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Water In LA Hotel Tank Deemed Safe After Do-Not-Drink Order
cbs/ap ^ | February 21, 2013 3:05 PM

Posted on 02/21/2013 10:35:50 PM PST by BenLurkin

Authorities say a test of a Los Angeles hotel water tank where a Canadian tourist’s body was found this week didn’t find any live bacteria that would cause illness.

The test was conducted Tuesday after 21-year-old Elisa Lam was found wedged into one of four water cisterns atop the downtown Cecil Hotel.

The county Department of Public Health has, however, issued a do-not-drink order, and only water for toilets is flowing for hotel guests.

County health official Angelo Bellomo says chlorine in the water likely killed any bacteria in the tank where Lam’s body was found.

(Excerpt) Read more at losangeles.cbslocal.com ...


TOPICS: Local News
KEYWORDS:
No thanks.....
1 posted on 02/21/2013 10:35:53 PM PST by BenLurkin
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To: BenLurkin

We find no human remains that exceed the USDA regulated levels.


2 posted on 02/21/2013 10:37:39 PM PST by Jet Jaguar
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To: BenLurkin

Now, if it had been two bodies, that would of been a different matter!


3 posted on 02/21/2013 10:39:25 PM PST by Revolting cat! (Bad things are wrong! Ice cream is delicious!)
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To: BenLurkin
the downtown Cecil Hotel.

One of LA's finest no doubt.

4 posted on 02/21/2013 10:40:24 PM PST by Alaska Wolf (I)
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To: Alaska Wolf

5 posted on 02/21/2013 10:41:59 PM PST by Revolting cat! (Bad things are wrong! Ice cream is delicious!)
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To: Alaska Wolf

6 posted on 02/21/2013 10:45:06 PM PST by BenLurkin (This is not a statement of fact. It is either opinion or satire; or both)
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To: BenLurkin

looks like something out of a 1930’s crime noir novel...

or a square grain elevator


7 posted on 02/21/2013 10:48:39 PM PST by GeronL (http://asspos.blogspot.com)
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To: Revolting cat!

I didn’t find a wiki page for this historic edifice

but I found this:

http://www.tripadvisor.com/ShowUserReviews-g32655-d276208-r88370390-Cecil_Hotel-Los_Angeles_California.html

“I wish i would of read the reviews first. It is horrible! Unsafe! No Parking!!! I entered the lobby, it looked pretty nice, we checked in and in the elevator we go, The elevator can only hold up to 5 people, if you had more than 5 you had to wait. We went up, the hallways smelled TERRIBLE! The reason for the smell is because across the rooms there are bathrooms and showers,YOU DONT GET YOUR OWN! There was also holes in the showers. Wasn’t pleasent but we entered our room and guess what,dust,stains,small,cramped,NO AC and so many more problems! If you wanted a fan you would have to pay extra per night! The doors were so weak that you could hit it open if it was locked! NOT SAFE! There was only 1 small bed for a family of 5! We went down to the lobby and asked why there was one small bed for our family they replied “ Its for 2 people sorry” When we booked we put 5 and told them to look it up and it said for 5 she didnt have anything to say but we can switch you to two TWIN beds but still it wouldnt be enough space so we wanted to leave to a different hotel. we wanted to know if there was wifi but it was near the stairs not in the bedroom. She charged us $80 and we didnt spend the night!! Refused to give money back! Dangerous at night lot of achoaol, cocainne and ghetto area! We went to the Wilshire hotel, it is a wonderful hotel with friendly staff and a lot of hotel remedies!! DO NOT RECOMMEND THE CECIL HOTEL!!!!!!!! “


8 posted on 02/21/2013 10:50:49 PM PST by GeronL (http://asspos.blogspot.com)
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To: GeronL

This is a flophouse, not the Holiday Inn


9 posted on 02/21/2013 11:06:23 PM PST by Arthurio
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To: GeronL; Revolting cat!; BenLurkin

I imagine that having to spend a few days alone in one of those rooms with an airshaft view would be enough to drive anyone nuts.


10 posted on 02/21/2013 11:09:07 PM PST by wideminded
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To: BenLurkin

I was on a site last week when this gal’s sister posted a plea about her missing sister. She said the sister was in LA and had never missed a day of calling home, so she asked everyone to be on the lookout for her. Sad.


11 posted on 02/21/2013 11:11:06 PM PST by Cementjungle
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To: BenLurkin

That building looks like it’s forming up for a Conga Line...


12 posted on 02/21/2013 11:29:06 PM PST by Amberdawn
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To: Amberdawn

I thought the building kind of looks like Cabrini Green public housing.


