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Rare Roman coin found in Acle only the second of its kind
edp24 ^ | Friday, February 8, 2013 | Lauren Rogers

Posted on 02/09/2013 4:38:46 PM PST by SunkenCiv

An incredibly rare Roman coin discovered in Acle has been donated to Norwich Castle Museum.

The coin -- only the second of its kind known in the world -- was unearthed by Dave Clarke during the Springfield archaeology dig last summer.

Acle Parish Council has sent the ancient artefact to Norwich where it may go on display and will be used by experts to identify and date other coins.

The coin dates from AD 312 when Emperor Constantine I ruled the Roman world. The only other example was found in the 18th Century and is on show in Lisbon.

One side shows the bust of Constantine the Great and the reverse pictures him seated in a chair holding a sceptre...

The picture reveals the exact office Constantine held at the time; the office of the consultate, dating the coin to AD 312. It also carries a mark revealing it was minted in London...

The coin will go on display in the recent finds case at Norwich Castle Museum.

A photograph is on show in the Roman finds cabinet at the Acle Recreation and Social Club.

Another Roman coin found by Dave Clarke at the dig was a copper alloy coin known as a sestertius that depicts Roman emperor usurper Clodius Albinis and dates from AD 194-5. It has been put in the Springfield dig display unit in Acle Library.

(Excerpt) Read more at edp24.co.uk ...


TOPICS: History; Science; Travel
KEYWORDS: acle; ancientrome; clodiusalbinis; clodiusalbinus; coin; constantine; epigraphyandlanguage; godsgravesglyphs; norwich; romanempire; unitedkingdom
The Roman coin donated by Acle Parish Council to Norwich Castle Museum

The Roman coin donated by Acle Parish Council to Norwich Castle Museum

1 posted on 02/09/2013 4:38:52 PM PST by SunkenCiv
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To: Renfield; nickcarraway

 GGG managers are SunkenCiv, StayAt HomeMother & Ernest_at_the_Beach
They must be feelin' [bomp bomp] glad all over.

Just adding to the catalog, not sending a general distribution.

To all -- please ping me to other topics which are appropriate for the GGG list.


2 posted on 02/09/2013 4:40:02 PM PST by SunkenCiv (Romney would have been worse, if you're a dumb ass.)
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To: SunkenCiv

They describe the obverse and the reverse, but only show the obverse. Typical.


3 posted on 02/09/2013 4:42:42 PM PST by null and void (Gun confiscation enables tyranny. Don't enable tyranny.)
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To: SunkenCiv
After he defeated Maxentius in 312 at the battle of the Milvian Bridge, Constantine controlled the western half of the empire, but he was not ruler of the whole empire until 324.

Clodius Albinus is called a usurper because he lost out. Three men were vying for power--Septimius Severus, Clodius Albinus, and Pescennius Niger. Severus formed an alliance with Albinus until he defeated Niger--then he turned against Albinus and defeated him. Severus was a pretty nasty character and probably a lot of Romans would have been happier if Albinus had emerged the winner.

4 posted on 02/09/2013 5:03:32 PM PST by Verginius Rufus
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To: SunkenCiv

A close look at the coin reveals whyat appears to be a mint mark of “S” and the letters “VDB” on the obverse.


5 posted on 02/09/2013 5:19:16 PM PST by 17th Miss Regt
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Freepers, your Contributions make every difference!
Please keep ‘em coming! Thank you all very much!

6 posted on 02/09/2013 5:37:01 PM PST by RedMDer (Support Free Republic)
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To: SunkenCiv

The next coin they find will be in 3987 AD. It will be a copper coin with a bust of the Sultan of Britain, since the Moslems overpopulated all of Europe by the year 3000 AD and exterminated practically everyone else.


7 posted on 02/09/2013 5:38:59 PM PST by bunkerhill7 ("The Second Amendment has no limits on firepower"-NY State Senator Marchione.)
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To: null and void; SunkenCiv
They describe the obverse and the reverse, but only show the obverse. Typical.

I thought they do that on purpose to stop the counterfeiters.

8 posted on 02/09/2013 6:45:22 PM PST by bigheadfred
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To: null and void

They’re typical anti-reversites!


9 posted on 02/09/2013 6:46:49 PM PST by SunkenCiv (Romney would have been worse, if you're a dumb ass.)
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To: 17th Miss Regt
Also, my apologies for not linking to the larger image, which is here (but width-restricted in HTML). A right-click to open in new tab or new window allows a better look for anyone interested. Oh, in fact, I set the link up here so that it will just open in new tab/window by clicking on it.

The Roman coin donated by Acle Parish Council to Norwich Castle Museum

10 posted on 02/09/2013 6:51:01 PM PST by SunkenCiv (Romney would have been worse, if you're a dumb ass.)
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To: SunkenCiv

Gee, an empire that ran on a hard currency, not fiat money. How odd....


11 posted on 02/09/2013 6:55:10 PM PST by central_va (I won't be reconstructed and I do not give a damn.)
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To: bigheadfred

Yup.

And counterfeiting is about as ancient as coin-making.

https://www.google.com/search?q=ancient%20counterfeit%20coins


12 posted on 02/09/2013 6:55:37 PM PST by SunkenCiv (Romney would have been worse, if you're a dumb ass.)
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To: SunkenCiv

How do you counterfeit gold?


