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Woman Enters Wrong Account Number, Loses $42K
Newser ^ | 02/10/2013 | By Neal Colgrass

Posted on 02/11/2013 7:44:58 AM PST by Responsibility2nd

(Newser) – One click on a keyboard, and Sally Donaldson was sending her money to the wrong person. The British hairdresser says she planned to transfer her monthly pay of about $1,500 to her husband's account, but mis-typed one digit of his account number. The heartbreaker: They only noticed the error two years later, after losing $42,000. And the bank, Nationwide, refuses to return the money, the Guardian reports.

The bank argues that the lucky recipient has already withdrawn the money from ATMs, so getting it back is impossible. And the transfers are hardly the bank's fault. "Phone calls to Nationwide that night, many tears, and numerous subsequent calls and letters, have left us with just £1,000 returned," says Donaldson—which isn't her real name. How she failed to notice the problem for two years is another story. The Guardian partly blames paperless bank statements, which are easier for customers to ignore than snail-mail versions. (An Arkansas couple recently had a much rosier financial tale to tell.)

 

 


TOPICS: Business/Economy; Computers/Internet
KEYWORDS: banking; oops
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The £26,000 banking error

Sally lost two years' pay after mis-typing a digit during an online transfer. Now she can't get her missing money back

It was a sickening, gut-wrenching moment when, one evening in October 2012, Sally Donaldson checked her bank account and realised she had made the silliest financial mistake of her life.

Two years earlier, hairdresser Sally had organised for her monthly pay, £1,000, to be transferred from her HSBC account to the joint account at Nationwide building society she shares with her husband. But on that October night, the mother of two discovered she had made a simple but calamitous error.

It's a mistake anyone can make. To transfer money online from one account to another, you simply tap in the recipient's name, their sort code and account number. But Sally had incorrectly typed in just one of the eight digits in the account number – and the money was sent to the wrong person.

What makes her story so extraordinary, though, is that she made the mistake in May 2010. Every month since – for more than two years – her pay was going into someone else's Nationwide account. And now, to her horror, Sally is discovering she has almost no chance of getting back a penny of the £26,650 transferred in error.

 

more....

 

1 posted on 02/11/2013 7:45:02 AM PST by Responsibility2nd
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To: Responsibility2nd

That sucks, but the bank is right in this situation. She voluntarily mis-typed her account and gave the bank permission to move the funds.

The bank doesn’t owe her a cent for her error.


2 posted on 02/11/2013 7:47:59 AM PST by Jonty30 (What Islam and secularism have in common is that they are both death cults.)
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To: Responsibility2nd

Here in the US, if money “unexpectedly” shows up in your account it is NOT yours (same for an ATM that unexpectedly spews money at you).

Banking laws are pretty clear — the one who withdrew the money has committed a crime and the bank has to make good on the mistake as well as go after the unintended recipient.


3 posted on 02/11/2013 7:49:08 AM PST by freedumb2003 (I learned everything I needed to know about racism from Colin Powell)
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To: Responsibility2nd

Two years.
I sure as hell would notice I am missing 1,500 a month.
I have no sympathy for her.
Now if she told the bank in two months then it would be a different story.


4 posted on 02/11/2013 7:50:10 AM PST by svcw (Why is one cell on another planet considered life, and in the womb it is not.)
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To: svcw

I completely agree. How can you not check you finances for 2 years and not notice $1500/mo is missing?

Something smells very fishy.


5 posted on 02/11/2013 7:55:52 AM PST by SampleMan (Feral Humans are the refuse of socialism.)
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To: Jonty30

but if the bank does it by accident and you take the money out, you get charged with theft


6 posted on 02/11/2013 7:58:05 AM PST by GeronL (http://asspos.blogspot.com)
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To: Jonty30

The bank won’t even tell her the name of the recipient who has the money. I suppose the foolish woman can get an attorney and try to sue.

But if the bank is not negligible and the recipient is broke, then whats the point?


7 posted on 02/11/2013 7:59:44 AM PST by Responsibility2nd (NO LIBS. This Means Liberals and (L)libertarians! Same Thing. NO LIBS!!)
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To: Responsibility2nd

8 posted on 02/11/2013 7:59:44 AM PST by Red Badger (Lincoln freed the slaves. Obama just got them ALL back......................)
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To: freedumb2003

Here in the US, if money “unexpectedly” shows up in your account it is NOT yours (same for an ATM that unexpectedly spews money at you).

Banking laws are pretty clear — the one who withdrew the money has committed a crime and the bank has to make good on the mistake as well as go after the unintended recipient.


Zactly.

My bank was putting someone’s SS payments in my account because I had the same name as this person. I told them about it and they corrected it. Sure, it was the right thing to do, but let’s be frank here: It’s not my money ane everybody with a vested interest (including the police and prosecutors) knows it.

Fact is, one could make the argument that a criminal case against the person taking the money is justifiable.


