST by mylife (The Roar Of The Masses Could Be Farts)
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To: BuckeyeTexan

Check out some of the videos by gavintoobe on youtube, also known as UltimateReloader. I learned almost everything I needed to begin right there:

http://www.youtube.com/user/gavintoobe


33 posted on 02/03/2013 11:26:41 AM PST by Red in Blue PA (When Injustice becomes Law, Resistance Becomes Duty.-Thomas Jefferson)
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To: BuckeyeTexan
I've been shooting and reloading ammo for over 40 years.
Reloading is an enjoyable aspect of the hobby in it's own right. The quality of ammo you can produce can exceed that of “factory” products because you tailor the bullet / load to your firearm / needs.
If you are not a meticulous person and have difficulty paying attention to details, don't even consider reloading.
The question you first have to answer is “how much ammo do you plan to reload”? Are you going to want to reload only for your 9mm, or do you plan on other calibers as well?
At a very minimum you want to invest in a quality reloading manual, an accurate reloading scale, and a quality reloading press / die combination.
If you are only interested in reloading handgun ammunition, I'd highly recommend purchasing a dillon precision square deal B. It comes already adjusted and set up in your preferred caliber, and you can add caliber conversion kits easily. I can't speak highly enough about the quality and customer service dillon provides.
The price of the square deal is actually less than what I've seen for “starter kits” based on quality single stage presses when you factor in the cost of a set of dies and shell holders.
Feel free to PM me should you have any questions or need more info.
34 posted on 02/03/2013 11:26:52 AM PST by bitterohiogunclinger (Proudly casting a heavy carbon footprint as I clean my guns ---)
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To: BuckeyeTexan
A good site with videos.

http://www.midwayusa.com/category/reloading

A few more places to start with

http://reloadbench.com/main.html

http://www.reloadammo.com/

http://www.handloads.com/loaddata/

Utube also has quite few videos that can help you get started

35 posted on 02/03/2013 11:29:39 AM PST by piroque ("In times of universal deceit, telling the truth becomes a revolutionary act")
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