13 posted on 02/09/2013 6:57:52 PM PST by central_va (I won't be reconstructed and I do not give a damn.)
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To: SunkenCiv

thanks for doing that. I really appreciate people that go to some extra trouble in order to serve the group


14 posted on 02/09/2013 7:06:59 PM PST by plain talk
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To: Verginius Rufus

It’s interesting to me how the career and denouement of Clodius Albinus (and Magnus Maximus a.k.a. Macsen Wledig, and Carausius...) wound up getting conflated with several of the Arthurian legends, including one (perhaps little known) in which Arthur invaded the continent and never came back.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Septimius_Severus


15 posted on 02/09/2013 7:08:26 PM PST by SunkenCiv (Romney would have been worse, if you're a dumb ass.)
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To: central_va
Actually, central, by the time Constantine became emperor, Roman coinage was "silver washed" copper where it had been almost all silver 300 years earlier.
16 posted on 02/09/2013 7:10:27 PM PST by DeaconBenjamin (A trillion here, a trillion there, soon you're NOT talking real money)
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To: DeaconBenjamin
You can see the green oxidation of copper on the coin.

So as the currency debases the empire declines. We are starting with worthless paper so we are screwed from the get go.

17 posted on 02/09/2013 7:15:04 PM PST by central_va (I won't be reconstructed and I do not give a damn.)
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To: central_va
We started with the Coinage Act of 1792. $10 gold was 247.5 grains of pure gold. $1 silver was 371.25 grains of pure silver. A gram is 15.4 grains.
18 posted on 02/09/2013 7:45:26 PM PST by DeaconBenjamin (A trillion here, a trillion there, soon you're NOT talking real money)
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To: plain talk

My pleasure, and thanks for the kind remarks!


19 posted on 02/09/2013 7:48:30 PM PST by SunkenCiv (Romney would have been worse, if you're a dumb ass.)
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To: DeaconBenjamin

The quote on that image isn’t accurate.

The actual quote is: “The arrogance of officialdom should be tempered and controlled, and assistance to foreign lands should be curtailed, lest Rome fall.”


20 posted on 02/09/2013 7:49:00 PM PST by Netizen (Path to citizenship = Scamnesty. If you give it away, more will come.)
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To: bunkerhill7

And more common still will be the aluminum coins with the bust of the Imam of Washington.


21 posted on 02/09/2013 7:58:14 PM PST by 353FMG ( I refuse to specify whether I am serious or sarcastic -- I respect FReepers too much.)
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To: central_va

Try the link up there, there are lots of surviving examples of ancient counterfeit coins; there’s also been a recent uptick in the modern counterfeiting of ancient coins.

The Roman army was paid in vinegar and salt (the term “salary” comes from “salarium”; still, some claim it means gold), over and above room and board; actual cash was paid after big paydays, such as accompany a successful campaign. The biggest such payday was Trajan’s conquest of Dacia, which is sometimes pointed to as the economic peak of the Roman Empire.

During the near-century of crisis, the various usurpers, claimants, and pretenders pretty consistently used minted coin (or rather, the promise thereof) and pay increases (or rather, the promise thereof) to win support of troops. If they couldn’t come up with it for whatever reason, they tended to have short careers (the predecessor of Septimius Severus mentioned above had that very problem, wound up wondering where his palace staff had suddenly got to, and discovered what he was last to find out as Roman soldiers hacked him to death.

Diocletian ended the crisis by reinstating in-kind pay for the Roman army, wiped out the remaining rival ‘emperors’, divided the Empire, set up a system of succession, stiffened the borders, (re)expanded the Empire here and there, and after more than twenty years of rule, retired and forced his colleague to retire, thus testing his system of succession.

Rome had an understanding of currency that eludes a lot of people today; coin was invented in Lydia, by the King thereof, and it came to replace other systems of trade by providing a common, sanctioned medium of exchange with the imprimatur of the ruler right on it.


22 posted on 02/09/2013 7:58:45 PM PST by SunkenCiv (Romney would have been worse, if you're a dumb ass.)
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To: SunkenCiv

Just imagine the excitement in a few millenia when an archaelogist unearths a trillion dollar platinum kenyan.


23 posted on 02/09/2013 8:05:10 PM PST by Joe 6-pack (Qui me amat, amat et canem meum.)
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To: Joe 6-pack; SunkenCiv
Just imagine the excitement in a few millenia when an archaelogist unearths a trillion dollar platinum kenyan.

Yeah. By then you prolly couldn't stick a shovel in the ground without digging up a handful.

24 posted on 02/09/2013 8:22:32 PM PST by bigheadfred
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To: DeaconBenjamin
It's interesting that the debasement of the silver coins begins already with the Antonines--Antoninus Pius and Marcus Aurelius, considered "Good Emperors." Of course it gets much worse under the Severi and then during the period from 235 to 284 which was marked by frequent civil wars, barbarians invasions, and many short-reigned emperors.

Diocletian tried to stop inflation with his famous Edict of Prices, which had as much impact on prices as Canute's command to the tide not to come in had on the tide.

25 posted on 02/10/2013 1:28:04 PM PST by Verginius Rufus
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To: SunkenCiv
Aristophanes in The Acharnians (425 B.C.) speaks of "counterfeit citizens," a metaphor presupposing that the Athenians hearing the play are familiar with the concept of counterfeit coins.

Diogenes the Cynic is said to have claimed that his father, as mint-master at Sinope, minted counterfeit coins. I have seen some silver coins of Sinope which had the initial letters of Diogenes' father's name on them and there was nothing wrong with them--perhaps he made up that story for its shock value.

26 posted on 02/10/2013 1:37:15 PM PST by Verginius Rufus
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To: Verginius Rufus

So when you debase the coin itself, where does all the silver go?


27 posted on 02/10/2013 1:37:44 PM PST by central_va (I won't be reconstructed and I do not give a damn.)
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To: central_va

It just allows the government to mint more coins while hoping the public doesn’t catch on to the debasement—instead of 1 million denarii, minting 10 million or 100 million.


28 posted on 02/10/2013 8:26:08 PM PST by Verginius Rufus
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