9 posted on 02/11/2013 8:00:18 AM PST by cuban leaf (Were doomed! Details at eleven.)
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To: Responsibility2nd

1 digit wrong.
Back in the early 70’s I first heard about the use of a “check digit” included in identifying numbers, such as account numbers, membership numbers. This is an extra digit which serves as a check on whether the other digits were entered correctly. The number is created through a simple calculation, such that entering one digit wrong, or transposing digits will always produce an error that will be detected by simple program code.
So where were the bankers’ heads when they designed their system of bank accounts?

BTW, this is obviously too difficult for the people in the government to understand, so they have not even thought of incorporating this in the universal personal identifier: the social security number.

In case someone from SSA is able to read, here’s what you have do. Figure out the check digit for all existing SSN’s. Inform everyone of the new number.

Oh, I forgot. To change your computer systems to accomodate the longer personal ID, will cost 10 billion dollars. Never mind.


10 posted on 02/11/2013 8:00:25 AM PST by I want the USA back
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To: Responsibility2nd

Only tells us that the security access is too lax for the account. You shouldn’t be able to send it. It says she got two out of three required entries correct. Well, then it shouldn’t have happened. It has to be a 3 out of 3 match or nothing...I think the bank’s system is set up wrong.


11 posted on 02/11/2013 8:03:21 AM PST by Sacajaweau
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To: svcw

The woman is just careless and stupid. When I add a new account that I will pay money to, I send a payment of $1, and verify it got to the right account, before setting up larger payments.


12 posted on 02/11/2013 8:06:08 AM PST by PapaBear3625 (You don't notice it's a police state until the police come for you.)
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To: freedumb2003

In the past I banked at USBank.

A few years ago I checked the balance in mid-month and discovered my bank account bigger by about $100,000!

I notified customer service immediately, who were genuinely puzzled. It vanished three days later.

Was it an error? Or was someone within the bank embezzling?


13 posted on 02/11/2013 8:11:02 AM PST by SatinDoll (NATURAL BORN CITZEN: BORN IN THE USA OF CITIZEN PARENTS.)
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To: Responsibility2nd

If she was a rich and famous person, the bank would be making sure this was cleared up.

While the bank doesn’t owe her, the person who received the money does. That person knew the money wasn’t theirs, and yet they spent it anyway.

Such behavior has earned US citizens a little time in the big house. It’s considered theft.


14 posted on 02/11/2013 8:14:32 AM PST by greeneyes (Moderation in defense of your country is NO virtue. Let Freedom Ring.)
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To: Responsibility2nd

About 3 years ago, the bank made a typing error when they credited my payment to the electric company. It was a paper check. It should have been $115 and they took out $1150. When I noticed the problem, it took me 3 months of calls to get my money back and my balance straight. First of all the electric company gave everybody a hard time about giving back their windfall. Next the bank socked me for several overdrafts resulting from not having the funds. In all it took 3 or 4 months.


15 posted on 02/11/2013 8:17:17 AM PST by BuffaloJack (Children, pets, and slaves get taken care of. Free Men take care of themselves.)
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To: Responsibility2nd
To transfer money online from one account to another, you simply tap in the recipient's name, their sort code and account number.

If the names don't match, the transaction should have been refused. From day one.

16 posted on 02/11/2013 8:22:33 AM PST by coloradan (The US has become a banana republic, except without the bananas - or the republic.)
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To: Responsibility2nd

Hence why you give a voided deposit slip or check to do direct drafts.

That said I have never been on my account at my bank’s website or an ATM and asked to enter an account number, that is just BS. It is either already verified and listed in my “accounts” section.

Sounds fishy to me.


17 posted on 02/11/2013 8:25:22 AM PST by Resolute Conservative
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To: SatinDoll

About 25 years ago, during a period when I barely had my head above water, I received a notice that my checking account was overdrawn.

I can no longer remember the exact numbers, but the notice was showing a starting balance of over $1M. But I was overdrawn because I had written a check for thousands over this imaginary balance. In truth, neither my balance nor my check amounts in that account ever exceeded 3 digits.

I have no idea of what caused this mistake, and my call to the bank got me no information other than that there had been a mistake that was immediately rectified.


18 posted on 02/11/2013 8:26:29 AM PST by Bigg Red (Restore us, O God of hosts; let your face shine, that we may be saved! -Ps80)
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To: Jonty30

Frankly, I just don’t believe this story. NOBODY transfers money to another account mistakenly and lets that ride for two years. If I were the police, I’d be looking for whoever owns that mistaken account. My money is that it is owned by someone she knows and they are just trying to defraud the bank.


19 posted on 02/11/2013 8:31:28 AM PST by Gaffer
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To: Responsibility2nd

Okay. If she didn’t check her account for two years she’s stupid.

But going by what’s in the story, she should be able to sue the bejeebus out of the bank.


20 posted on 02/11/2013 8:34:16 AM PST by PLMerite (Shut the Beyotch Down! Burn, baby, burn!)
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