13 posted on 02/22/2013 12:11:10 AM PST by boop ("You don't look so bad, here's another")
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To: BenLurkin

I posted a comment on this story but didn’t get a response. .... I’m trying to understand a technical issue with this story because something seems a bit weird beyond the finding of a body in a water tank. I’ve worked in a wide range of commercial office buildings and number of large hotels and on many occasions, had to go on to the roof of many of them to do some work on cooling towers or other components of HVAC systems. Admittedly, I don’t work on the water systems and none of my experiences involved Los Angeles. However, I don’t ever remember being on a roof that had an accessible tank that was used for potable water… never. For one thing, uncontrolled pollutants and insects could access it, in cold climes it would freeze and in warm climes it would get warm. There would be huge risks of legionnaire’s disease and moulds forming depending on the temperature etc etc. Yes, there needs to be a means of regulating building water pressures and flows…. But do they really do this for potable water through the use of tanks that are accessible? I would have thought that a sealed tank would have been used, no? If a Freeper here has some experience in this area, I would greatly appreciate being enlightened……


14 posted on 02/22/2013 4:33:09 AM PST by hecticskeptic
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To: wideminded; Arthurio

It looks like a NY ghetto tenement house from the 30’s


15 posted on 02/22/2013 6:39:41 AM PST by GeronL (http://asspos.blogspot.com)
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To: hecticskeptic

I’m a building engineer.

Every large tank must have an opening large enough for a man. The openings are seldom if ever locked so it’s no surprise that something like this happened.

Yes, in most places the tanks are indoors or in a heated roof enclosure to prevent freezing. But this was LA and it can’t get cold enough there to freeze a large tank. Exposed tanks are fairly common in such climates.

And yes, in most cases potable water should not be stagnant at room-temperature while exposed to air. The only exception is a large tank. I would guess because it has its own natural internal circulation, is sealed from sunlight, and a relatively small percentage of the water is exposed to air. It would take a LONG time for a big tank to go bad. Also remember that the water is constantly being used and slowly replaced.


16 posted on 02/22/2013 6:45:39 AM PST by varyouga
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To: varyouga

Thanks for the reply. I really am going to have to pay more attention the next time that I’m on a roof somewhere and will make a point of asking about the water supply design…..so far, this seems to tell me that I’m simply not as observant as I thought I was. I live in the country and thus not on city services…. I have my own well and septic system. My pressure tank for the house is about 50 gallons in size and it has an internal bladder that stretches in response to the water pressure settings on the incoming line. I would have assumed that this sort of approach (sealed pressure tanks with internal bladders) would be used in high rise buildings as well but from what you’re saying, I guess not. Actually, the size of the tanks on the roof of the hotel in question makes me wonder how well thought through this is from a structural perspective. Are you saying it is relatively common to use accessible tanks like what they have on the roof of this hotel? With more modern buildings, do they not go without tanks at all (or just small tanks) but just use pumps at strategic elevation points that are controlled by variable frequency drives to respond to the building pressure requirements?


17 posted on 02/22/2013 7:57:06 AM PST by hecticskeptic
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To: varyouga
I’m a building engineer.

A chance to ask some questions that I have been wondering about!

1. Why are water tanks on older buildings frequently made of wood? Why weren't all these wood tanks changed out years ago?

2. Why do these wood tanks often look as if they were added to the building as an afterthought?

18 posted on 02/22/2013 10:51:51 AM PST by wideminded
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To: varyouga

In my hometown, some kids climbed into a city water tower and took a swim. Not only did they get in big trouble, the water department had to do something (I forget what) to “treat” the water for contamination.


19 posted on 02/22/2013 10:46:36 PM PST by boop ("You don't look so bad, here's another")
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To: hecticskeptic

Look here:

http://www.rgj.com/article/20130221/HOT/130221002/Body-Canadian-woman-found-LA-hotel-water-tank-watch-video-

Looks like there are hatches on the tanks.


20 posted on 02/22/2013 11:07:01 PM PST by this_ol_patriot
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To: wideminded

Wood tanks are cheaper, they don’t corrode and they don’t give water a metallic taste. Plus, wood tanks do a better job of minimizing the effects of seasonal temperature fluctuations, they don’t need heating. There are well-maintained redwood tanks in NYC that are 90 years old, you’ll never get that out of a metal tank.

http://www.rosenwachtank.com/


21 posted on 02/22/2013 11:32:53 PM PST by this_ol_patriot
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To: this_ol_patriot

Thanks for the link.


22 posted on 02/23/2013 11:44:45 AM PST by wideminded
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To: this_ol_patriot
Thanks for the link. I think that the pictures there are the first that I've seen from that angle. Small access door...appears to be smaller than the width of the shoulders of the guy standing in front of it. Those tanks appear to be painted... one would expect that they'd be made of stainless steel if used for potable water, no?
23 posted on 02/23/2013 8:00:47 PM PST by hecticskeptic
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To: wideminded
1. Wood is cheaper, lighter and insulates better. You don't even need freeze protection for a wood tank in NYC.

2. The tanks are often on elevated platforms to increase pressure to the upper floors. The direct sun helps keep them from freezing. It would cost a fortune to put them in a pretty, accessible, structurally-sound enclosure and heat them. It's also much easier to replace the tank on a wide open platform.

Back in the day, aesthetics took far back seat to low cost. Especially in certain neighborhoods. A super trendy neighborhood today could have been a bleak industrial zone when the building was built. Manhattan once had entire neighborhoods full of factories, open markets, slaughterhouses, etc.

24 posted on 02/25/2013 7:20:54 AM PST by varyouga
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To: BenLurkin; GeronL

It looks like they painted over the “hourly” sign to make the place look more classy...


25 posted on 02/25/2013 7:22:45 AM PST by varyouga
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To: hecticskeptic
“Actually, the size of the tanks on the roof of the hotel in question makes me wonder how well thought through this is from a structural perspective. Are you saying it is relatively common to use accessible tanks like what they have on the roof of this hotel?”

If the structural guy knows about the tanks, they would design the structure accordingly. The biggest problem in construction is lack of communication and fighting between trades. For example: when a plumber realizes he needs tanks, he might forget to notify structural of the additional load. Or he might send an email that gets lost and the finger pointing begins.

This type of design with roof tanks is typically found in warmer climates like LA. In cold places like NYC, most tanks are wooden or in heated enclosures.

“With more modern buildings, do they not go without tanks at all (or just small tanks) but just use pumps at strategic elevation points that are controlled by variable frequency drives to respond to the building pressure requirements?”

There are such buildings but the ones with high short-term water demand still need tanks. With big enough pumps, the tanks can sit on the ground. You almost always need tanks because most water companies limit how much a single building can draw from the street main. For high rises, this limit is much less than your peak demand so the tank acts as a buffer. The tanks are also typically your source for sprinkler water so they are sized

26 posted on 02/25/2013 8:11:05 AM PST by varyouga
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To: varyouga

“Classy” that word didn’t really cross my mind at all. LOL


27 posted on 02/25/2013 9:09:59 AM PST by GeronL (http://asspos.blogspot.com)
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To: Arthurio; GeronL
Someone I was working with flew into NYC from the midwest. She decided to stay at the Chelsea Hotel! Not because it was the closest but because it was “historic and edgy”. She was a pretty blonde, no less.

I thought “hey, I guess the place changed after Giuliani” and she said the place looked decent on the outside.

Well, when she finally got to her room there was a junkie smoking crack in her bed saying “5 minutes”. Got another room but figured out the door doesn't really lock. She ended up just barricading the door with furniture and staying one night.

28 posted on 02/27/2013 9:59:06 PM PST by varyouga
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To: varyouga

lol.

Hey, you want edgy!

The floor and mattresses were so stained at the Village Inn in Terrell Texas that the dogs refused to go in there!


29 posted on 02/27/2013 11:25:35 PM PST by GeronL (http://asspos.blogspot.com)
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To: GeronL

Here’s a review of the Chelsea that had me LOL. By some braindead lib from “Europe”. Notice how everything is said with a qualifier and he/she/it can’t insult this “holy” place:

“We thoroughly enjoyed our stay. Everything everybody has said in previous reviews, both good and bad, are true. The place appears to be utterly charming and the shabby-chic decor was a welcome relief from the blandness of many more modern hotels.

However, on our arrival home we discovered that we had contracted SCABIES. Our doctor confirmed that the most likely source of contamination was the hotel. I was disgusted! I immediately contacted the hotel by email to let them know and began the process of cleaning everything that had possibly been contaminated during our stay.

Suddenly the relaxed approach to cleaning the room - the fact the bed was remade but the sheets not changed, the way the towels were changed but the shower wasn’t scrubbed - didn’t seem so acceptable.”

This place sounds worse than 3rd world. The staff supposedly look homeless

http://www.tripadvisor.com/ShowUserReviews-g60763-d219622-r1119006-Chelsea_Hotel-New_York_City_New_York.html#REVIEWS


30 posted on 02/28/2013 7:26:29 PM PST by varyouga
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To: varyouga

Scuzzy-chic is Cool until you get Scabies!


31 posted on 02/28/2013 7:30:01 PM PST by GeronL (http://asspos.blogspot.com)
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